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2009


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Enumeration of condition-dependent dense modules in protein interaction networks

Georgii, E., Dietmann, S., Uno, T., Pagel, P., Tsuda, K.

Bioinformatics, 25(7):933-940, February 2009 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Modern systems biology aims at understanding how the different molecular components of a biological cell interact. Often, cellular functions are performed by complexes consisting of many different proteins. The composition of these complexes may change according to the cellular environment, and one protein may be involved in several different processes. The automatic discovery of functional complexes from protein interaction data is challenging. While previous approaches use approximations to extract dense modules, our approach exactly solves the problem of dense module enumeration. Furthermore, constraints from additional information sources such as gene expression and phenotype data can be integrated, so we can systematically mine for dense modules with interesting profiles. Results: Given a weighted protein interaction network, our method discovers all protein sets that satisfy a user-defined minimum density threshold. We employ a reverse search strategy, which allows us to exploit the density criterion in an efficient way. Our experiments show that the novel approach is feasible and produces biologically meaningful results. In comparative validation studies using yeast data, the method achieved the best overall prediction performance with respect to confirmed complexes. Moreover, by enhancing the yeast network with phenotypic and phylogenetic profiles and the human network with tissue-specific expression data, we identified condition-dependent complex variants.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2009


Web DOI [BibTex]


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Classification of colon polyps in NBI endoscopy using vascularization features

Stehle, T., Auer, R., Gross, S., Behrens, A., Wulff, J., Aach, T., Winograd, R., Trautwein, C., Tischendorf, J.

In Medical Imaging 2009: Computer-Aided Diagnosis, 7260, (Editors: N. Karssemeijer and M. L. Giger), SPIE, February 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The evolution of colon cancer starts with colon polyps. There are two different types of colon polyps, namely hyperplasias and adenomas. Hyperplasias are benign polyps which are known not to evolve into cancer and, therefore, do not need to be removed. By contrast, adenomas have a strong tendency to become malignant. Therefore, they have to be removed immediately via polypectomy. For this reason, a method to differentiate reliably adenomas from hyperplasias during a preventive medical endoscopy of the colon (colonoscopy) is highly desirable. A recent study has shown that it is possible to distinguish both types of polyps visually by means of their vascularization. Adenomas exhibit a large amount of blood vessel capillaries on their surface whereas hyperplasias show only few of them. In this paper, we show the feasibility of computer-based classification of colon polyps using vascularization features. The proposed classification algorithm consists of several steps: For the critical part of vessel segmentation, we implemented and compared two segmentation algorithms. After a skeletonization of the detected blood vessel candidates, we used the results as seed points for the Fast Marching algorithm which is used to segment the whole vessel lumen. Subsequently, features are computed from this segmentation which are then used to classify the polyps. In leave-one-out tests on our polyp database (56 polyps), we achieve a correct classification rate of approximately 90%.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Prototype Classification: Insights from Machine Learning

Graf, A., Bousquet, O., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Computation, 21(1):272-300, January 2009 (article)

Abstract
We shed light on the discrimination between patterns belonging to two different classes by casting this decoding problem into a generalized prototype framework. The discrimination process is then separated into two stages: a projection stage that reduces the dimensionality of the data by projecting it on a line and a threshold stage where the distributions of the projected patterns of both classes are separated. For this, we extend the popular mean-of-class prototype classification using algorithms from machine learning that satisfy a set of invariance properties. We report a simple yet general approach to express different types of linear classification algorithms in an identical and easy-to-visualize formal framework using generalized prototypes where these prototypes are used to express the normal vector and offset of the hyperplane. We investigate nonmargin classifiers such as the classical prototype classifier, the Fisher classifier, and the relevance vector machine. We then study hard and soft margin cl assifiers such as the support vector machine and a boosted version of the prototype classifier. Subsequently, we relate mean-of-class prototype classification to other classification algorithms by showing that the prototype classifier is a limit of any soft margin classifier and that boosting a prototype classifier yields the support vector machine. While giving novel insights into classification per se by presenting a common and unified formalism, our generalized prototype framework also provides an efficient visualization and a principled comparison of machine learning classification.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Automatic classification of brain resting states using fMRI temporal signals

Soldati, N., Robinson, S., Persello, C., Jovicich, J., Bruzzone, L.

