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2004


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Learning kernels from biological networks by maximizing entropy

Tsuda, K., Noble, W.

Bioinformatics, 20(Suppl. 1):i326-i333, August 2004 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: The diffusion kernel is a general method for computing pairwise distances among all nodes in a graph, based on the sum of weighted paths between each pair of nodes. This technique has been used successfully, in conjunction with kernel-based learning methods, to draw inferences from several types of biological networks. Results: We show that computing the diffusion kernel is equivalent to maximizing the von Neumann entropy, subject to a global constraint on the sum of the Euclidean distances between nodes. This global constraint allows for high variance in the pairwise distances. Accordingly, we propose an alternative, locally constrained diffusion kernel, and we demonstrate that the resulting kernel allows for more accurate support vector machine prediction of protein functional classifications from metabolic and protein–protein interaction networks.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2004


PDF Web [BibTex]


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Masking effect produced by Mach bands on the detection of narrow bars of random polarity

Henning, GB., Hoddinott, KT., Wilson-Smith, ZJ., Hill, NJ.

Journal of the Optical Society of America, 21(8):1379-1387, A, August 2004 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Support Vector Channel Selection in BCI

Lal, T., Schröder, M., Hinterberger, T., Weston, J., Bogdan, M., Birbaumer, N., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 51(6):1003-1010, June 2004 (article)

Abstract
Designing a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system one can choose from a variety of features that may be useful for classifying brain activity during a mental task. For the special case of classifying EEG signals we propose the usage of the state of the art feature selection algorithms Recursive Feature Elimination and Zero-Norm Optimization which are based on the training of Support Vector Machines (SVM). These algorithms can provide more accurate solutions than standard filter methods for feature selection. We adapt the methods for the purpose of selecting EEG channels. For a motor imagery paradigm we show that the number of used channels can be reduced significantly without increasing the classification error. The resulting best channels agree well with the expected underlying cortical activity patterns during the mental tasks. Furthermore we show how time dependent task specific information can be visualized.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Distance-Based Classification with Lipschitz Functions

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 5, pages: 669-695, June 2004 (article)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to develop a framework for large margin classification in metric spaces. We want to find a generalization of linear decision functions for metric spaces and define a corresponding notion of margin such that the decision function separates the training points with a large margin. It will turn out that using Lipschitz functions as decision functions, the inverse of the Lipschitz constant can be interpreted as the size of a margin. In order to construct a clean mathematical setup we isometrically embed the given metric space into a Banach space and the space of Lipschitz functions into its dual space. To analyze the resulting algorithm, we prove several representer theorems. They state that there always exist solutions of the Lipschitz classifier which can be expressed in terms of distance functions to training points. We provide generalization bounds for Lipschitz classifiers in terms of the Rademacher complexities of some Lipschitz function classes. The generality of our approach can be seen from the fact that several well-known algorithms are special cases of the Lipschitz classifier, among them the support vector machine, the linear programming machine, and the 1-nearest neighbor classifier.

ei

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]


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Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16: Proceedings of the 2003 Conference

Thrun, S., Saul, L., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS 2003), pages: 1621, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 17th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (proceedings)

Abstract
The annual Neural Information Processing (NIPS) conference is the flagship meeting on neural computation. It draws a diverse group of attendees—physicists, neuroscientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computer scientists. The presentations are interdisciplinary, with contributions in algorithms, learning theory, cognitive science, neuroscience, brain imaging, vision, speech and signal processing, reinforcement learning and control, emerging technologies, and applications. Only thirty percent of the papers submitted are accepted for presentation at NIPS, so the quality is exceptionally high. This volume contains all the papers presented at the 2003 conference.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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cDNA-Microarray Technology in Cartilage Research - Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis [in German]

Aigner, T., Finger, F., Zien, A., Bartnik, E.

Zeitschrift f{\"u}r Orthop{\"a}die und ihre Grenzgebiete, 142(2):241-247, April 2004 (article)

Abstract
Functional genomics represents a new challenging approach in order to analyze complex diseases such as osteoarthritis on a molecular level. The characterization of the molecular changes of the cartilage cells, the chondrocytes, enables a better understanding of the pathomechanisms of the disease. In particular, the identification and characterization of new target molecules for therapeutic intervention is of interest. Also, potential molecular markers for diagnosis and monitoring of osteoarthritis contribute to a more appropriate patient management. The DNA-microarray technology complements (but does not replace) biochemical and biological research in new disease-relevant genes. Large-scale functional genomics will identify molecular networks such as yet identified players in the anabolic-catabolic balance of articular cartilage as well as disease-relevant intracellular signaling cascades so far rather unknown in articular chondrocytes. However, at the moment it is also important to recognize the limitations of the microarray technology in order to avoid over-interpretation of the results. This might lead to misleading results and prevent to a significant extent a proper use of the potential of this technology in the field of osteoarthritis.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Compression Approach to Support Vector Model Selection

