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2009


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Online blind deconvolution for astronomical imaging

Harmeling, S., Hirsch, M., Sra, S., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the First IEEE International Conference Computational Photography (ICCP 2009), pages: 1-7, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, First IEEE International Conference on Computational Photography (ICCP), April 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Atmospheric turbulences blur astronomical images taken by earth-based telescopes. Taking many short-time exposures in such a situation provides noisy images of the same object, where each noisy image has a different blur. Commonly astronomers apply a technique called “Lucky Imaging” that selects a few of the recorded frames that fulfill certain criteria, such as reaching a certain peak intensity (“Strehl ratio”). The selected frames are then averaged to obtain a better image. In this paper we introduce and analyze a new method that exploits all the frames and generates an improved image in an online fashion. Our initial experiments with controlled artificial data and real-world astronomical datasets yields promising results.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

2009


PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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A kernel method for unsupervised structured network inference

Lippert, C., Stegle, O., Ghahramani, Z., Borgwardt, KM.

In JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings Volume 5: AISTATS 2009, pages: 368-375, (Editors: Van Dyk, D. , M. Welling), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twelfth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, April 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Network inference is the problem of inferring edges between a set of real-world objects, for instance, interactions between pairs of proteins in bioinformatics. Current kernel-based approaches to this problem share a set of common features: (i) they are supervised and hence require labeled training data; (ii) edges in the network are treated as mutually independent and hence topological properties are largely ignored; (iii) they lack a statistical interpretation. We argue that these common assumptions are often undesirable for network inference, and propose (i) an unsupervised kernel method (ii) that takes the global structure of the network into account and (iii) is statistically motivated. We show that our approach can explain commonly used heuristics in statistical terms. In experiments on social networks, different variants of our method demonstrate appealing predictive performance.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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PAC-Bayesian Generalization Bound for Density Estimation with Application to Co-clustering

Seldin, Y., Tishby, N.

In JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings Volume 5: AISTATS 2009, pages: 472-479, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 12th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, April 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We derive a PAC-Bayesian generalization bound for density estimation. Similar to the PAC-Bayesian generalization bound for classification, the result has the appealingly simple form of a tradeoff between empirical performance and the KL-divergence of the posterior from the prior. Moreover, the PAC-Bayesian generalization bound for classification can be derived as a special case of the bound for density estimation. To illustrate a possible application of our bound we derive a generalization bound for co-clustering. The bound provides a criterion to evaluate the ability of co-clustering to predict new co-occurrences, thus introducing a supervised flavor to this traditionally unsupervised task.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Efficient Bregman Range Search

Cayton, L.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 243-251, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We develop an algorithm for efficient range search when the notion of dissimilarity is given by a Bregman divergence. The range search task is to return all points in a potentially large database that are within some specified distance of a query. It arises in many learning algorithms such as locally-weighted regression, kernel density estimation, neighborhood graph-based algorithms, and in tasks like outlier detection and information retrieval. In metric spaces, efficient range search-like algorithms based on spatial data structures have been deployed on a variety of statistical tasks. Here we describe an algorithm for range search for an arbitrary Bregman divergence. This broad class of dissimilarity measures includes the relative entropy, Mahalanobis distance, Itakura-Saito divergence, and a variety of matrix divergences. Metric methods cannot be directly applied since Bregman divergences do not in general satisfy the triangle inequality. We derive geometric properties of Bregman divergences that yield an efficient algorithm for range search based on a recently proposed space decomposition for Bregman divergences.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Choice and Classifiability for RKHS Embeddings of Probability Distributions