Electronics Letters, 45(1):19-21, January 2009 (article)

Abstract
A novel technique is presented for the automatic discrimination between networks of dasiaresting statesdasia of the human brain and physiological fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The method is based on features identified via a statistical approach to group independent component analysis time courses, which may be extracted from fMRI data. This technique is entirely automatic and, unlike other approaches, uses temporal rather than spatial information. The method achieves 83% accuracy in the identification of resting state networks.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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The DICS repository: module-assisted analysis of disease-related gene lists

Dietmann, S., Georgii, E., Antonov, A., Tsuda, K., Mewes, H.

Bioinformatics, 25(6):830-831, January 2009 (article)

Abstract
The DICS database is a dynamic web repository of computationally predicted functional modules from the human protein–protein interaction network. It provides references to the CORUM, DrugBank, KEGG and Reactome pathway databases. DICS can be accessed for retrieving sets of overlapping modules and protein complexes that are significantly enriched in a gene list, thereby providing valuable information about the functional context.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Large Margin Methods for Part of Speech Tagging

Altun, Y.

In Automatic Speech and Speaker Recognition: Large Margin and Kernel Methods, pages: 141-160, (Editors: Keshet, J. and Bengio, S.), Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, USA, January 2009 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Pre−processed feature ranking for a support vector machine

Weston, J., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Pérez-Cruz, F., Guyon, I.

United States Patent, No. 7475048, January 2009 (patent)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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mGene: accurate SVM-based gene finding with an application to nematode genomes

Schweikert, G., Zien, A., Zeller, G., Behr, J., Dieterich, C., Ong, C., Philips, P., De Bona, F., Hartmann, L., Bohlen, A., Krüger, N., Sonnenburg, S., Rätsch, G.

Genome Research, 19(11):2133-43, 2009 (article)

Abstract
We present a highly accurate gene-prediction system for eukaryotic genomes, called mGene. It combines in an unprecedented manner the flexibility of generalized hidden Markov models (gHMMs) with the predictive power of modern machine learning methods, such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs). Its excellent performance was proved in an objective competition based on the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Considering the average of sensitivity and specificity, the developmental version of mGene exhibited the best prediction performance on nucleotide, exon, and transcript level for ab initio and multiple-genome gene-prediction tasks. The fully developed version shows superior performance in 10 out of 12 evaluation criteria compared with the other participating gene finders, including Fgenesh++ and Augustus. An in-depth analysis of mGene's genome-wide predictions revealed that approximately 2200 predicted genes were not contained in the current genome annotation. Testing a subset of 57 of these genes by RT-PCR and sequencing, we confirmed expression for 24 (42%) of them. mGene missed 300 annotated genes, out of which 205 were unconfirmed. RT-PCR testing of 24 of these genes resulted in a success rate of merely 8%. These findings suggest that even the gene catalog of a well-studied organism such as C. elegans can be substantially improved by mGene's predictions. We also provide gene predictions for the four nematodes C. briggsae, C. brenneri, C. japonica, and C. remanei. Comparing the resulting proteomes among these organisms and to the known protein universe, we identified many species-specific gene inventions. In a quality assessment of several available annotations for these genomes, we find that mGene's predictions are most accurate.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Efficient Bregman Range Search

