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2013


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Accurate indel prediction using paired-end short reads

Grimm, D., Hagmann, J., Koenig, D., Weigel, D., Borgwardt, KM.

BMC Genomics, 14(132), 2013 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2013


Web DOI [BibTex]


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Counterfactual Reasoning and Learning Systems: The Example of Computational Advertising

Bottou, L., Peters, J., Quiñonero-Candela, J., Charles, D., Chickering, D., Portugualy, E., Ray, D., Simard, P., Snelson, E.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 14, pages: 3207-3260, 2013 (article)

ei

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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When luminance increment thresholds depend on apparent lightness

Maertens, M., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 13(6):1-11, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Efficient network-guided multi-locus association mapping with graph cuts

Azencott, C., Grimm, D., Sugiyama, M., Kawahara, Y., Borgwardt, K.

Bioinformatics, 29(13):i171-i179, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Semi-supervised learning in causal and anticausal settings

Schölkopf, B., Janzing, D., Peters, J., Sgouritsa, E., Zhang, K., Mooij, J.

In Empirical Inference, pages: 129-141, 13, Festschrift in Honor of Vladimir Vapnik, (Editors: Schölkopf, B., Luo, Z. and Vovk, V.), Springer, 2013 (inbook)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Quantifying causal influences

Janzing, D., Balduzzi, D., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Schölkopf, B.

Annals of Statistics, 41(5):2324-2358, 2013 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Probabilistic movement modeling for intention inference in human-robot interaction

Wang, Z., Mülling, K., Deisenroth, M., Ben Amor, H., Vogt, D., Schölkopf, B., Peters, J.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 32(7):841-858, 2013 (article)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Blind Retrospective Motion Correction of MR Images

Loktyushin, A., Nickisch, H., Pohmann, R., Schölkopf, B.

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), 70(6):1608–1618, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Modeling fixation locations using spatial point processes

Barthelmé, S., Trukenbrod, H., Engbert, R., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 13(12):1-34, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Whenever eye movements are measured, a central part of the analysis has to do with where subjects fixate and why they fixated where they fixated. To a first approximation, a set of fixations can be viewed as a set of points in space; this implies that fixations are spatial data and that the analysis of fixation locations can be beneficially thought of as a spatial statistics problem. We argue that thinking of fixation locations as arising from point processes is a very fruitful framework for eye-movement data, helping turn qualitative questions into quantitative ones. We provide a tutorial introduction to some of the main ideas of the field of spatial statistics, focusing especially on spatial Poisson processes. We show how point processes help relate image properties to fixation locations. In particular we show how point processes naturally express the idea that image features' predictability for fixations may vary from one image to another. We review other methods of analysis used in the literature, show how they relate to point process theory, and argue that thinking in terms of point processes substantially extends the range of analyses that can be performed and clarify their interpretation.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Tractable large-scale optimization in machine learning

Sra, S.

In Tractability: Practical Approaches to Hard Problems, pages: 202-230, 7, (Editors: Bordeaux, L., Hamadi , Y., Kohli, P. and Mateescu, R. ), Cambridge University Press , 2013 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A probabilistic model for secondary structure prediction from protein chemical shifts

Mechelke, M., Habeck, M.

Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics, 81(6):984–993, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Climate Extremes and the Carbon Cycle

Reichstein, M., Bahn, M., Ciais, P., Frank, D., Mahecha, M., Seneviratne, S., Zscheischler, J., Beer, C., Buchmann, N., Frank, D., Papale, D., Rammig, A., Smith, P., Thonicke, K., van der Velde, M., Vicca, S., Walz, A., Wattenbach, M.

Nature, 500, pages: 287-295, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Identification of stimulus cues in narrow-band tone-in-noise detection using sparse observer models

Schönfelder, V., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 134(1):447-463, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Model-based Imitation Learning

Englert, P., Paraschos, A., Peters, J., Deisenroth, M.

Adaptive Behavior Journal, 21(5):388-403, 2013 (article)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Metabolic cost as an organizing principle for cooperative learning

Balduzzi, D., Ortega, P., Besserve, M.

