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2015


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Grain boundaries as a source of ferromagnetism and increased solubility of Ni in nanograined ZnO

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Stakhanova, S. V., Straumal, P. B., Bulatov, M. F., Schütz, G., Tietze, T., Goering, E., Baretzky, B.

{Reviews on Advanced Materials Science}, 41, pages: 61-71, 2015 (article)

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[BibTex]

2015


[BibTex]


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Gyrational modes of benzenelike magnetic vortex molecules

Adolff, C. F., Hänze, M., Pues, M., Weigand, M., Meier, G.

{Physical Review B}, 92(2), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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"Job-Sharing" storage of hydrogen in Ru/Li2O nanocomposites

Fu, L., Tang, K., Oh, H., Kandavel, M., Bräuniger, T., Vinod Chandran, C., Menzel, A., Hirscher, M., Samuelis, D., Maier, J.

{Nano Letters}, 15(6):4170-4175, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Overview of the multilayer-Fresnel zone plate and the kinoform lens development at MPI for Intelligent Systems

Sanli, U., Keskinbora, K., Grévent, C., Schütz, G.

{Proceedings of SPIE}, 9510, SPIE, Bellingham, Washington, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]


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Transition matrix elements for electron-phonon scattering: Phenomenological theory and ab initio electron theory

Illg, C., Haag, M., Müller, B. Y., Czycholl, G., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 92(19), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Phase evolution in single-crystalline LiFePO4 followed by in situ scanning X-ray microscopy of a micrometre-sized battery

Ohmer, N., Fenk, B., Samuelis, D., Chen, C., Maier, J., Weigand, M., Goering, E., Schütz, G.

{Nature Communications}, 6, Nature Publishing Group, London, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Nitrogen-rich covalent triazine frameworks as high-performance platforms for selective carbon capture and storage

Hug, S., Stegbauer, L., Oh, H., Hirscher, M., Lotsch, B. V.

{Chemistry of Materials}, 27(23):8001-8010, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Novel plasticity rule can explain the development of sensorimotor intelligence

Der, R., Martius, G.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(45):E6224-E6232, 2015 (article)

Abstract
Grounding autonomous behavior in the nervous system is a fundamental challenge for neuroscience. In particular, self-organized behavioral development provides more questions than answers. Are there special functional units for curiosity, motivation, and creativity? This paper argues that these features can be grounded in synaptic plasticity itself, without requiring any higher-level constructs. We propose differential extrinsic plasticity (DEP) as a new synaptic rule for self-learning systems and apply it to a number of complex robotic systems as a test case. Without specifying any purpose or goal, seemingly purposeful and adaptive rhythmic behavior is developed, displaying a certain level of sensorimotor intelligence. These surprising results require no system-specific modifications of the DEP rule. They rather arise from the underlying mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking, which is due to the tight brain body environment coupling. The new synaptic rule is biologically plausible and would be an interesting target for neurobiological investigation. We also argue that this neuronal mechanism may have been a catalyst in natural evolution.

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Multilayer Fresnel zone plates for X-ray microscopy

Sanli, U. T., Keskinbora, K., Grévent, C., Szeghalmi, A., Knez, M., Schütz, G.

{Microscopy and Microanalysis}, 21(Suppl 3):1987-1988, Springer-Verlag New York, New York, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Interfacial dominated ferromagnetism in nanograined ZnO: a \muSR and DFT study

Tietze, T., Audehm, P., Chen, Y., Schütz, G., Straumal, B. B., Protasova, S. G., Mazilkin, A. A., Straumal, P. B., Prokscha, T., Luetkens, H., Salman, Z., Suter, A., Baretzky, B., Fink, K., Wenzel, W., Danilov, D., Goering, E.

{Scientific Reports}, 5, pages: 8871-8876, Nature Publishing Group, London, UK, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Preparation of a ferromagnetic barrier in YBa2Cu3O7-delta thinner than the coherence length

Soltan, S., Albrecht, J., Goering, E., Schütz, G., Mustafa, L., Keimer, B., Habermeier, H.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 118(22), AIP Publishing, New York, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Microanalytical methods for in-situ high-resolution analysis of rock varnish at the micrometer to nanometer scale

Macholdt, D. S., Jochum, K. P., Pöhlker, C., Stoll, B., Weis, U., Weber, B., Müller, M., Kapl, M., Buhre, S., Kilcoyne, A. L. D., Weigand, M., Scholz, D., Al-Amri, A. M., Andreae, M. O.