Sriperumbudur, B., Fukumizu, K., Gretton, A., Lanckriet, G., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 1750-1758, (Editors: Y Bengio and D Schuurmans and J Lafferty and C Williams and A Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Embeddings of probability measures into reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces have been proposed as a straightforward and practical means of representing and comparing probabilities. In particular, the distance between embeddings (the maximum mean discrepancy, or MMD) has several key advantages over many classical metrics on distributions, namely easy computability, fast convergence and low bias of finite sample estimates. An important requirement of the embedding RKHS is that it be characteristic: in this case, the MMD between two distributions is zero if and only if the distributions coincide. Three new results on the MMD are introduced in the present study. First, it is established that MMD corresponds to the optimal risk of a kernel classifier, thus forming a natural link between the distance between distributions and their ease of classification. An important consequence is that a kernel must be characteristic to guarantee classifiability between distributions in the RKHS. Second, the class of characteristic kernels is broadened to incorporate all strictly positive definite kernels: these include non-translation invariant kernels and kernels on non-compact domains. Third, a generalization of the MMD is proposed for families of kernels, as the supremum over MMDs on a class of kernels (for instance the Gaussian kernels with different bandwidths). This extension is necessary to obtain a single distance measure if a large selection or class of characteristic kernels is potentially appropriate. This generalization is reasonable, given that it corresponds to the problem of learning the kernel by minimizing the risk of the corresponding kernel classifier. The generalized MMD is shown to have consistent finite sample estimates, and its performance is demonstrated on a homogeneity testing example.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Nonlinear directed acyclic structure learning with weakly additive noise models

Tillman, R., Gretton, A., Spirtes, P.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 1847-1855, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The recently proposed emph{additive noise model} has advantages over previous structure learning algorithms, when attempting to recover some true data generating mechanism, since it (i) does not assume linearity or Gaussianity and (ii) can recover a unique DAG rather than an equivalence class. However, its original extension to the multivariate case required enumerating all possible DAGs, and for some special distributions, e.g. linear Gaussian, the model is invertible and thus cannot be used for structure learning. We present a new approach which combines a PC style search using recent advances in kernel measures of conditional dependence with local searches for additive noise models in substructures of the equivalence class. This results in a more computationally efficient approach that is useful for arbitrary distributions even when additive noise models are invertible. Experiments with synthetic and real data show that this method is more accurate than previous methods when data are nonlinear and/or non-Gaussian.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Fast, Consistent Kernel Two-Sample Test

Gretton, A., Fukumizu, K., Harchaoui, Z., Sriperumbudur, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 673-681, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A kernel embedding of probability distributions into reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS) has recently been proposed, which allows the comparison of two probability measures P and Q based on the distance between their respective embeddings: for a sufficiently rich RKHS, this distance is zero if and only if P and Q coincide. In using this distance as a statistic for a test of whether two samples are from different distributions, a major difficulty arises in computing the significance threshold, since the empirical statistic has as its null distribution (where P = Q) an infinite weighted sum of x2 random variables. Prior finite sample approximations to the null distribution include using bootstrap resampling, which yields a consistent estimate but is computationally costly; and fitting a parametric model with the low order moments of the test statistic, which can work well in practice but has no consistency or accuracy guarantees. The main result of the present work is a novel estimate of the null distribution, computed from the eigenspectrum of the Gram matrix on the aggregate sample from P and Q, and having lower computational cost than the bootstrap. A proof of consistency of this estimate is provided. The performance of the null distribution estimate is compared with the bootstrap and parametric approaches on an artificial example, high dimensional multivariate data, and text.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Graphical models for decoding in BCI visual speller systems

Martens, S., Farquhar, J., Hill, J., Schölkopf, B.