Advances in Complex Systems, 16(02n03):1350012, 2013 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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MR-based PET Attenuation Correction for PET/MR Imaging

Bezrukov, I., Mantlik, F., Schmidt, H., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Seminars in Nuclear Medicine, 43(1):45-59, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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MR-based Attenuation Correction Methods for Improved PET Quantification in Lesions within Bone and Susceptibility Artifact Regions

Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Mantlik, F., Schwenzer, N., Brendle, C., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 54(10):1768-1774, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Hybrid PET/MR systems have recently entered clinical practice. Thus, the accuracy of MR-based attenuation correction in simultaneously acquired data can now be investigated. We assessed the accuracy of 4 methods of MR-based attenuation correction in lesions within soft tissue, bone, and MR susceptibility artifacts: 2 segmentation-based methods (SEG1, provided by the manufacturer, and SEG2, a method with atlas-based susceptibility artifact correction); an atlas- and pattern recognition–based method (AT&PR), which also used artifact correction; and a new method combining AT&PR and SEG2 (SEG2wBONE). Methods: Attenuation maps were calculated for the PET/MR datasets of 10 patients acquired on a whole-body PET/MR system, allowing for simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR data. Eighty percent iso-contour volumes of interest were placed on lesions in soft tissue (n = 21), in bone (n = 20), near bone (n = 19), and within or near MR susceptibility artifacts (n = 9). Relative mean volume-of-interest differences were calculated with CT-based attenuation correction as a reference. Results: For soft-tissue lesions, none of the methods revealed a significant difference in PET standardized uptake value relative to CT-based attenuation correction (SEG1, −2.6% ± 5.8%; SEG2, −1.6% ± 4.9%; AT&PR, −4.7% ± 6.5%; SEG2wBONE, 0.2% ± 5.3%). For bone lesions, underestimation of PET standardized uptake values was found for all methods, with minimized error for the atlas-based approaches (SEG1, −16.1% ± 9.7%; SEG2, −11.0% ± 6.7%; AT&PR, −6.6% ± 5.0%; SEG2wBONE, −4.7% ± 4.4%). For lesions near bone, underestimations of lower magnitude were observed (SEG1, −12.0% ± 7.4%; SEG2, −9.2% ± 6.5%; AT&PR, −4.6% ± 7.8%; SEG2wBONE, −4.2% ± 6.2%). For lesions affected by MR susceptibility artifacts, quantification errors could be reduced using the atlas-based artifact correction (SEG1, −54.0% ± 38.4%; SEG2, −15.0% ± 12.2%; AT&PR, −4.1% ± 11.2%; SEG2wBONE, 0.6% ± 11.1%). Conclusion: For soft-tissue lesions, none of the evaluated methods showed statistically significant errors. For bone lesions, significant underestimations of −16% and −11% occurred for methods in which bone tissue was ignored (SEG1 and SEG2). In the present attenuation correction schemes, uncorrected MR susceptibility artifacts typically result in reduced attenuation values, potentially leading to highly reduced PET standardized uptake values, rendering lesions indistinguishable from background. While AT&PR and SEG2wBONE show accurate results in both soft tissue and bone, SEG2wBONE uses a two-step approach for tissue classification, which increases the robustness of prediction and can be applied retrospectively if more precision in bone areas is needed.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Learning output kernels for multi-task problems

Dinuzzo, F.

Neurocomputing, 118, pages: 119-126, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Analytical probabilistic modeling for radiation therapy treatment planning

Bangert, M., Hennig, P., Oelfke, U.

Physics in Medicine and Biology, 58(16):5401-5419, 2013 (article)

ei pn

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Imaging Findings and Therapy Response Monitoring in Chronic Sclerodermatous Graft-Versus-Host Disease: Preliminary Data of a Simultaneous PET/MRI Approach

Sauter, A., Schmidt, H., Mantlik, F., Kolb, A., Federmann, B., Pfannenberg, C., Reimold, M., Pichler, B., Bethge, W., Horger, M.

Clinical Nuclear Medicine, 38(8):e309-e317, 2013 (article)