{Chemical Geology}, 411, pages: 57-68, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

Mikhailov, E. F., Mironov, G. N., Pöhlker, C., Chi, X., Krüger, M., Shiraiwa, M., Förster, J., Pöschl, U., Vlasenko, S. S., Ryshkevich, T. I., Weigand, M., Kilcoyne, A. L. D., Andreae, M.

{Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}, 15(15):8847-8869, European Geosciences Union, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Orbital reflectometry of PrNiO3/PrAlO3 superlattices

Wu, M., Benckiser, E., Audehm, P., Goering, E., Wochner, P., Christiani, G., Logvenov, G., Habermeier, H., Keimer, B.

{Physical Review B}, 91(19), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Dynamic domain wall chirality rectification by rotating magnetic fields

Bisig, A., Mawass, M., Stärk, M., Moutafis, C., Rhensius, J., Heidler, J., Gliga, S., Weigand, M., Tyliszczak, T., Van Waeyenberge, B., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Kläui, M.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106(12), American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Imaging spin dynamics on the nanoscale using X-ray microscopy

Stoll, H., Noske, M., Weigand, M., Richter, K., Krüger, B., Reeve, R. M., Hänze, M., Adolff, C. F., Stein, F., Meier, G., Kläui, M., Schütz, G.

{Frontiers in Physics}, 3, Frontiers Media, Lausanne, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structure Learning in Bayesian Sensorimotor Integration

Genewein, T, Hez, E, Razzaghpanah, Z, Braun, DA

PLoS Computational Biology, 11(8):1-27, August 2015 (article)

Abstract
Previous studies have shown that sensorimotor processing can often be described by Bayesian learning, in particular the integration of prior and feedback information depending on its degree of reliability. Here we test the hypothesis that the integration process itself can be tuned to the statistical structure of the environment. We exposed human participants to a reaching task in a three-dimensional virtual reality environment where we could displace the visual feedback of their hand position in a two dimensional plane. When introducing statistical structure between the two dimensions of the displacement, we found that over the course of several days participants adapted their feedback integration process in order to exploit this structure for performance improvement. In control experiments we found that this adaptation process critically depended on performance feedback and could not be induced by verbal instructions. Our results suggest that structural learning is an important meta-learning component of Bayesian sensorimotor integration.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Unique high-temperature performance of highly consensed MnBi permanent magnets

Chen, Y., Gregori, G., Leineweber, A., Qu, F., Chen, C., Tietze, T., Kronmüller, H., Schütz, G., Goering, E.

{Scripta Materialia}, 107, pages: 131-135, Pergamon, Tarrytown, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Quantifying Emergent Behavior of Autonomous Robots

Martius, G., Olbrich, E.

Entropy, 17(10):7266, 2015 (article)

al

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Electrical determination of vortex state in submicron magnetic elements

Gangwar, A., Bauer, H. G., Chauleau, J., Noske, M., Weigand, M., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Back, C. H.

{Physical Review B}, 91(9), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Mechanisms for the symmetric and antisymmetric switching of a magnetic vortex core: Differences and common aspects

Noske, M., Stoll, H., Fähnle, M., Hertel, R., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review B}, 91(1), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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High resolution, high efficiency mulitlayer Fresnel zone plates for soft and hard X-rays

Sanli, U., Keskinbora, K., Gregorczyk, K., Leister, J., Teeny, N., Grévent, C., Knez, M., Schütz, G.

{Proceedings of SPIE}, 9592, SPIE, Bellingham, Washington, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Macroscopic drift current in the inverse Faraday effect

Hertel, R., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 91(2), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Single-step 3D nanofabrication of kinoform optics via gray-scale focused ion beam lithography for efficient X-ray focusing

Keskinbora, K., Grévent, C., Hirscher, M., Weigand, M., Schütz, G.

{Advanced Optical Materials}, 3, pages: 792-800, WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Band structure engineering of two-dimensional magnonic vortex crystals

Behncke, C., Hänze, M., Adolff, C. F., Weigand, M., Meier, G.