In pages: 470-473, IEEE, 4th International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER), 2009 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Augmenting Feature-driven fMRI Analyses: Semi-supervised learning and resting state activity

Blaschko, M., Shelton, J., Bartels, A.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 126-134, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Resting state activity is brain activation that arises in the absence of any task, and is usually measured in awake subjects during prolonged fMRI scanning sessions where the only instruction given is to close the eyes and do nothing. It has been recognized in recent years that resting state activity is implicated in a wide variety of brain function. While certain networks of brain areas have different levels of activation at rest and during a task, there is nevertheless significant similarity between activations in the two cases. This suggests that recordings of resting state activity can be used as a source of unlabeled data to augment discriminative regression techniques in a semi-supervised setting. We evaluate this setting empirically yielding three main results: (i) regression tends to be improved by the use of Laplacian regularization even when no additional unlabeled data are available, (ii) resting state data seem to have a similar marginal distribution to that recorded during the execution of a visual processing task implying largely similar types of activation, and (iii) this source of information can be broadly exploited to improve the robustness of empirical inference in fMRI studies, an inherently data poor domain.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Fast subtree kernels on graphs

Shervashidze, N., Borgwardt, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 1660-1668, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this article, we propose fast subtree kernels on graphs. On graphs with n nodes and m edges and maximum degree d, these kernels comparing subtrees of height h can be computed in O(mh), whereas the classic subtree kernel by Ramon & G{\"a}rtner scales as O(n24dh). Key to this efficiency is the observation that the Weisfeiler-Lehman test of isomorphism from graph theory elegantly computes a subtree kernel as a byproduct. Our fast subtree kernels can deal with labeled graphs, scale up easily to large graphs and outperform state-of-the-art graph kernels on several classification benchmark datasets in terms of accuracy and runtime.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Path integral-based stochastic optimal control for rigid body dynamics

Theodorou, E. A., Buchli, J., Schaal, S.

In Adaptive Dynamic Programming and Reinforcement Learning, 2009. ADPRL ’09. IEEE Symposium on, pages: 219-225, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recent advances on path integral stochastic optimal control [1],[2] provide new insights in the optimal control of nonlinear stochastic systems which are linear in the controls, with state independent and time invariant control transition matrix. Under these assumptions, the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation is formulated and linearized with the use of the logarithmic transformation of the optimal value function. The resulting HJB is a linear second order partial differential equation which is solved by an approximation based on the Feynman-Kac formula [3]. In this work we review the theory of path integral control and derive the linearized HJB equation for systems with state dependent control transition matrix. In addition we derive the path integral formulation for the general class of systems with state dimensionality that is higher than the dimensionality of the controls. Furthermore, by means of a modified inverse dynamics controller, we apply path integral stochastic optimal control over the new control space. Simulations illustrate the theoretical results. Future developments and extensions are discussed.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning locomotion over rough terrain using terrain templates

Kalakrishnan, M., Buchli, J., Pastor, P., Schaal, S.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 167-172, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We address the problem of foothold selection in robotic legged locomotion over very rough terrain. The difficulty of the problem we address here is comparable to that of human rock-climbing, where foot/hand-hold selection is one of the most critical aspects. Previous work in this domain typically involves defining a reward function over footholds as a weighted linear combination of terrain features. However, a significant amount of effort needs to be spent in designing these features in order to model more complex decision functions, and hand-tuning their weights is not a trivial task. We propose the use of terrain templates, which are discretized height maps of the terrain under a foothold on different length scales, as an alternative to manually designed features. We describe an algorithm that can simultaneously learn a small set of templates and a foothold ranking function using these templates, from expert-demonstrated footholds. Using the LittleDog quadruped robot, we experimentally show that the use of terrain templates can produce complex ranking functions with higher performance than standard terrain features, and improved generalization to unseen terrain.

am

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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CESAR: A lunar crater exploration and sample return robot

Schwendner, J., Grimminger, F., Bartsch, S., Kaupisch, T., Yüksel, M., Bresser, A., Akpo, J. B., Seydel, M. K. -., Dieterle, A., Schmidt, S., Kirchner, F.

In 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 3355-3360, October 2009 (inproceedings)

am

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Concept Evaluation of a New Biologically Inspired Robot “Littleape”

Kühn, D., Römmermann, M., Sauthoff, N., Grimminger, F., Kirchner, F.

In Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 589–594, IROS’09, IEEE Press, 2009 (inproceedings)

am

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Compact models of motor primitive variations for predictible reaching and obstacle avoidance

Stulp, F., Oztop, E., Pastor, P., Beetz, M., Schaal, S.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2009), Paris, Dec.7-10, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
over and over again. This regularity allows humans and robots to reuse existing solutions for known recurring tasks. We expect that reusing a set of standard solutions to solve similar tasks will facilitate the design and on-line adaptation of the control systems of robots operating in human environments. In this paper, we derive a set of standard solutions for reaching behavior from human motion data. We also derive stereotypical reaching trajectories for variations of the task, in which obstacles are present. These stereotypical trajectories are then compactly represented with Dynamic Movement Primitives. On the humanoid robot Sarcos CB, this approach leads to reproducible, predictable, and human-like reaching motions.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Human optimization strategies under reward feedback

Hoffmann, H., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2009), Waikoloa, Hawaii, 2009, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Many hypothesis on human movement generation have been cast into an optimization framework, implying that movements are adapted to optimize a single quantity, like, e.g., jerk, end-point variance, or control cost. However, we still do not understand how humans actually learn when given only a cost or reward feedback at the end of a movement. Such a reinforcement learning setting has been extensively explored theoretically in engineering and computer science, but in human movement control, hardly any experiment studied movement learning under reward feedback. We present experiments probing which computational strategies humans use to optimize a movement under a continuous reward function. We present two experimental paradigms. The first paradigm mimics a ball-hitting task. Subjects (n=12) sat in front of a computer screen and moved a stylus on a tablet towards an unknown target. This target was located on a line that the subjects had to cross. During the movement, visual feedback was suppressed. After the movement, a reward was displayed graphically as a colored bar. As reward, we used a Gaussian function of the distance between the target location and the point of line crossing. We chose such a function since in sensorimotor tasks, the cost or loss function that humans seem to represent is close to an inverted Gaussian function (Koerding and Wolpert 2004). The second paradigm mimics pocket billiards. On the same experimental setup as above, the computer screen displayed a pocket (two bars), a white disk, and a green disk. The goal was to hit with the white disk the green disk (as in a billiard collision), such that the green disk moved into the pocket. Subjects (n=8) manipulated with the stylus the white disk to effectively choose start point and movement direction. Reward feedback was implicitly given as hitting or missing the pocket with the green disk. In both paradigms, subjects increased the average reward over trials. The surprising result was that in these experiments, humans seem to prefer a strategy that uses a reward-weighted average over previous movements instead of gradient ascent. The literature on reinforcement learning is dominated by gradient-ascent methods. However, our computer simulations and theoretical analysis revealed that reward-weighted averaging is the more robust choice given the amount of movement variance observed in humans. Apparently, humans choose an optimization strategy that is suitable for their own movement variance.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Concept evaluation of a new biologically inspired robot “LittleApe”

Kühn, D., Römmermann, M., Sauthoff, N., Grimminger, F., Kirchner, F.

In 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 589-594, October 2009 (inproceedings)

am

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Proprioceptive control of a hybrid legged-wheeled robot

Eich, M., Grimminger, F., Kirchner, F.

In 2008 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, pages: 774-779, February 2009 (inproceedings)

am

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Learning and generalization of motor skills by learning from demonstration

Pastor, P., Hoffmann, H., Asfour, T., Schaal, S.

In International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2009), Kobe, Japan, May 12-19, 2009, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We provide a general approach for learning robotic motor skills from human demonstration. To represent an observed movement, a non-linear differential equation is learned such that it reproduces this movement. Based on this representation, we build a library of movements by labeling each recorded movement according to task and context (e.g., grasping, placing, and releasing). Our differential equation is formulated such that generalization can be achieved simply by adapting a start and a goal parameter in the equation to the desired position values of a movement. For object manipulation, we present how our framework extends to the control of gripper orientation and finger position. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated in simulation as well as on a real robot. The robot learned a pick-and-place operation and a water-serving task and could generalize these tasks to novel situations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Compliant quadruped locomotion over rough terrain