Abstract
PURPOSE: Our objective was a multifunctional imaging approach of chronic sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (ScGVHD) and its course during therapy using PET/MRI. METHODS: We performed partial-body PET/CT and PET/MRI of the calf in 6 consecutively recruited patients presenting with severe ScGVHD. The patients were treated with different immunosuppressive regimens and supportive therapies. PET/CT scanning started 60.5 +/- 3.3 minutes, PET/MRI imaging 139.5 +/- 16.7 minutes after F-FDG application. MRI acquisition included T1- (precontrast and postcontrast) and T2-weighted sequences. SUVmean, T1 contrast enhancement, and T2 signal intensity from region-of-interest analysis were calculated for different fascial and muscular compartments. In addition, musculoskeletal MRI findings and the modified Rodnan skin score were assessed. All patients underwent imaging follow-up. RESULTS: At baseline PET/MRI, ScGVHD-related musculoskeletal abnormalities consisted of increased signal and/or thickening of involved anatomical structures on T2-weighted and T1 postcontrast images as well as an increased FDG uptake. At follow-up, ScGVHD-related imaging findings decreased (SUVmean n = 4, mean T1 contrast enhancement n = 5, mean T2 signal intensity n = 3) or progressed (SUVmean n = 3, mean T1 contrast enhancement n = 2, mean T2 signal intensity n = 4). Clinically modified Rodnan skin score improved for 5 follow-ups and progressed for 2. SUVmean values correlated between PET/CT and PET/MRI acquisition (r = 0.660, P = 0.014), T1 contrast enhancement, and T2 signal (r = 0.668, P = 0.012), but not between the SUVmean values and the MRI parameters. CONCLUSIONS: PET/MRI as a combined morphological and functional technique seems to assess the inflammatory processes from different points of view and provides therefore in part complementary information

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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A Survey on Policy Search for Robotics, Foundations and Trends in Robotics

Deisenroth, M., Neumann, G., Peters, J.

Foundations and Trends in Robotics, 2(1-2):1-142, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning in Robotics: A Review

Kober, J., Bagnell, D., Peters, J.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 32(11):1238–1274, 2013 (article)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Multimodal information improves the rapid detection of mental fatigue

Laurent, F., Valderrama, M., Besserve, M., Guillard, M., Lachaux, J., Martinerie, J., Florence, G.

Biomedical Signal Processing and Control, 8(4):400 - 408, 2013 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Interactive Domain Adaptation for the Classification of Remote Sensing Images using Active Learning

Persello, C.

IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, 10(4):736-740, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Learning to Select and Generalize Striking Movements in Robot Table Tennis

Mülling, K., Kober, J., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 32(3):263-279, 2013 (article)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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HiFiVE: A Hilbert Space Embedding of Fiber Variability Estimates for Uncertainty Modeling and Visualization

Schultz, T., Schlaffke, L., Schölkopf, B., Schmidt-Wilcke, T.

Computer Graphics Forum, 32(3):121-130, (Editors: B Preim, P Rheingans, and H Theisel), Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK, Eurographics Conference on Visualization (EuroVis), 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Detection and attribution of large spatiotemporal extreme events in Earth observation data

Zscheischler, J., Mahecha, M., Harmeling, S., Reichstein, M.

Ecological Informatics, 15, pages: 66-73, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Latest climate projections suggest that both frequency and intensity of climate extremes will be substantially modified over the course of the coming decades. As a consequence, we need to understand to what extent and via which pathways climate extremes affect the state and functionality of terrestrial ecosystems and the associated biogeochemical cycles on a global scale. So far the impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial biosphere were mainly investigated on the basis of case studies, while global assessments are widely lacking. In order to facilitate global analysis of this kind, we present a methodological framework that firstly detects spatiotemporally contiguous extremes in Earth observations, and secondly infers the likely pathway of the preceding climate anomaly. The approach does not require long time series, is computationally fast, and easily applicable to a variety of data sets with different spatial and temporal resolutions. The key element of our analysis strategy is to directly search in the relevant observations for spatiotemporally connected components exceeding a certain percentile threshold. We also put an emphasis on characterization of extreme event distribution, and scrutinize the attribution issue. We exemplify the analysis strategy by exploring the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) from 1982 to 2011. Our results suggest that the hot spots of extremes in fAPAR lie in Northeastern Brazil, Southeastern Australia, Kenya and Tanzania. Moreover, we demonstrate that the size distribution of extremes follow a distinct power law. The attribution framework reveals that extremes in fAPAR are primarily driven by phases of water scarcity.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Simultaneous PET/MR reveals Brain Function in Activated and Resting State on Metabolic, Hemodynamic and Multiple Temporal Scales

Wehrl, H., Hossain, M., Lankes, K., Liu, C., Bezrukov, I., Martirosian, P., Schick, F., Reischl, G., Pichler, B.