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O., Schölkopf, B.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 5, pages: 293-323, April 2004 (article)

Abstract
In this paper we investigate connections between statistical learning theory and data compression on the basis of support vector machine (SVM) model selection. Inspired by several generalization bounds we construct "compression coefficients" for SVMs which measure the amount by which the training labels can be compressed by a code built from the separating hyperplane. The main idea is to relate the coding precision to geometrical concepts such as the width of the margin or the shape of the data in the feature space. The so derived compression coefficients combine well known quantities such as the radius-margin term R^2/rho^2, the eigenvalues of the kernel matrix, and the number of support vectors. To test whether they are useful in practice we ran model selection experiments on benchmark data sets. As a result we found that compression coefficients can fairly accurately predict the parameters for which the test error is minimized.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Experimentally optimal v in support vector regression for different noise models and parameter settings

Chalimourda, A., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

Neural Networks, 17(1):127-141, January 2004 (article)

Abstract
In Support Vector (SV) regression, a parameter ν controls the number of Support Vectors and the number of points that come to lie outside of the so-called var epsilon-insensitive tube. For various noise models and SV parameter settings, we experimentally determine the values of ν that lead to the lowest generalization error. We find good agreement with the values that had previously been predicted by a theoretical argument based on the asymptotic efficiency of a simplified model of SV regression. As a side effect of the experiments, valuable information about the generalization behavior of the remaining SVM parameters and their dependencies is gained. The experimental findings are valid even for complex ‘real-world’ data sets. Based on our results on the role of the ν-SVM parameters, we discuss various model selection methods.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Protein ranking: from local to global structure in the protein similarity network

Weston, J., Elisseeff, A., Zhou, D., Leslie, C., Noble, W.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 101(17):6559-6563, 2004 (article)

Abstract
Biologists regularly search databases of DNA or protein sequences for evolutionary or functional relationships to a given query sequence. We describe a ranking algorithm that exploits the entire network structure of similarity relationships among proteins in a sequence database by performing a diffusion operation on a pre-computed, weighted network. The resulting ranking algorithm, evaluated using a human-curated database of protein structures, is efficient and provides significantly better rankings than a local network search algorithm such as PSI-BLAST.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Statistical Performance of Support Vector Machines

Blanchard, G., Bousquet, O., Massart, P.

2004 (article)

ei

PostScript [BibTex]


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Asymptotic Properties of the Fisher Kernel

Tsuda, K., Akaho, S., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 16(1):115-137, 2004 (article)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Some observations on the effects of slant and texture type on slant-from-texture

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Vision Research, 44(13):1511-1535, 2004 (article)

Abstract
We measure the performance of five subjects in a slant-discrimination task for differently textured planes. As textures we used uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, circles (polka dots), Voronoi tessellations, plaids, 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a leopard skin-like texture. Our results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) Thus, following from (1), cases of “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular orientation. (3) For orientations sufficiently slanted, the different textures do not elicit major differences in performance, (4) while for orientations closer to the vertical plane there are marked differences between them. (5) These differences allow a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness”– that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the plane. Polka dots tend to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst. Two additional experiments were conducted to test the generality of the obtained rank-order. First, the tilt of the planes was rotated to break the axis of gravity present in the original discrimination experiment. Second, the task was changed to a slant report task via probe adjustment. The results of both control experiments confirmed the texture-based rank-order previously obtained. We comment on the importance of these results for depth perception research in general, and in particular the implications our results have for studies of cue combination (sensor fusion) using texture as one of the cues involved.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Minimizing the Cross Validation Error to Mix Kernel Matrices of Heterogeneous Biological Data

Tsuda, K., Uda, S., Kin, T., Asai, K.

Neural Processing Letters, 19, pages: 63-72, 2004 (article)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A Tutorial on Support Vector Regression

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

Statistics and Computing, 14(3):199-222, 2004 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Bayesian analysis of the Scatterometer Wind Retrieval Inverse Problem: Some New Approaches

Cornford, D., Csato, L., Evans, D., Opper, M.