Cayton, L.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 243-251, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We develop an algorithm for efficient range search when the notion of dissimilarity is given by a Bregman divergence. The range search task is to return all points in a potentially large database that are within some specified distance of a query. It arises in many learning algorithms such as locally-weighted regression, kernel density estimation, neighborhood graph-based algorithms, and in tasks like outlier detection and information retrieval. In metric spaces, efficient range search-like algorithms based on spatial data structures have been deployed on a variety of statistical tasks. Here we describe an algorithm for range search for an arbitrary Bregman divergence. This broad class of dissimilarity measures includes the relative entropy, Mahalanobis distance, Itakura-Saito divergence, and a variety of matrix divergences. Metric methods cannot be directly applied since Bregman divergences do not in general satisfy the triangle inequality. We derive geometric properties of Bregman divergences that yield an efficient algorithm for range search based on a recently proposed space decomposition for Bregman divergences.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Structure and activity of the N-terminal substrate recognition domains in proteasomal ATPases

Djuranovic, S., Hartmann, MD., Habeck, M., Ursinus, A., Zwickl, P., Martin, J., Lupas, AN., Zeth, K.

Molecular Cell, 34(5):580-590, 2009 (article)

Abstract
The proteasome forms the core of the protein quality control system in archaea and eukaryotes and also occurs in one bacterial lineage, the Actinobacteria. Access to its proteolytic compartment is controlled by AAA ATPases, whose N-terminal domains (N domains) are thought to mediate substrate recognition. The N domains of an archaeal proteasomal ATPase, Archaeoglobus fulgidus PAN, and of its actinobacterial homolog, Rhodococcus erythropolis ARC, form hexameric rings, whose subunits consist of an N-terminal coiled coil and a C-terminal OB domain. In ARC-N, the OB domains are duplicated and form separate rings. PAN-N and ARC-N can act as chaperones, preventing the aggregation of heterologous proteins in vitro, and this activity is preserved in various chimeras, even when these include coiled coils and OB domains from unrelated proteins. The structures suggest a molecular mechanism for substrate processing based on concerted radial motions of the coiled coils relative to the OB rings.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Discussion of: Brownian Distance Covariance

Gretton, A., Fukumizu, K., Sriperumbudur, B.

The Annals of Applied Statistics, 3(4):1285-1294, 2009 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Covariate shift and local learning by distribution matching

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Huang, J., Schmittfull, M., Borgwardt, K., Schölkopf, B.

In Dataset Shift in Machine Learning, pages: 131-160, (Editors: Quiñonero-Candela, J., Sugiyama, M., Schwaighofer, A. and Lawrence, N. D.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2009 (inbook)

Abstract
Given sets of observations of training and test data, we consider the problem of re-weighting the training data such that its distribution more closely matches that of the test data. We achieve this goal by matching covariate distributions between training and test sets in a high dimensional feature space (specifically, a reproducing kernel Hilbert space). This approach does not require distribution estimation. Instead, the sample weights are obtained by a simple quadratic programming procedure. We provide a uniform convergence bound on the distance between the reweighted training feature mean and the test feature mean, a transductive bound on the expected loss of an algorithm trained on the reweighted data, and a connection to single class SVMs. While our method is designed to deal with the case of simple covariate shift (in the sense of Chapter ??), we have also found benefits for sample selection bias on the labels. Our correction procedure yields its greatest and most consistent advantages when the learning algorithm returns a classifier/regressor that is simpler" than the data might suggest.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Choice and Classifiability for RKHS Embeddings of Probability Distributions