Buchli, J., Kalakrishnan, M., Mistry, M., Pastor, P., Schaal, S.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 814-820, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Many critical elements for statically stable walking for legged robots have been known for a long time, including stability criteria based on support polygons, good foothold selection, recovery strategies to name a few. All these criteria have to be accounted for in the planning as well as the control phase. Most legged robots usually employ high gain position control, which means that it is crucially important that the planned reference trajectories are a good match for the actual terrain, and that tracking is accurate. Such an approach leads to conservative controllers, i.e. relatively low speed, ground speed matching, etc. Not surprisingly such controllers are not very robust - they are not suited for the real world use outside of the laboratory where the knowledge of the world is limited and error prone. Thus, to achieve robust robotic locomotion in the archetypical domain of legged systems, namely complex rough terrain, where the size of the obstacles are in the order of leg length, additional elements are required. A possible solution to improve the robustness of legged locomotion is to maximize the compliance of the controller. While compliance is trivially achieved by reduced feedback gains, for terrain requiring precise foot placement (e.g. climbing rocks, walking over pegs or cracks) compliance cannot be introduced at the cost of inferior tracking. Thus, model-based control and - in contrast to passive dynamic walkers - active balance control is required. To achieve these objectives, in this paper we add two crucial elements to legged locomotion, i.e., floating-base inverse dynamics control and predictive force control, and we show that these elements increase robustness in face of unknown and unanticipated perturbations (e.g. obstacles). Furthermore, we introduce a novel line-based COG trajectory planner, which yields a simpler algorithm than traditional polygon based methods and creates the appropriate input to our control system.We show results from bot- h simulation and real world of a robotic dog walking over non-perceived obstacles and rocky terrain. The results prove the effectivity of the inverse dynamics/force controller. The presented results show that we have all elements needed for robust all-terrain locomotion, which should also generalize to other legged systems, e.g., humanoid robots.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Inertial parameter estimation of floating-base humanoid systems using partial force sensing

Mistry, M., Schaal, S., Yamane, K.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2009), Paris, Dec.7-10, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, several controllers have been proposed for humanoid robots which rely on full-body dynamic models. The estimation of inertial parameters from data is a critical component for obtaining accurate models for control. However, floating base systems, such as humanoid robots, incur added challenges to this task (e.g. contact forces must be measured, contact states can change, etc.) In this work, we outline a theoretical framework for whole body inertial parameter estimation, including the unactuated floating base. Using a least squares minimization approach, conducted within the nullspace of unmeasured degrees of freedom, we are able to use a partial force sensor set for full-body estimation, e.g. using only joint torque sensors, allowing for estimation when contact force measurement is unavailable or unreliable (e.g. due to slipping, rolling contacts, etc.). We also propose how to determine the theoretical minimum force sensor set for full body estimation, and discuss the practical limitations of doing so.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

2001


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Unsupervised Segmentation and Classification of Mixtures of Markovian Sources

Seldin, Y., Bejerano, G., Tishby, N.

In The 33rd Symposium on the Interface of Computing Science and Statistics (Interface 2001 - Frontiers in Data Mining and Bioinformatics), pages: 1-15, 33rd Symposium on the Interface of Computing Science and Statistics (Interface - Frontiers in Data Mining and Bioinformatics), 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe a novel algorithm for unsupervised segmentation of sequences into alternating Variable Memory Markov sources, first presented in [SBT01]. The algorithm is based on competitive learning between Markov models, when implemented as Prediction Suffix Trees [RST96] using the MDL principle. By applying a model clustering procedure, based on rate distortion theory combined with deterministic annealing, we obtain a hierarchical segmentation of sequences between alternating Markov sources. The method is applied successfully to unsupervised segmentation of multilingual texts into languages where it is able to infer correctly both the number of languages and the language switching points. When applied to protein sequence families (results of the [BSMT01] work), we demonstrate the method‘s ability to identify biologically meaningful sub-sequences within the proteins, which correspond to signatures of important functional sub-units called domains. Our approach to proteins classification (through the obtained signatures) is shown to have both conceptual and practical advantages over the currently used methods.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2001


PDF Web [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Sequence Segmentation by a Mixture of Switching Variable Memory Markov Sources

Seldin, Y., Bejerano, G., Tishby, N.