Journal of the Royal Statistical Society B, 66, pages: 1-17, 3, 2004 (article)

Abstract
The retrieval of wind vectors from satellite scatterometer observations is a non-linear inverse problem.A common approach to solving inverse problems is to adopt a Bayesian framework and to infer the posterior distribution of the parameters of interest given the observations by using a likelihood model relating the observations to the parameters, and a prior distribution over the parameters.We show how Gaussian process priors can be used efficiently with a variety of likelihood models, using local forward (observation) models and direct inverse models for the scatterometer.We present an enhanced Markov chain Monte Carlo method to sample from the resulting multimodal posterior distribution.We go on to show how the computational complexity of the inference can be controlled by using a sparse, sequential Bayes algorithm for estimation with Gaussian processes.This helps to overcome the most serious barrier to the use of probabilistic, Gaussian process methods in remote sensing inverse problems, which is the prohibitively large size of the data sets.We contrast the sampling results with the approximations that are found by using the sparse, sequential Bayes algorithm.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Feature Selection for Support Vector Machines Using Genetic Algorithms

Fröhlich, H., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

International Journal on Artificial Intelligence Tools (Special Issue on Selected Papers from the 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence 2003), 13(4):791-800, 2004 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Phenotypic Characterization of Human Chondrocyte Cell Line C-20/A4: A Comparison between Monolayer and Alginate Suspension Culture

Finger, F., Schorle, C., Söder, S., Zien, A., Goldring, M., Aigner, T.

Cells Tissues Organs, 178(2):65-77, 2004 (article)

Abstract
DNA microarray analysis was used to investigate the molecular phenotype of one of the first human chondrocyte cell lines, C-20/A4, derived from juvenile costal chondrocytes by immortalization with origin-defective simian virus 40 large T antigen. Clontech Human Cancer Arrays 1.2 and quantitative PCR were used to examine gene expression profiles of C-20/A4 cells cultured in the presence of serum in monolayer and alginate beads. In monolayer cultures, genes involved in cell proliferation were strongly upregulated compared to those expressed by human adult articular chondrocytes in primary culture. Of the cell cycle-regulated genes, only two, the CDK regulatory subunit and histone H4, were downregulated after culture in alginate beads, consistent with the ability of these cells to proliferate in suspension culture. In contrast, the expression of several genes that are involved in pericellular matrix formation, including MMP-14, COL6A1, fibronectin, biglycan and decorin, was upregulated when the C-20/A4 cells were transferred to suspension culture in alginate. Also, nexin-1, vimentin, and IGFBP-3, which are known to be expressed by primary chondrocytes, were differentially expressed in our study. Consistent with the proliferative phenotype of this cell line, few genes involved in matrix synthesis and turnover were highly expressed in the presence of serum. These results indicate that immortalized chondrocyte cell lines, rather than substituting for primary chondrocytes, may serve as models for extending findings on chondrocyte function not achievable by the use of primary chondrocytes.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Methods and their Potential Use in Signal Processing

Perez-Cruz, F., Bousquet, O.

IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, (Special issue on Signal Processing for Mining), 2004 (article) Accepted

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Discovering optimal imitation strategies

Billard, A., Epars, Y., Calinon, S., Cheng, G., Schaal, S.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 47(2-3):68-77, 2004, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper develops a general policy for learning relevant features of an imitation task. We restrict our study to imitation of manipulative tasks or of gestures. The imitation process is modeled as a hierarchical optimization system, which minimizes the discrepancy between two multi-dimensional datasets. To classify across manipulation strategies, we apply a probabilistic analysis to data in Cartesian and joint spaces. We determine a general metric that optimizes the policy of task reproduction, following strategy determination. The model successfully discovers strategies in six different imitative tasks and controls task reproduction by a full body humanoid robot.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Rhythmic movement is not discrete

Schaal, S., Sternad, D., Osu, R., Kawato, M.