{Physical Review B}, 91(22), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Towards denoising XMCD movies of fast magnetization dynamics using extended Kalman filter

Kopp, M., Harmeling, S., Schütz, G., Schölkopf, B., Fähnle, M.

{Ultramicroscopy}, 148, pages: 115-122, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Reward-Maximizing Spiking Neuron as a Bounded Rational Decision Maker

Leibfried, F, Braun, DA

Neural Computation, 27(8):1686-1720, July 2015 (article)

Abstract
Rate distortion theory describes how to communicate relevant information most efficiently over a channel with limited capacity. One of the many applications of rate distortion theory is bounded rational decision making, where decision makers are modeled as information channels that transform sensory input into motor output under the constraint that their channel capacity is limited. Such a bounded rational decision maker can be thought to optimize an objective function that trades off the decision maker's utility or cumulative reward against the information processing cost measured by the mutual information between sensory input and motor output. In this study, we interpret a spiking neuron as a bounded rational decision maker that aims to maximize its expected reward under the computational constraint that the mutual information between the neuron's input and output is upper bounded. This abstract computational constraint translates into a penalization of the deviation between the neuron's instantaneous and average firing behavior. We derive a synaptic weight update rule for such a rate distortion optimizing neuron and show in simulations that the neuron efficiently extracts reward-relevant information from the input by trading off its synaptic strengths against the collected reward.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi

Krannich, S., Sidis, Y., Lamago, D., Heid, R., Mignot, J., von Löhneysen, H., Ivanov, A., Steffens, P., Keller, T., Wang, L., Goering, E., Weber, F.

{Nature Communications}, 6, Nature Publishing Group, London, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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What is epistemic value in free energy models of learning and acting? A bounded rationality perspective

Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

Cognitive Neuroscience, 6(4):215-216, December 2015 (article)

Abstract
Free energy models of learning and acting do not only care about utility or extrinsic value, but also about intrinsic value, that is, the information value stemming from probability distributions that represent beliefs or strategies. While these intrinsic values can be interpreted as epistemic values or exploration bonuses under certain conditions, the framework of bounded rationality offers a complementary interpretation in terms of information-processing costs that we discuss here.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Perpendicular magnetisation from in-plane fields in nano-scaled antidot lattices

Gräfe, J., Haering, F., Tietze, T., Audehm, P., Weigand, M., Wiedwald, U., Ziemann, P., Gawronski, P., Schütz, G., Goering, E. J.

{Nanotechnology}, 26(22), IOP Pub., Bristol, UK, 2015 (article)

mms

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Theory of ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser pulses

Fähnle, M., Illg, C., Haag, M., Teeny, N.

{Acta Physica Polonica A}, 127(2):170-175, Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, Warszawa, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Non-linear radial spinwave modes in thin magnetic disks

Helsen, M., Gangwar, Ajay, De Clercq, J., Vansteenkiste, A., Weigand, M., Back, C. H., Van Waeyenberge, B.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106(3), American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Hydrogen isotope separation in metal-organic frameworks: Kinetic or chemical affinity quantum-sieving?

Savchenko, I., Mavrandonakis, A., Heine, T., Oh, H., Teufel, J., Hirscher, M.

{Microporous and Mesoporous Materials}, 216, pages: 133-137, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

Ruoß, S., Stahl, C., Weigand, M., Schütz, G., Albrecht, J.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106, American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Preparation and characterisation of epitaxial Pt/Cu/FeMn/Co thin films on (100)-oriented MgO single crystals

Schmidt, M., Gräfe, J., Audehm, P., Phillipp, F., Schütz, G., Goering, E.

{Physica Status Solidi A}, 212(10):2114-2123, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Probing the magnetic moments of [MnIII6CrIII]3+ single-molecule magnets - A cross comparison of XMCD and spin-resolved electron spectroscopy

Helmstedt, A., Dohmeier, N., Müller, N., Gryzia, A., Brechling, A., Heinzmann, U., Hoeke, V., Krickemeyer, E., Glaser, T., Leicht, P., Fonin, M., Tietze, T., Joly, L., Kuepper, K.

{Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena}, 198, pages: 12-19, Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2011


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Combined whole-body PET/MR imaging: MR contrast agents do not affect the quantitative accuracy of PET following attenuation correction

Lois, C., Kupferschläger, J., Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Werner, M., Mannheim, J., Pichler, B., Schwenzer, N., Beyer, T.