In In the proceeding of the 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML 2001), pages: 513-520, 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a novel information theoretic algorithm for unsupervised segmentation of sequences into alternating Variable Memory Markov sources. The algorithm is based on competitive learning between Markov models, when implemented as Prediction Suffix Trees (Ron et al., 1996) using the MDL principle. By applying a model clustering procedure, based on rate distortion theory combined with deterministic annealing, we obtain a hierarchical segmentation of sequences between alternating Markov sources. The algorithm seems to be self regulated and automatically avoids over segmentation. The method is applied successfully to unsupervised segmentation of multilingual texts into languages where it is able to infer correctly both the number of languages and the language switching points. When applied to protein sequence families, we demonstrate the method‘s ability to identify biologically meaningful sub-sequences within the proteins, which correspond to important functional sub-units called domains.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Humanoid oculomotor control based on concepts of computational neuroscience

Shibata, T., Vijayakumar, S., Conradt, J., Schaal, S.

In Humanoids2001, Second IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Oculomotor control in a humanoid robot faces similar problems as biological oculomotor systems, i.e., the stabilization of gaze in face of unknown perturbations of the body, selective attention, the complexity of stereo vision and dealing with large information processing delays. In this paper, we suggest control circuits to realize three of the most basic oculomotor behaviors - the vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflex (VOR-OKR) for gaze stabilization, smooth pursuit for tracking moving objects, and saccades for overt visual attention. Each of these behaviors was derived from inspirations from computational neuroscience, which proves to be a viable strategy to explore novel control mechanisms for humanoid robotics. Our implementations on a humanoid robot demonstrate good performance of the oculomotor behaviors that appears natural and human-like.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Trajectory formation for imitation with nonlinear dynamical systems

Ijspeert, A., Nakanishi, J., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2001), pages: 752-757, Weilea, Hawaii, Oct.29-Nov.3, 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
This article explores a new approach to learning by imitation and trajectory formation by representing movements as mixtures of nonlinear differential equations with well-defined attractor dynamics. An observed movement is approximated by finding a best fit of the mixture model to its data by a recursive least squares regression technique. In contrast to non-autonomous movement representations like splines, the resultant movement plan remains an autonomous set of nonlinear differential equations that forms a control policy which is robust to strong external perturbations and that can be modified by additional perceptual variables. This movement policy remains the same for a given target, regardless of the initial conditions, and can easily be re-used for new targets. We evaluate the trajectory formation system (TFS) in the context of a humanoid robot simulation that is part of the Virtual Trainer (VT) project, which aims at supervising rehabilitation exercises in stroke-patients. A typical rehabilitation exercise was collected with a Sarcos Sensuit, a device to record joint angular movement from human subjects, and approximated and reproduced with our imitation techniques. Our results demonstrate that multi-joint human movements can be encoded successfully, and that this system allows robust modifications of the movement policy through external variables.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Real-time statistical learning for robotics and human augmentation

Schaal, S., Vijayakumar, S., D’Souza, A., Ijspeert, A., Nakanishi, J.