Nature Neuroscience, 7(10):1137-1144, 2004, clmc (article)

Abstract
Rhythmic movements, like walking, chewing, or scratching, are phylogenetically old mo-tor behaviors found in many organisms, ranging from insects to primates. In contrast, discrete movements, like reaching, grasping, or kicking, are behaviors that have reached sophistication primarily in younger species, particularly in primates. Neurophysiological and computational research on arm motor control has focused almost exclusively on dis-crete movements, essentially assuming similar neural circuitry for rhythmic tasks. In con-trast, many behavioral studies focused on rhythmic models, subsuming discrete move-ment as a special case. Here, using a human functional neuroimaging experiment, we show that in addition to areas activated in rhythmic movement, discrete movement in-volves several higher cortical planning areas, despite both movement conditions were confined to the same single wrist joint. These results provide the first neuroscientific evi-dence that rhythmic arm movement cannot be part of a more general discrete movement system, and may require separate neurophysiological and theoretical treatment.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning from demonstration and adaptation of biped locomotion

Nakanishi, J., Morimoto, J., Endo, G., Cheng, G., Schaal, S., Kawato, M.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 47(2-3):79-91, 2004, clmc (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we introduce a framework for learning biped locomotion using dynamical movement primitives based on non-linear oscillators. Our ultimate goal is to establish a design principle of a controller in order to achieve natural human-like locomotion. We suggest dynamical movement primitives as a central pattern generator (CPG) of a biped robot, an approach we have previously proposed for learning and encoding complex human movements. Demonstrated trajectories are learned through movement primitives by locally weighted regression, and the frequency of the learned trajectories is adjusted automatically by a novel frequency adaptation algorithmbased on phase resetting and entrainment of coupled oscillators. Numerical simulations and experimental implementation on a physical robot demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed locomotioncontroller.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Feedback error learning and nonlinear adaptive control

Nakanishi, J., Schaal, S.

Neural Networks, 17(10):1453-1465, 2004, clmc (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we present our theoretical investigations of the technique of feedback error learning (FEL) from the viewpoint of adaptive control. We first discuss the relationship between FEL and nonlinear adaptive control with adaptive feedback linearization, and show that FEL can be interpreted as a form of nonlinear adaptive control. Second, we present a Lyapunov analysis suggesting that the condition of strictly positive realness (SPR) associated with the tracking error dynamics is a sufficient condition for asymptotic stability of the closed-loop dynamics. Specifically, for a class of second order SISO systems, we show that this condition reduces to KD^2 > KP; where KP and KD are positive position and velocity feedback gains, respectively. Moreover, we provide a ÔpassivityÕ-based stability analysis which suggests that SPR of the tracking error dynamics is a necessary and sufficient condition for asymptotic hyperstability. Thus, the condition KD^2>KP mentioned above is not only a sufficient but also necessary condition to guarantee asymptotic hyperstability of FEL, i.e. the tracking error is bounded and asymptotically converges to zero. As a further point, we explore the adaptive control and FEL framework for feedforward control formulations, and derive an additional sufficient condition for asymptotic stability in the sense of Lyapunov. Finally, we present numerical simulations to illustrate the stability properties of FEL obtained from our mathematical analysis.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

2001


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Regularized principal manifolds

Smola, A., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 1, pages: 179-209, June 2001 (article)

Abstract
Many settings of unsupervised learning can be viewed as quantization problems - the minimization of the expected quantization error subject to some restrictions. This allows the use of tools such as regularization from the theory of (supervised) risk minimization for unsupervised learning. This setting turns out to be closely related to principal curves, the generative topographic map, and robust coding. We explore this connection in two ways: (1) we propose an algorithm for finding principal manifolds that can be regularized in a variety of ways; and (2) we derive uniform convergence bounds and hence bounds on the learning rates of the algorithm. In particular, we give bounds on the covering numbers which allows us to obtain nearly optimal learning rates for certain types of regularization operators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the approach.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

2001


PDF [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: II. Bootstrap-based confidence intervals and sampling

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1314-1329, 2001 (article)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: I. Fitting, sampling and goodness-of-fit

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1293-1313, 2001 (article)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer'sperformance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. This paper, together with its companion paper (Wichmann & Hill, 2001), describes an integrated approach to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing the goodness of fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function'sparameters and other estimates derived from them, for the purposes of hypothesis testing. The present paper deals with the first two topics, describing a constrained maximum-likelihood method of parameter estimation and developing several goodness-of-fit tests. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we deal with two specific difficulties that arise when fitting functions to psychophysical data. First, we note that human observers are prone to stimulus-independent errors (or lapses ). We show that failure to account for this can lead to serious biases in estimates of the psychometric function'sparameters and illustrate how the problem may be overcome. Second, we note that psychophysical data sets are usually rather small by the standards required by most of the commonly applied statistical tests. We demonstrate the potential errors of applying traditional X^2 methods to psychophysical data and advocate use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory. We have made available the software to implement our methods

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Markovian domain fingerprinting: statistical segmentation of protein sequences

Bejerano, G., Seldin, Y., Margalit, H., Tishby, N.