(SST15-05 ), 97th Scientific Assemble and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), December 2011 (talk)

Abstract
PURPOSE Combined PET/MR imaging entails the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) as part of integrated protocols. We assess additional attenuation of the PET emission signals in the presence of oral and intraveneous (iv) MRCA made up of iron oxide and Gd-chelates, respectively. METHOD AND MATERIALS Phantom scans were performed on a clinical PET/CT (Biograph HiRez16, Siemens) and integrated whole-body PET/MR (Biograph mMR, Siemens) using oral (Lumirem) and intraveneous (Gadovist) MRCA. Reference PET attenuation values were determined on a small-animal PET (Inveon, Siemens) using standard PET transmission imaging (TX). Seven syringes of 5mL were filled with (a) Water, (b) Lumirem_100 (100% conc.), (c) Gadovist_100 (100%), (d) Gadovist_18 (18%), (e) Gadovist_02 (0.2%), (f) Imeron-400 CT iv-contrast (100%) and (g) Imeron-400 (2.4%). The same set of syringes was scanned on CT (Sensation16, Siemens) at 120kVp and 160mAs. The effect of MRCA on the attenuation of PET emission data was evaluated using a 20cm cylinder filled uniformly with [18F]-FDG (FDG) in water (BGD). Three 4.5cm diameter cylinders were inserted into the phantom: (C1) Teflon, (C2) Water+FDG (2:1) and (C3) Lumirem_100+FDG (2:1). Two 50mL syringes filled with Gadovist_02+FDG (Sy1) and water+FDG (Sy2) were attached to the sides of (C1) to mimick the effects of iv-contrast in vessels near bone. Syringe-to-background activity ratio was 4-to-1. PET emission data were acquired for 10min each using the PET/CT and the PET/MR. Images were reconstructed using CT- and MR-based attenuation correction. RESULTS Mean linear PET attenuation (cm-1) on TX was (a) 0.098, (b) 0.098, (c) 0.300, (d) 0.134, (e) 0.095, (f) 0.397 and (g) 0.105. Corresponding CT attenuation (HU) was: (a) 5, (b) 14, (c) 3070, (d) 1040, (e) 13, (f) 3070 and (g) 347. Lumirem had little effect on PET attenuation with (C3) being 13% and 10% higher than (C2) on PET/CT and PET/MR, respectively. Gadovist_02 had even smaller effects with (Sy1) being 2.5% lower than (Sy2) on PET/CT and 1.2% higher than (Sy2) on PET/MR. CONCLUSION MRCA in high and clinically relevant concentrations have attenuation values similar to that of CT contrast and water, respectively. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to significant attenuation of the PET emission signals.

ei

Web [BibTex]

2011


Web [BibTex]


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Causal Inference on Discrete Data using Additive Noise Models

Peters, J., Janzing, D., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 33(12):2436-2450, December 2011 (article)

Abstract
Inferring the causal structure of a set of random variables from a finite sample of the joint distribution is an important problem in science. The case of two random variables is particularly challenging since no (conditional) independences can be exploited. Recent methods that are based on additive noise models suggest the following principle: Whenever the joint distribution {\bf P}^{(X,Y)} admits such a model in one direction, e.g., Y=f(X)+N, N \perp\kern-6pt \perp X, but does not admit the reversed model X=g(Y)+\tilde{N}, \tilde{N} \perp\kern-6pt \perp Y, one infers the former direction to be causal (i.e., X\rightarrow Y). Up to now, these approaches only dealt with continuous variables. In many situations, however, the variables of interest are discrete or even have only finitely many states. In this work, we extend the notion of additive noise models to these cases. We prove that it almost never occurs that additive noise models can be fit in both directions. We further propose an efficient algorithm that is able to perform this way of causal inference on finite samples of discrete variables. We show that the algorithm works on both synthetic and real data sets.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Spontaneous epigenetic variation in the Arabidopsis thaliana methylome

Becker, C., Hagmann, J., Müller, J., Koenig, D., Stegle, O., Borgwardt, K., Weigel, D.