Sriperumbudur, B., Fukumizu, K., Gretton, A., Lanckriet, G., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 1750-1758, (Editors: Y Bengio and D Schuurmans and J Lafferty and C Williams and A Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Embeddings of probability measures into reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces have been proposed as a straightforward and practical means of representing and comparing probabilities. In particular, the distance between embeddings (the maximum mean discrepancy, or MMD) has several key advantages over many classical metrics on distributions, namely easy computability, fast convergence and low bias of finite sample estimates. An important requirement of the embedding RKHS is that it be characteristic: in this case, the MMD between two distributions is zero if and only if the distributions coincide. Three new results on the MMD are introduced in the present study. First, it is established that MMD corresponds to the optimal risk of a kernel classifier, thus forming a natural link between the distance between distributions and their ease of classification. An important consequence is that a kernel must be characteristic to guarantee classifiability between distributions in the RKHS. Second, the class of characteristic kernels is broadened to incorporate all strictly positive definite kernels: these include non-translation invariant kernels and kernels on non-compact domains. Third, a generalization of the MMD is proposed for families of kernels, as the supremum over MMDs on a class of kernels (for instance the Gaussian kernels with different bandwidths). This extension is necessary to obtain a single distance measure if a large selection or class of characteristic kernels is potentially appropriate. This generalization is reasonable, given that it corresponds to the problem of learning the kernel by minimizing the risk of the corresponding kernel classifier. The generalized MMD is shown to have consistent finite sample estimates, and its performance is demonstrated on a homogeneity testing example.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Nonlinear directed acyclic structure learning with weakly additive noise models

Tillman, R., Gretton, A., Spirtes, P.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 1847-1855, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The recently proposed emph{additive noise model} has advantages over previous structure learning algorithms, when attempting to recover some true data generating mechanism, since it (i) does not assume linearity or Gaussianity and (ii) can recover a unique DAG rather than an equivalence class. However, its original extension to the multivariate case required enumerating all possible DAGs, and for some special distributions, e.g. linear Gaussian, the model is invertible and thus cannot be used for structure learning. We present a new approach which combines a PC style search using recent advances in kernel measures of conditional dependence with local searches for additive noise models in substructures of the equivalence class. This results in a more computationally efficient approach that is useful for arbitrary distributions even when additive noise models are invertible. Experiments with synthetic and real data show that this method is more accurate than previous methods when data are nonlinear and/or non-Gaussian.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Efficient factor GARCH models and factor-DCC models

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

Quantitative Finance, 9(1):71-91, 2009 (article)

Abstract
We report that, in the estimation of univariate GARCH or multivariate generalized orthogonal GARCH (GO-GARCH) models, maximizing the likelihood is equivalent to making the standardized residuals as independent as possible. Based on this, we propose three factor GARCH models in the framework of GO-GARCH: independent-factor GARCH exploits factors that are statistically as independent as possible; factors in best-factor GARCH have the largest autocorrelation in their squared values such that their volatilities could be forecast well by univariate GARCH; and factors in conditional-decorrelation GARCH are conditionally as uncorrelated as possible. A convenient two-step method for estimating these models is introduced. Since the extracted factors may still have weak conditional correlations, we further propose factor-DCC models as an extension to the above factor GARCH models with dynamic conditional correlation (DCC) modelling the remaining conditional correlations between factors. Experimental results for the Hong Kong stock market show that conditional-decorrelation GARCH and independent-factor GARCH have better generalization performance than the original GO-GARCH, and that conditional-decorrelation GARCH (among factor GARCH models) and its extension with DCC embedded (among factor-DCC models) behave best.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Graphical models for decoding in BCI visual speller systems

Martens, S., Farquhar, J., Hill, J., Schölkopf, B.

In pages: 470-473, IEEE, 4th International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER), 2009 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Fast, Consistent Kernel Two-Sample Test

Gretton, A., Fukumizu, K., Harchaoui, Z., Sriperumbudur, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 673-681, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A kernel embedding of probability distributions into reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS) has recently been proposed, which allows the comparison of two probability measures P and Q based on the distance between their respective embeddings: for a sufficiently rich RKHS, this distance is zero if and only if P and Q coincide. In using this distance as a statistic for a test of whether two samples are from different distributions, a major difficulty arises in computing the significance threshold, since the empirical statistic has as its null distribution (where P = Q) an infinite weighted sum of x2 random variables. Prior finite sample approximations to the null distribution include using bootstrap resampling, which yields a consistent estimate but is computationally costly; and fitting a parametric model with the low order moments of the test statistic, which can work well in practice but has no consistency or accuracy guarantees. The main result of the present work is a novel estimate of the null distribution, computed from the eigenspectrum of the Gram matrix on the aggregate sample from P and Q, and having lower computational cost than the bootstrap. A proof of consistency of this estimate is provided. The performance of the null distribution estimate is compared with the bootstrap and parametric approaches on an artificial example, high dimensional multivariate data, and text.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Augmenting Feature-driven fMRI Analyses: Semi-supervised learning and resting state activity