Bioinformatics, 17(10):927-934, 2001 (article)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Synchronized robot drumming by neural oscillator

Kotosaka, S., Schaal, S.

Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan, 19(1):116-123, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Sensory-motor integration is one of the key issues in robotics. In this paper, we propose an approach to rhythmic arm movement control that is synchronized with an external signal based on exploiting a simple neural oscillator network. Trajectory generation by the neural oscillator is a biologically inspired method that can allow us to generate a smooth and continuous trajectory. The parameter tuning of the oscillators is used to generate a synchronized movement with wide intervals. We adopted the method for the drumming task as an example task. By using this method, the robot can realize synchronized drumming with wide drumming intervals in real time. The paper also shows the experimental results of drumming by a humanoid robot.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Origins and violations of the 2/3 power law in rhythmic 3D movements

Schaal, S., Sternad, D.

Experimental Brain Research, 136, pages: 60-72, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
The 2/3 power law, the nonlinear relationship between tangential velocity and radius of curvature of the endeffector trajectory, has been suggested as a fundamental constraint of the central nervous system in the formation of rhythmic endpoint trajectories. However, studies on the 2/3 power law have largely been confined to planar drawing patterns of relatively small size. With the hypothesis that this strategy overlooks nonlinear effects that are constitutive in movement generation, the present experiments tested the validity of the power law in elliptical patterns which were not confined to a planar surface and which were performed by the unconstrained 7-DOF arm with significant variations in pattern size and workspace orientation. Data were recorded from five human subjects where the seven joint angles and the endpoint trajectories were analyzed. Additionally, an anthropomorphic 7-DOF robot arm served as a "control subject" whose endpoint trajectories were generated on the basis of the human joint angle data, modeled as simple harmonic oscillations. Analyses of the endpoint trajectories demonstrate that the power law is systematically violated with increasing pattern size, in both exponent and the goodness of fit. The origins of these violations can be explained analytically based on smooth rhythmic trajectory formation and the kinematic structure of the human arm. We conclude that in unconstrained rhythmic movements, the power law seems to be a by-product of a movement system that favors smooth trajectories, and that it is unlikely to serve as a primary movement generating principle. Our data rather suggests that subjects employed smooth oscillatory pattern generators in joint space to realize the required movement patterns.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Graph-matching vs. entropy-based methods for object detection
Neural Networks, 14(3):345-354, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Labeled Graph Matching (LGM) has been shown successful in numerous ob-ject vision tasks. This method is the basis for arguably the best face recognition system in the world. We present an algorithm for visual pattern recognition that is an extension of LGM ("LGM+"). We compare the performance of LGM and LGM+ algorithms with a state of the art statistical method based on Mutual Information Maximization (MIM). We present an adaptation of the MIM method for multi-dimensional Gabor wavelet features. The three pattern recognition methods were evaluated on an object detection task, using a set of stimuli on which none of the methods had been tested previously. The results indicate that while the performance of the MIM method operating upon Gabor wavelets is superior to the same method operating on pixels and to LGM, it is surpassed by LGM+. LGM+ offers a significant improvement in performance over LGM without losing LGMâ??s virtues of simplicity, biological plausibility, and a computational cost that is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the MIM algorithm. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Biomimetic gaze stabilization based on feedback-error learning with nonparametric regression networks

Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

Neural Networks, 14(2):201-216, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Oculomotor control in a humanoid robot faces similar problems as biological oculomotor systems, i.e. the stabilization of gaze in face of unknown perturbations of the body, selective attention, stereo vision, and dealing with large information processing delays. Given the nonlinearities of the geometry of binocular vision as well as the possible nonlinearities of the oculomotor plant, it is desirable to accomplish accurate control of these behaviors through learning approaches. This paper develops a learning control system for the phylogenetically oldest behaviors of oculomotor control, the stabilization reflexes of gaze. In a step-wise procedure, we demonstrate how control theoretic reasonable choices of control components result in an oculomotor control system that resembles the known functional anatomy of the primate oculomotor system. The core of the learning system is derived from the biologically inspired principle of feedback-error learning combined with a state-of-the-art non-parametric statistical learning network. With this circuitry, we demonstrate that our humanoid robot is able to acquire high performance visual stabilization reflexes after about 40 s of learning despite significant nonlinearities and processing delays in the system.

am

link (url) [BibTex]


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Fast learning of biomimetic oculomotor control with nonparametric regression networks (in Japanese)

Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan, 19(4):468-479, 2001, clmc (article)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bouncing a ball: Tuning into dynamic stability