Nature, 480(7376):245-249, December 2011 (article)

Abstract
Heritable epigenetic polymorphisms, such as differential cytosine methylation, can underlie phenotypic variation1, 2. Moreover, wild strains of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana differ in many epialleles3, 4, and these can influence the expression of nearby genes1, 2. However, to understand their role in evolution5, it is imperative to ascertain the emergence rate and stability of epialleles, including those that are not due to structural variation. We have compared genome-wide DNA methylation among 10 A. thaliana lines, derived 30 generations ago from a common ancestor6. Epimutations at individual positions were easily detected, and close to 30,000 cytosines in each strain were differentially methylated. In contrast, larger regions of contiguous methylation were much more stable, and the frequency of changes was in the same low range as that of DNA mutations7. Like individual positions, the same regions were often affected by differential methylation in independent lines, with evidence for recurrent cycles of forward and reverse mutations. Transposable elements and short interfering RNAs have been causally linked to DNA methylation8. In agreement, differentially methylated sites were farther from transposable elements and showed less association with short interfering RNA expression than invariant positions. The biased distribution and frequent reversion of epimutations have important implications for the potential contribution of sequence-independent epialleles to plant evolution.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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HHfrag: HMM-based fragment detection using HHpred

Kalev, I., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 27(22):3110-3116, November 2011 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Over the last decade, both static and dynamic fragment libraries for protein structure prediction have been introduced. The former are built from clusters in either sequence or structure space and aim to extract a universal structural alphabet. The latter are tailored for a particular query protein sequence and aim to provide local structural templates that need to be assembled in order to build the full-length structure. Results: Here, we introduce HHfrag, a dynamic HMM-based fragment search method built on the profile–profile comparison tool HHpred. We show that HHfrag provides advantages over existing fragment assignment methods in that it: (i) improves the precision of the fragments at the expense of a minor loss in sequence coverage; (ii) detects fragments of variable length (6–21 amino acid residues); (iii) allows for gapped fragments and (iv) does not assign fragments to regions where there is no clear sequence conservation. We illustrate the usefulness of fragments detected by HHfrag on targets from most recent CASP.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Reward-Weighted Regression with Sample Reuse for Direct Policy Search in Reinforcement Learning

Hachiya, H., Peters, J., Sugiyama, M.

Neural Computation, 23(11):2798-2832, November 2011 (article)

Abstract
Direct policy search is a promising reinforcement learning framework, in particular for controlling continuous, high-dimensional systems. Policy search often requires a large number of samples for obtaining a stable policy update estimator, and this is prohibitive when the sampling cost is expensive. In this letter, we extend an expectation-maximization-based policy search method so that previously collected samples can be efficiently reused. The usefulness of the proposed method, reward-weighted regression with sample reuse (R), is demonstrated through robot learning experiments.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Model Learning in Robotics: a Survey

Nguyen-Tuong, D., Peters, J.

Cognitive Processing, 12(4):319-340, November 2011 (article)

Abstract
Models are among the most essential tools in robotics, such as kinematics and dynamics models of the robot's own body and controllable external objects. It is widely believed that intelligent mammals also rely on internal models in order to generate their actions. However, while classical robotics relies on manually generated models that are based on human insights into physics, future autonomous, cognitive robots need to be able to automatically generate models that are based on information which is extracted from the data streams accessible to the robot. In this paper, we survey the progress in model learning with a strong focus on robot control on a kinematic as well as dynamical level. Here, a model describes essential information about the behavior of the environment and the in uence of an agent on this environment. In the context of model based learning control, we view the model from three di fferent perspectives. First, we need to study the di erent possible model learning architectures for robotics. Second, we discuss what kind of problems these architecture and the domain of robotics imply for the applicable learning methods. From this discussion, we deduce future directions of real-time learning algorithms. Third, we show where these scenarios have been used successfully in several case studies.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Cooperative Cuts: a new use of submodularity in image segmentation

Jegelka, S.

Second I.S.T. Austria Symposium on Computer Vision and Machine Learning, October 2011 (talk)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Effect of MR Contrast Agents on Quantitative Accuracy of PET in Combined Whole-Body PET/MR Imaging

Lois, C., Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Werner, M., Pichler, B., Kupferschläger, J., Beyer, T.