Blaschko, M., Shelton, J., Bartels, A.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 126-134, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Resting state activity is brain activation that arises in the absence of any task, and is usually measured in awake subjects during prolonged fMRI scanning sessions where the only instruction given is to close the eyes and do nothing. It has been recognized in recent years that resting state activity is implicated in a wide variety of brain function. While certain networks of brain areas have different levels of activation at rest and during a task, there is nevertheless significant similarity between activations in the two cases. This suggests that recordings of resting state activity can be used as a source of unlabeled data to augment discriminative regression techniques in a semi-supervised setting. We evaluate this setting empirically yielding three main results: (i) regression tends to be improved by the use of Laplacian regularization even when no additional unlabeled data are available, (ii) resting state data seem to have a similar marginal distribution to that recorded during the execution of a visual processing task implying largely similar types of activation, and (iii) this source of information can be broadly exploited to improve the robustness of empirical inference in fMRI studies, an inherently data poor domain.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Non-linear System Identification: Visual Saliency Inferred from Eye-Movement Data

Wichmann, F., Kienzle, W., Schölkopf, B., Franz, M.

Journal of Vision, 9(8):article 32, 2009 (article)

Abstract
For simple visual patterns under the experimenter's control we impose which information, or features, an observer can use to solve a given perceptual task. For natural vision tasks, however, there are typically a multitude of potential features in a given visual scene which the visual system may be exploiting when analyzing it: edges, corners, contours, etc. Here we describe a novel non-linear system identification technique based on modern machine learning methods that allows the critical features an observer uses to be inferred directly from the observer's data. The method neither requires stimuli to be embedded in noise nor is it limited to linear perceptive fields (classification images). We demonstrate our technique by deriving the critical image features observers fixate in natural scenes (bottom-up visual saliency). Unlike previous studies where the relevant structure is determined manually—e.g. by selecting Gabors as visual filters—we do not make any assumptions in this regard, but numerically infer number and properties them from the eye-movement data. We show that center-surround patterns emerge as the optimal solution for predicting saccade targets from local image structure. The resulting model, a one-layer feed-forward network with contrast gain-control, is surprisingly simple compared to previously suggested saliency models. Nevertheless, our model is equally predictive. Furthermore, our findings are consistent with neurophysiological hardware in the superior colliculus. Bottom-up visual saliency may thus not be computed cortically as has been thought previously.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]


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mGene.web: a web service for accurate computational gene finding

Schweikert, G., Behr, J., Zien, A., Zeller, G., Ong, C., Sonnenburg, S., Rätsch, G.

Nucleic Acids Research, 37, pages: W312-6, 2009 (article)

Abstract
We describe mGene.web, a web service for the genome-wide prediction of protein coding genes from eukaryotic DNA sequences. It offers pre-trained models for the recognition of gene structures including untranslated regions in an increasing number of organisms. With mGene.web, users have the additional possibility to train the system with their own data for other organisms on the push of a button, a functionality that will greatly accelerate the annotation of newly sequenced genomes. The system is built in a highly modular way, such that individual components of the framework, like the promoter prediction tool or the splice site predictor, can be used autonomously. The underlying gene finding system mGene is based on discriminative machine learning techniques and its high accuracy has been demonstrated in an international competition on nematode genomes. mGene.web is available at http://www.mgene.org/web, it is free of charge and can be used for eukaryotic genomes of small to moderate size (several hundred Mbp).