Sternad, D., Duarte, M., Katsumata, H., Schaal, S.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(5):1163-1184, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Rhythmically bouncing a ball with a racket was investigated and modeled with a nonlinear map. Model analyses provided a variable defining a dynamically stable solution that obviates computationally expensive corrections. Three experiments evaluated whether dynamic stability is optimized and what perceptual support is necessary for stable behavior. Two hypotheses were tested: (a) Performance is stable if racket acceleration is negative at impact, and (b) variability is lowest at an impact acceleration between -4 and -1 m/s2. In Experiment 1 participants performed the task, eyes open or closed, bouncing a ball confined to a 1-dimensional trajectory. Experiment 2 eliminated constraints on racket and ball trajectory. Experiment 3 excluded visual or haptic information. Movements were performed with negative racket accelerations in the range of highest stability. Performance with eyes closed was more variable, leaving acceleration unaffected. With haptic information, performance was more stable than with visual information alone.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Biomimetic oculomotor control

Shibata, T., Vijayakumar, S., Conradt, J., Schaal, S.

Adaptive Behavior, 9(3/4):189-207, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Oculomotor control in a humanoid robot faces similar problems as biological oculomotor systems, i.e., capturing targets accurately on a very narrow fovea, dealing with large delays in the control system, the stabilization of gaze in face of unknown perturbations of the body, selective attention, and the complexity of stereo vision. In this paper, we suggest control circuits to realize three of the most basic oculomotor behaviors and their integration - the vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflex (VOR-OKR) for gaze stabilization, smooth pursuit for tracking moving objects, and saccades for overt visual attention. Each of these behaviors and the mechanism for their integration was derived with inspiration from computational theories as well as behavioral and physiological data in neuroscience. Our implementations on a humanoid robot demonstrate good performance of the oculomotor behaviors, which proves to be a viable strategy to explore novel control mechanisms for humanoid robotics. Conversely, insights gained from our models have been able to directly influence views and provide new directions for computational neuroscience research.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

1997


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Locally weighted learning

Atkeson, C. G., Moore, A. W., Schaal, S.

Artificial Intelligence Review, 11(1-5):11-73, 1997, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper surveys locally weighted learning, a form of lazy learning and memory-based learning, and focuses on locally weighted linear regression. The survey discusses distance functions, smoothing parameters, weighting functions, local model structures, regularization of the estimates and bias, assessing predictions, handling noisy data and outliers, improving the quality of predictions by tuning fit parameters, interference between old and new data, implementing locally weighted learning efficiently, and applications of locally weighted learning. A companion paper surveys how locally weighted learning can be used in robot learning and control. Keywords: locally weighted regression, LOESS, LWR, lazy learning, memory-based learning, least commitment learning, distance functions, smoothing parameters, weighting functions, global tuning, local tuning, interference.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

1997


link (url) [BibTex]


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Locally weighted learning for control

Atkeson, C. G., Moore, A. W., Schaal, S.

Artificial Intelligence Review, 11(1-5):75-113, 1997, clmc (article)

Abstract
Lazy learning methods provide useful representations and training algorithms for learning about complex phenomena during autonomous adaptive control of complex systems. This paper surveys ways in which locally weighted learning, a type of lazy learning, has been applied by us to control tasks. We explain various forms that control tasks can take, and how this affects the choice of learning paradigm. The discussion section explores the interesting impact that explicitly remembering all previous experiences has on the problem of learning to control. Keywords: locally weighted regression, LOESS, LWR, lazy learning, memory-based learning, least commitment learning, forward models, inverse models, linear quadratic regulation (LQR), shifting setpoint algorithm, dynamic programming.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

1995


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Memory-based neural networks for robot learning

Atkeson, C. G., Schaal, S.

Neurocomputing, 9, pages: 1-27, 1995, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper explores a memory-based approach to robot learning, using memory-based neural networks to learn models of the task to be performed. Steinbuch and Taylor presented neural network designs to explicitly store training data and do nearest neighbor lookup in the early 1960s. In this paper their nearest neighbor network is augmented with a local model network, which fits a local model to a set of nearest neighbors. This network design is equivalent to a statistical approach known as locally weighted regression, in which a local model is formed to answer each query, using a weighted regression in which nearby points (similar experiences) are weighted more than distant points (less relevant experiences). We illustrate this approach by describing how it has been used to enable a robot to learn a difficult juggling task. Keywords: memory-based, robot learning, locally weighted regression, nearest neighbor, local models.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

1995


link (url) [BibTex]