In International Symposium on Robotics Research, (Editors: Jarvis, R. A.;Zelinsky, A.), Lorne, Victoria, Austrialia Nov.9-12, 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Real-time modeling of complex nonlinear dynamic processes has become increasingly important in various areas of robotics and human augmentation. To address such problems, we have been developing special statistical learning methods that meet the demands of on-line learning, in particular the need for low computational complexity, rapid learning, and scalability to high-dimensional spaces. In this paper, we introduce a novel algorithm that possesses all the necessary properties by combining methods from probabilistic and nonparametric learning. We demonstrate the applicability of our methods for three different applications in humanoid robotics, i.e., the on-line learning of a full-body inverse dynamics model, an inverse kinematics model, and imitation learning. The latter application will also introduce a novel method to shape attractor landscapes of dynamical system by means of statis-tical learning.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Robust learning of arm trajectories through human demonstration

Billard, A., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2001), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, Maui, Hawaii, Oct.29-Nov.3, 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a model, composed of hierarchy of artificial neural networks, for robot learning by demonstration. The model is implemented in a dynamic simulation of a 41 degrees of freedom humanoid for reproducing 3D human motion of the arm. Results show that the model requires few information about the desired trajectory and learns on-line the relevant features of movement. It can generalize across a small set of data to produce a qualitatively good reproduction of the demonstrated trajectory. Finally, it is shown that reproduction of the trajectory after learning is robust against perturbations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Overt visual attention for a humanoid robot

Vijayakumar, S., Conradt, J., Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2001), 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of our research is to investigate the interplay between oculomotor control, visual processing, and limb control in humans and primates by exploring the computational issues of these processes with a biologically inspired artificial oculomotor system on an anthropomorphic robot. In this paper, we investigate the computational mechanisms for visual attention in such a system. Stimuli in the environment excite a dynamical neural network that implements a saliency map, i.e., a winner-take-all competition between stimuli while simultenously smoothing out noise and suppressing irrelevant inputs. In real-time, this system computes new targets for the shift of gaze, executed by the head-eye system of the robot. The redundant degrees-of- freedom of the head-eye system are resolved through a learned inverse kinematics with optimization criterion. We also address important issues how to ensure that the coordinate system of the saliency map remains correct after movement of the robot. The presented attention system is built on principled modules and generally applicable for any sensory modality.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning inverse kinematics

D’Souza, A., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2001), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, Maui, Hawaii, Oct.29-Nov.3, 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Real-time control of the endeffector of a humanoid robot in external coordinates requires computationally efficient solutions of the inverse kinematics problem. In this context, this paper investigates learning of inverse kinematics for resolved motion rate control (RMRC) employing an optimization criterion to resolve kinematic redundancies. Our learning approach is based on the key observations that learning an inverse of a non uniquely invertible function can be accomplished by augmenting the input representation to the inverse model and by using a spatially localized learning approach. We apply this strategy to inverse kinematics learning and demonstrate how a recently developed statistical learning algorithm, Locally Weighted Projection Regression, allows efficient learning of inverse kinematic mappings in an incremental fashion even when input spaces become rather high dimensional. The resulting performance of the inverse kinematics is comparable to Liegeois ([1]) analytical pseudo inverse with optimization. Our results are illustrated with a 30 degree-of-freedom humanoid robot.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Biomimetic smooth pursuit based on fast learning of the target dynamics

Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2001), 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Following a moving target with a narrow-view foveal vision system is one of the essential oculomotor behaviors of humans and humanoids. This oculomotor behavior, called ``Smooth Pursuit'', requires accurate tracking control which cannot be achieved by a simple visual negative feedback controller due to the significant delays in visual information processing. In this paper, we present a biologically inspired and control theoretically sound smooth pursuit controller consisting of two cascaded subsystems. One is an inverse model controller for the oculomotor system, and the other is a learning controller for the dynamics of the visual target. The latter controller learns how to predict the target's motion in head coordinates such that tracking performance can be improved. We investigate our smooth pursuit system in simulations and experiments on a humanoid robot. By using a fast on-line statistical learning network, our humanoid oculomotor system is able to acquire high performance smooth pursuit after about 5 seconds of learning despite significant processing delays in the syste