2011(MIC3-3), 2011 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference (NSS-MIC), October 2011 (talk)

Abstract
Combined whole-body PET/MR systems are being tested in clinical practice today. Integrated imaging protocols entail the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) that could bias PET attenuation correction. In this work, we assess the effect of MRCA in PET/MR imaging. We analyze the effect of oral and intravenous MRCA on PET activity after attenuation correction. We conclude that in clinical scenarios, MRCA are not expected to lead to significant attenuation of PET signals, and that attenuation maps are not biased after the ingestion of adequate oral contrasts.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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First Results on Patients and Phantoms of a Fully Integrated Clinical Whole-Body PET/MRI

Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Bezrukov, I., Kolb, A., Mantlik, F., Kupferschläger, J., Lois, C., Sauter, A., Brendle, C., Pfannenberg, C., Pichler, B.

2011(J2-8), 2011 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference (NSS-MIC), October 2011 (talk)

Abstract
First clinical fully integrated whole-body PET/MR scanners are just entering the field. Here, we present studies toward quantification accuracy and variation within the PET field of view of small lesions from our BrainPET/MRI, a dedicated clinical brain scanner which was installed three years ago in Tbingen. Also, we present first results for patient and phantom scans of a fully integral whole-body PET/MRI, which was installed two months ago at our department. The quantification accuracy and homogeneity of the BrainPET-Insert (Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany) installed inside the magnet bore of a clinical 3T MRI scanner (Magnetom TIM Trio, Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany) was evaluated by using eight hollow spheres with inner diameters from 3.95 to 7.86 mm placed at different positions inside a homogeneous cylinder phantom with an 9:1 and 6:1 sphere to background ratio. The quantification accuracy for small lesions at different positions in the PET FoV shows a standard deviation of up to 11% and is acceptable for quantitative brain studies where the homogeneity of quantification on the entire FoV is essental. Image quality and resolution of the new Siemens whole-body PET/MR system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany) was evaluated according to the NEMA NU2 2007 protocol using a body phantom containing six spheres with inner diameter from 10 to 37 mm at sphere to background ratios of 8:1 and 4:1 and the F-18 point sources located at different positions inside the PET FoV, respectively. The evaluation of the whole-body PET/MR system reveals a good PET image quality and resolution comparable to state-of-the-art clinical PET/CT scanners. First images of patient studies carried out at the whole-body PET/MR are presented highlighting the potency of combined PET/MR imaging.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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FaST linear mixed models for genome-wide association studies

Lippert, C., Listgarten, J., Liu, Y., Kadie, CM., Davidson, RI., Heckerman, D.

Nature Methods, 8(10):833–835, October 2011 (article)

Abstract
We describe factored spectrally transformed linear mixed models (FaST-LMM), an algorithm for genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that scales linearly with cohort size in both run time and memory use. On Wellcome Trust data for 15,000 individuals, FaST-LMM ran an order of magnitude faster than current efficient algorithms. Our algorithm can analyze data for 120,000 individuals in just a few hours, whereas current algorithms fail on data for even 20,000 individuals (http://mscompbio.codeplex.com/).

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

Lois, C., Kupferschläger, J., Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Werner, M., Mannheim, J., Pichler, B., Schwenzer, N., Beyer, T.

(OP314), Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), October 2011 (talk)