Nature Medicine, 19, pages: 1184–1189, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new tool to study functional processes in the brain. Here we study brain function in response to a barrel-field stimulus simultaneously using PET, which traces changes in glucose metabolism on a slow time scale, and functional MRI (fMRI), which assesses fast vascular and oxygenation changes during activation. We found spatial and quantitative discrepancies between the PET and the fMRI activation data. The functional connectivity of the rat brain was assessed by both modalities: the fMRI approach determined a total of nine known neural networks, whereas the PET method identified seven glucose metabolism–related networks. These results demonstrate the feasibility of combined PET-MRI for the simultaneous study of the brain at activation and rest, revealing comprehensive and complementary information to further decode brain function and brain networks.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Finding Potential Support Vectors in Separable Classification Problems

Varagnolo, D., Del Favero, S., Dinuzzo, F., Schenato, L., Pillonetto, G.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems, 24(11):1799-1813, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Open-Box Spectral Clustering: Applications to Medical Image Analysis

Schultz, T., Kindlmann, G.

IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 19(12):2100-2108, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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im3shape: a maximum likelihood galaxy shear measurement code for cosmic gravitational lensing

Zuntz, J., Kacprzak, T., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M., Rowe, B., Bridle, S.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 434(2):1604-1618, Oxford University Press, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Accurate detection of differential RNA processing

Drewe, P., Stegle, O., Hartmann, L., Kahles, A., Bohnert, R., Wachter, A., Borgwardt, K. M., Rätsch, G.

Nucleic Acids Research, 41(10):5189-5198, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Detecting regulatory gene–environment interactions with unmeasured environmental factors

Fusi, N., Lippert, C., Borgwardt, K. M., Lawrence, N. D., Stegle, O.

Bioinformatics, 29(11):1382-1389, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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On the Relations and Differences between Popper Dimension, Exclusion Dimension and VC-Dimension

Seldin, Y., Schölkopf, B.

In Empirical Inference - Festschrift in Honor of Vladimir N. Vapnik, pages: 53-57, 6, (Editors: Schölkopf, B., Luo, Z. and Vovk, V.), Springer, 2013 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Fragmentation of Slow Wave Sleep after Onset of Complete Locked-In State

Soekadar, S. R., Born, J., Birbaumer, N., Bensch, M., Halder, S., Murguialday, A. R., Gharabaghi, A., Nijboer, F., Schölkopf, B., Martens, S.

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 9(9):951-953, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structural learning

Braun, D

Scholarpedia, 8(10):12312, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
Structural learning in motor control refers to a metalearning process whereby an agent extracts (abstract) invariants from its sensorimotor stream when experiencing a range of environments that share similar structure. Such invariants can then be exploited for faster generalization and learning-to-learn when experiencing novel, but related task environments.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions

Grau-Moya, J, Hez, E, Pezzulo, G, Braun, DA

Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 10(87):1-11, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
Decision-makers have been shown to rely on probabilistic models for perception and action. However, these models can be incorrect or partially wrong in which case the decision-maker has to cope with model uncertainty. Model uncertainty has recently also been shown to be an important determinant of sensorimotor behaviour in humans that can lead to risk-sensitive deviations from Bayes optimal behaviour towards worst-case or best-case outcomes. Here, we investigate the effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions similar to the stag-hunt game, where players develop models about the other player and decide between a pay-off-dominant cooperative solution and a risk-dominant, non-cooperative solution. In simulations, we show that players who allow for optimistic deviations from their opponent model are much more likely to converge to cooperative outcomes. We also implemented this agent model in a virtual reality environment, and let human subjects play against a virtual player. In this game, subjects' pay-offs were experienced as forces opposing their movements. During the experiment, we manipulated the risk sensitivity of the computer player and observed human responses. We found not only that humans adaptively changed their level of cooperation depending on the risk sensitivity of the computer player but also that their initial play exhibited characteristic risk-sensitive biases. Our results suggest that model uncertainty is an important determinant of cooperation in two-player sensorimotor interactions.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Thermodynamics as a theory of decision-making with information-processing costs

Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A, 469(2153):1-18, May 2013 (article)

Abstract
Perfectly rational decision-makers maximize expected utility, but crucially ignore the resource costs incurred when determining optimal actions. Here, we propose a thermodynamically inspired formalization of bounded rational decision-making where information processing is modelled as state changes in thermodynamic systems that can be quantified by differences in free energy. By optimizing a free energy, bounded rational decision-makers trade off expected utility gains and information-processing costs measured by the relative entropy. As a result, the bounded rational decision-making problem can be rephrased in terms of well-known variational principles from statistical physics. In the limit when computational costs are ignored, the maximum expected utility principle is recovered. We discuss links to existing decision-making frameworks and applications to human decision-making experiments that are at odds with expected utility theory. Since most of the mathematical machinery can be borrowed from statistical physics, the main contribution is to re-interpret the formalism of thermodynamic free-energy differences in terms of bounded rational decision-making and to discuss its relationship to human decision-making experiments.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2007


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A Tutorial on Spectral Clustering

von Luxburg, U.

