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2005


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A novel representation of protein sequences for prediction of subcellular location using support vector machines

Matsuda, S., Vert, J., Saigo, H., Ueda, N., Toh, H., Akutsu, T.

Protein Science, 14, pages: 2804-2813, 2005 (article)

Abstract
As the number of complete genomes rapidly increases, accurate methods to automatically predict the subcellular location of proteins are increasingly useful to help their functional annotation. In order to improve the predictive accuracy of the many prediction methods developed to date, a novel representation of protein sequences is proposed. This representation involves local compositions of amino acids and twin amino acids, and local frequencies of distance between successive (basic, hydrophobic, and other) amino acids. For calculating the local features, each sequence is split into three parts: N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal. The N-terminal part is further divided into four regions to consider ambiguity in the length and position of signal sequences. We tested this representation with support vector machines on two data sets extracted from the SWISS-PROT database. Through fivefold cross-validation tests, overall accuracies of more than 87% and 91% were obtained for eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins, respectively. It is concluded that considering the respective features in the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal parts is helpful to predict the subcellular location. Keywords: subcellular location; signal sequence; amino acid composition; distance frequency; support vector machine; predictive accuracy

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Web DOI [BibTex]

2005


Web DOI [BibTex]


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A tutorial on v-support vector machines

Chen, P., Lin, C., Schölkopf, B.

Applied Stochastic Models in Business and Industry, 21(2):111-136, 2005 (article)

Abstract
We briefly describe the main ideas of statistical learning theory, support vector machines (SVMs), and kernel feature spaces. We place particular emphasis on a description of the so-called -SVM, including details of the algorithm and its implementation, theoretical results, and practical applications. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Robust EEG Channel Selection Across Subjects for Brain Computer Interfaces

Schröder, M., Lal, T., Hinterberger, T., Bogdan, M., Hill, J., Birbaumer, N., Rosenstiel, W., Schölkopf, B.

EURASIP Journal on Applied Signal Processing, 2005(19, Special Issue: Trends in Brain Computer Interfaces):3103-3112, (Editors: Vesin, J. M., T. Ebrahimi), 2005 (article)

Abstract
Most EEG-based Brain Computer Interface (BCI) paradigms come along with specific electrode positions, e.g.~for a visual based BCI electrode positions close to the primary visual cortex are used. For new BCI paradigms it is usually not known where task relevant activity can be measured from the scalp. For individual subjects Lal et.~al showed that recording positions can be found without the use of prior knowledge about the paradigm used. However it remains unclear to what extend their method of Recursive Channel Elimination (RCE) can be generalized across subjects. In this paper we transfer channel rankings from a group of subjects to a new subject. For motor imagery tasks the results are promising, although cross-subject channel selection does not quite achieve the performance of channel selection on data of single subjects. Although the RCE method was not provided with prior knowledge about the mental task, channels that are well known to be important (from a physiological point of view) were consistently selected whereas task-irrelevant channels were reliably disregarded.

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Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]