Abstract
PURPOSE:Combined PET/MR imaging entails the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) as part of integrated protocols. MRCA are made up of iron oxide and Gd-chelates for oral and intravenous (iv) application, respectively. We assess additional attenuation of the PET emission signals in the presence of oral and iv MRCA.MATERIALS AND METHODS:Phantom scans were performed on a clinical PET/CT (Biograph HiRez16, Siemens) and an integrated whole-body PET/MR (Biograph mMR, Siemens). Two common MRCA were evaluated: Lumirem (oral) and Gadovist (iv).Reference PET attenuation values were determined on a dedicated small-animal PET (Inveon, Siemens) using equivalent standard PET transmission source imaging (TX). Seven syringes of 5mL were filled with (a) Water, (b) Lumirem_100 (100% concentration), (c) Gadovist_100 (100%), (d) Gadovist_18 (18%), (e) Gadovist_02 (0.2%), (f) Imeron-400 CT iv-contrast (100%) and (g) Imeron-400 (2.4%). The same set of syringes was scanned on CT (Sensation16, Siemens) at 120kVp and 160mAs.The effect of MRCA on the attenuation of PET emission data was evaluated using a 20cm cylinder filled uniformly with [18F]-FDG (FDG) in water (BGD). Three 4.5cm diameter cylinders were inserted into the phantom: (C1) Teflon, (C2) Water+FDG (2:1) and (C3) Lumirem_100+FDG (2:1). Two 50mL syringes filled with Gadovist_02+FDG (Sy1) and water+FDG (Sy2) were attached to the sides of (C1) to mimick the effects of iv-contrast in vessels near bone. Syringe-to-background activity ratio was 4-to-1.PET emission data were acquired for 10min each using the PET/CT and the PET/MR. Images were reconstructed using CT- and MR-based attenuation correction (AC). Since Teflon is not correctly identified on MR, PET(/MR) data were reconstructed using MR-AC and CT-AC.RESULTS:Mean linear PET attenuation (cm-1) on TX was (a) 0.098, (b) 0.098, (c) 0.300, (d) 0.134, (e) 0.095, (f) 0.397 and (g) 0.105. Corresponding CT attenuation (HU) was: (a) 5, (b) 14, (c) 3070, (d) 1040, (e) 13, (f) 3070 and (g) 347.Lumirem had little effect on PET attenuation with (C3) being 13%, 10% and 11% higher than (C2) on PET/CT, PET/MR with MR-AC, and PET/MR with CT-AC, respectively. Gadovist_02 had even smaller effects with (Sy1) being 2.5% lower, 1.2% higher, and 3.5% lower than (Sy2) on PET/CT, PET/MR with MR-AC and PET/MR with CT-AC, respectively.CONCLUSION:MRCA in high and clinically relevant concentrations have attenuation values similar to that of CT contrast and water, respectively. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to significant attenuation of the PET emission signals.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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The effect of noise correlations in populations of diversely tuned neurons

Ecker, A., Berens, P., Tolias, A., Bethge, M.

Journal of Neuroscience, 31(40):14272-14283, October 2011 (article)

Abstract
The amount of information encoded by networks of neurons critically depends on the correlation structure of their activity. Neurons with similar stimulus preferences tend to have higher noise correlations than others. In homogeneous populations of neurons, this limited range correlation structure is highly detrimental to the accuracy of a population code. Therefore, reduced spike count correlations under attention, after adaptation, or after learning have been interpreted as evidence for a more efficient population code. Here, we analyze the role of limited range correlations in more realistic, heterogeneous population models. We use Fisher information and maximum-likelihood decoding to show that reduced correlations do not necessarily improve encoding accuracy. In fact, in populations with more than a few hundred neurons, increasing the level of limited range correlations can substantially improve encoding accuracy. We found that this improvement results from a decrease in noise entropy that is associated with increasing correlations if the marginal distributions are unchanged. Surprisingly, for constant noise entropy and in the limit of large populations, the encoding accuracy is independent of both structure and magnitude of noise correlations.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Analysis of Fixed-Point and Coordinate Descent Algorithms for Regularized Kernel Methods

Dinuzzo, F.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 22(10):1576-1587, October 2011 (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we analyze the convergence of two general classes of optimization algorithms for regularized kernel methods with convex loss function and quadratic norm regularization. The first methodology is a new class of algorithms based on fixed-point iterations that are well-suited for a parallel implementation and can be used with any convex loss function. The second methodology is based on coordinate descent, and generalizes some techniques previously proposed for linear support vector machines. It exploits the structure of additively separable loss functions to compute solutions of line searches in closed form. The two methodologies are both very easy to implement. In this paper, we also show how to remove non-differentiability of the objective functional by exactly reformulating a convex regularization problem as an unconstrained differentiable stabilization problem.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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A biomimetic approach to robot table tennis

Mülling, K., Kober, J., Peters, J.

Adaptive Behavior , 19(5):359-376 , October 2011 (article)

Abstract
Playing table tennis is a difficult motor task that requires fast movements, accurate control and adaptation to task parameters. Although human beings see and move slower than most robot systems, they significantly outperform all table tennis robots. One important reason for this higher performance is the human movement generation. In this paper, we study human movements during table tennis and present a robot system that mimics human striking behavior. Our focus lies on generating hitting motions capable of adapting to variations in environmental conditions, such as changes in ball speed and position. Therefore, we model the human movements involved in hitting a table tennis ball using discrete movement stages and the virtual hitting point hypothesis. The resulting model was evaluated both in a physically realistic simulation and on a real anthropomorphic seven degrees of freedom Barrett WAM™ robot arm.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]