Statistics and Computing, 17(4):395-416, December 2007 (article)

Abstract
In recent years, spectral clustering has become one of the most popular modern clustering algorithms. It is simple to implement, can be solved efficiently by standard linear algebra software, and very often outperforms traditional clustering algorithms such as the k-means algorithm. On the first glance spectral clustering appears slightly mysterious, and it is not obvious to see why it works at all and what it really does. The goal of this tutorial is to give some intuition on those questions. We describe different graph Laplacians and their basic properties, present the most common spectral clustering algorithms, and derive those algorithms from scratch by several different approaches. Advantages and disadvantages of the different spectral clustering algorithms are discussed.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

2007


PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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A Tutorial on Kernel Methods for Categorization

Jäkel, F., Schölkopf, B., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 51(6):343-358, December 2007 (article)

Abstract
The abilities to learn and to categorize are fundamental for cognitive systems, be it animals or machines, and therefore have attracted attention from engineers and psychologists alike. Modern machine learning methods and psychological models of categorization are remarkably similar, partly because these two fields share a common history in artificial neural networks and reinforcement learning. However, machine learning is now an independent and mature field that has moved beyond psychologically or neurally inspired algorithms towards providing foundations for a theory of learning that is rooted in statistics and functional analysis. Much of this research is potentially interesting for psychological theories of learning and categorization but also hardly accessible for psychologists. Here, we provide a tutorial introduction to a popular class of machine learning tools, called kernel methods. These methods are closely related to perceptrons, radial-basis-function neural networks and exemplar theories of catego rization. Recent theoretical advances in machine learning are closely tied to the idea that the similarity of patterns can be encapsulated in a positive definite kernel. Such a positive definite kernel can define a reproducing kernel Hilbert space which allows one to use powerful tools from functional analysis for the analysis of learning algorithms. We give basic explanations of some key concepts—the so-called kernel trick, the representer theorem and regularization—which may open up the possibility that insights from machine learning can feed back into psychology.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Accurate Splice site Prediction Using Support Vector Machines

Sonnenburg, S., Schweikert, G., Philips, P., Behr, J., Rätsch, G.

BMC Bioinformatics, 8(Supplement 10):1-16, December 2007 (article)

Abstract
Background: For splice site recognition, one has to solve two classification problems: discriminating true from decoy splice sites for both acceptor and donor sites. Gene finding systems typically rely on Markov Chains to solve these tasks. Results: In this work we consider Support Vector Machines for splice site recognition. We employ the so-called weighted degree kernel which turns out well suited for this task, as we will illustrate in several experiments where we compare its prediction accuracy with that of recently proposed systems. We apply our method to the genome-wide recognition of splice sites in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana, Danio rerio, and Homo sapiens. Our performance estimates indicate that splice sites can be recognized very accurately in these genomes and that our method outperforms many other methods including Markov Chains, GeneSplicer and SpliceMachine. We provide genome-wide predictions of splice sites and a stand-alone prediction tool ready to be used for incorporation in a gene finder. Availability: Data, splits, additional information on the model selection, the whole genome predictions, as well as the stand-alone prediction tool are available for download at http:// www.fml.mpg.de/raetsch/projects/splice.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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A unifying framework for robot control with redundant DOFs

Peters, J., Mistry, M., Udwadia, F., Nakanishi, J., Schaal, S.

Autonomous Robots, 24(1):1-12, October 2007 (article)

Abstract
Recently, Udwadia (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 2003:1783–1800, 2003) suggested to derive tracking controllers for mechanical systems with redundant degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) using a generalization of Gauss’ principle of least constraint. This method allows reformulating control problems as a special class of optimal controllers. In this paper, we take this line of reasoning one step further and demonstrate that several well-known and also novel nonlinear robot control laws can be derived from this generic methodology. We show experimental verifications on a Sarcos Master Arm robot for some of the derived controllers. The suggested approach offers a promising unification and simplification of nonlinear control law design for robots obeying rigid body dynamics equations, both with or without external constraints, with over-actuation or underactuation, as well as open-chain and closed-chain kinematics.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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The Need for Open Source Software in Machine Learning