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

1997


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Learning from demonstration

Schaal, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9, pages: 1040-1046, (Editors: Mozer, M. C.;Jordan, M.;Petsche, T.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1997, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
By now it is widely accepted that learning a task from scratch, i.e., without any prior knowledge, is a daunting undertaking. Humans, however, rarely attempt to learn from scratch. They extract initial biases as well as strategies how to approach a learning problem from instructions and/or demonstrations of other humans. For learning control, this paper investigates how learning from demonstration can be applied in the context of reinforcement learning. We consider priming the Q-function, the value function, the policy, and the model of the task dynamics as possible areas where demonstrations can speed up learning. In general nonlinear learning problems, only model-based reinforcement learning shows significant speed-up after a demonstration, while in the special case of linear quadratic regulator (LQR) problems, all methods profit from the demonstration. In an implementation of pole balancing on a complex anthropomorphic robot arm, we demonstrate that, when facing the complexities of real signal processing, model-based reinforcement learning offers the most robustness for LQR problems. Using the suggested methods, the robot learns pole balancing in just a single trial after a 30 second long demonstration of the human instructor. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

1997


link (url) [BibTex]


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Robot learning from demonstration

Atkeson, C. G., Schaal, S.

In Machine Learning: Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Conference (ICML ’97), pages: 12-20, (Editors: Fisher Jr., D. H.), Morgan Kaufmann, Nashville, TN, July 8-12, 1997, 1997, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of robot learning from demonstration is to have a robot learn from watching a demonstration of the task to be performed. In our approach to learning from demonstration the robot learns a reward function from the demonstration and a task model from repeated attempts to perform the task. A policy is computed based on the learned reward function and task model. Lessons learned from an implementation on an anthropomorphic robot arm using a pendulum swing up task include 1) simply mimicking demonstrated motions is not adequate to perform this task, 2) a task planner can use a learned model and reward function to compute an appropriate policy, 3) this model-based planning process supports rapid learning, 4) both parametric and nonparametric models can be learned and used, and 5) incorporating a task level direct learning component, which is non-model-based, in addition to the model-based planner, is useful in compensating for structural modeling errors and slow model learning. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Local dimensionality reduction for locally weighted learning

Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Robotics and Automation, pages: 220-225, Monteray, CA, July10-11, 1997, 1997, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Incremental learning of sensorimotor transformations in high dimensional spaces is one of the basic prerequisites for the success of autonomous robot devices as well as biological movement systems. So far, due to sparsity of data in high dimensional spaces, learning in such settings requires a significant amount of prior knowledge about the learning task, usually provided by a human expert. In this paper we suggest a partial revision of the view. Based on empirical studies, it can been observed that, despite being globally high dimensional and sparse, data distributions from physical movement systems are locally low dimensional and dense. Under this assumption, we derive a learning algorithm, Locally Adaptive Subspace Regression, that exploits this property by combining a local dimensionality reduction as a preprocessing step with a nonparametric learning technique, locally weighted regression. The usefulness of the algorithm and the validity of its assumptions are illustrated for a synthetic data set and data of the inverse dynamics of an actual 7 degree-of-freedom anthropomorphic robot arm.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning tasks from a single demonstration

Atkeson, C. G., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA97), 2, pages: 1706-1712, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, Albuquerque, NM, 20-25 April, 1997, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Learning a complex dynamic robot manoeuvre from a single human demonstration is difficult. This paper explores an approach to learning from demonstration based on learning an optimization criterion from the demonstration and a task model from repeated attempts to perform the task, and using the learned criterion and model to compute an appropriate robot movement. A preliminary version of the approach has been implemented on an anthropomorphic robot arm using a pendulum swing up task as an example

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

1995


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A kendama learning robot based on a dynamic optimization theory

Miyamoto, H., Gandolfo, F., Gomi, H., Schaal, S., Koike, Y., Osu, R., Nakano, E., Kawato, M.

In Preceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Communication (RO-MAN’95), pages: 327-332, Tokyo, July 1995, clmc (inproceedings)

am

[BibTex]

1995


[BibTex]