Sonnenburg, S., Braun, M., Ong, C., Bengio, S., Bottou, L., Holmes, G., LeCun, Y., Müller, K., Pereira, F., Rasmussen, C., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Vincent, P., Weston, J., Williamson, R.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 8, pages: 2443-2466, October 2007 (article)

Abstract
Open source tools have recently reached a level of maturity which makes them suitable for building large-scale real-world systems. At the same time, the field of machine learning has developed a large body of powerful learning algorithms for diverse applications. However, the true potential of these methods is not realized, since existing implementations are not openly shared, resulting in software with low usability, and weak interoperability. We argue that this situation can be significantly improved by increasing incentives for researchers to publish their software under an open source model. Additionally, we outline the problems authors are faced with when trying to publish algorithmic implementations of machine learning methods. We believe that a resource of peer reviewed software accompanied by short articles would be highly valuable to both the machine learning and the general scientific community.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Some observations on the masking effects of Mach bands

Curnow, T., Cowie, DA., Henning, GB., Hill, NJ.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 24(10):3233-3241, October 2007 (article)

Abstract
There are 8 cycle / deg ripples or oscillations in performance as a function of location near Mach bands in experiments measuring Mach bands’ masking effects on random polarity signal bars. The oscillations with increments are 180 degrees out of phase with those for decrements. The oscillations, much larger than the measurement error, appear to relate to the weighting function of the spatial-frequency-tuned channel detecting the broad- band signals. The ripples disappear with step maskers and become much smaller at durations below 25 ms, implying either that the site of masking has changed or that the weighting function and hence spatial-frequency tuning is slow to develop.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machine Learning for Interdependent and Structured Output Spaces

Altun, Y., Hofmann, T., Tsochantaridis, I.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 85-104, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: Bakir, G. H. , T. Hofmann, B. Schölkopf, A. J. Smola, B. Taskar, S. V. N. Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Brisk Kernel ICA

Jegelka, S., Gretton, A.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 225-250, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
Recent approaches to independent component analysis have used kernel independence measures to obtain very good performance in ICA, particularly in areas where classical methods experience difficulty (for instance, sources with near-zero kurtosis). In this chapter, we compare two efficient extensions of these methods for large-scale problems: random subsampling of entries in the Gram matrices used in defining the independence measures, and incomplete Cholesky decomposition of these matrices. We derive closed-form, efficiently computable approximations for the gradients of these measures, and compare their performance on ICA using both artificial and music data. We show that kernel ICA can scale up to much larger problems than yet attempted, and that incomplete Cholesky decomposition performs better than random sampling.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Mining complex genotypic features for predicting HIV-1 drug resistance

Saigo, H., Uno, T., Tsuda, K.

Bioinformatics, 23(18):2455-2462, September 2007 (article)

Abstract
Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolves in human body, and its exposure to a drug often causes mutations that enhance the resistance against the drug. To design an effective pharmacotherapy for an individual patient, it is important to accurately predict the drug resistance based on genotype data. Notably, the resistance is not just the simple sum of the effects of all mutations. Structural biological studies suggest that the association of mutations is crucial: Even if mutations A or B alone do not affect the resistance, a significant change might happen when the two mutations occur together. Linear regression methods cannot take the associations into account, while decision tree methods can reveal only limited associations. Kernel methods and neural networks implicitly use all possible associations for prediction, but cannot select salient associations explicitly. Our method, itemset boosting, performs linear regression in the complete space of power sets of mutations. It implements a forward feature selection procedure where, in each iteration, one mutation combination is found by an efficient branch-and-bound search. This method uses all possible combinations, and salient associations are explicitly shown. In experiments, our method worked particularly well for predicting the resistance of nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Furthermore, it successfully recovered many mutation associations known in biological literature.

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Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Training a Support Vector Machine in the Primal

Chapelle, O.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 29-50, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007, This is a slightly updated version of the Neural Computation paper (inbook)

Abstract
Most literature on Support Vector Machines (SVMs) concentrate on the dual optimization problem. In this paper, we would like to point out that the primal problem can also be solved efficiently, both for linear and non-linear SVMs, and that there is no reason to ignore this possibility. On the contrary, from the primal point of view new families of algorithms for large scale SVM training can be investigated.

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PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Approximation Methods for Gaussian Process Regression

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Rasmussen, CE., Williams, CKI.

In Large-Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 203-223, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
A wealth of computationally efficient approximation methods for Gaussian process regression have been recently proposed. We give a unifying overview of sparse approximations, following Quiñonero-Candela and Rasmussen (2005), and a brief review of approximate matrix-vector multiplication methods.

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PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]