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Fast subtree kernels on graphs

Shervashidze, N., Borgwardt, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 1660-1668, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this article, we propose fast subtree kernels on graphs. On graphs with n nodes and m edges and maximum degree d, these kernels comparing subtrees of height h can be computed in O(mh), whereas the classic subtree kernel by Ramon & G{\"a}rtner scales as O(n24dh). Key to this efficiency is the observation that the Weisfeiler-Lehman test of isomorphism from graph theory elegantly computes a subtree kernel as a byproduct. Our fast subtree kernels can deal with labeled graphs, scale up easily to large graphs and outperform state-of-the-art graph kernels on several classification benchmark datasets in terms of accuracy and runtime.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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One-shot scanning using de bruijn spaced grids

Ulusoy, A., Calakli, F., Taubin, G.

In Computer Vision Workshops (ICCV Workshops), 2009 IEEE 12th International Conference on, pages: 1786-1792, IEEE, 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we present a new one-shot method to reconstruct the shape of dynamic 3D objects and scenes based on active illumination. In common with other related prior-art methods, a static grid pattern is projected onto the scene, a video sequence of the illuminated scene is captured, a shape estimate is produced independently for each video frame, and the one-shot property is realized at the expense of space resolution. The main challenge in grid-based one-shot methods is to engineer the pattern and algorithms so that the correspondence between pattern grid points and their images can be established very fast and without uncertainty. We present an efficient one-shot method which exploits simple geometric constraints to solve the correspondence problem. We also introduce De Bruijn spaced grids, a novel grid pattern, and show with strong empirical data that the resulting scheme is much more robust compared to those based on uniform spaced grids.

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pdf link (url) DOI [BibTex]

pdf link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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An introduction to Kernel Learning Algorithms

Gehler, P., Schölkopf, B.

In Kernel Methods for Remote Sensing Data Analysis, pages: 25-48, 2, (Editors: Gustavo Camps-Valls and Lorenzo Bruzzone), Wiley, New York, NY, USA, 2009 (inbook)

Abstract
Kernel learning algorithms are currently becoming a standard tool in the area of machine learning and pattern recognition. In this chapter we review the fundamental theory of kernel learning. As the basic building block we introduce the kernel function, which provides an elegant and general way to compare possibly very complex objects. We then review the concept of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space and state the representer theorem. Finally we give an overview of the most prominent algorithms, which are support vector classification and regression, Gaussian Processes and kernel principal analysis. With multiple kernel learning and structured output prediction we also introduce some more recent advancements in the field.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Estimating human shape and pose from a single image

Guan, P., Weiss, A., Balan, A., Black, M. J.

In Int. Conf. on Computer Vision, ICCV, pages: 1381-1388, 2009 (inproceedings)

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pdf video - mov 25MB video - mp4 10MB YouTube Project Page [BibTex]

pdf video - mov 25MB video - mp4 10MB YouTube Project Page [BibTex]


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On feature combination for multiclass object classification

Gehler, P., Nowozin, S.

In Proceedings of the Twelfth IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision, pages: 221-228, ICCV, 2009, oral presentation (inproceedings)

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project page, code, data GoogleScholar pdf DOI [BibTex]

project page, code, data GoogleScholar pdf DOI [BibTex]


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Segmentation, Ordering and Multi-object Tracking Using Graphical Models

Wang, C., Gorce, M. D. L., Paragios, N.

In IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), 2009 (inproceedings)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Visual Object Discovery

Sinha, P., Balas, B., Ostrovsky, Y., Wulff, J.

In Object Categorization: Computer and Human Vision Perspectives, pages: 301-323, (Editors: S. J. Dickinson, A. Leonardis, B. Schiele, M.J. Tarr), Cambridge University Press, 2009 (inbook)

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Evaluating the potential of primary motor and premotor cortex for mutltidimensional neuroprosthetic control of complete reaching and grasping actions

Vargas-Irwin, C. E., Yadollahpour, P., Shakhnarovich, G., Black, M. J., Donoghue, J. P.

2009 Abstract Viewer and Itinerary Planner. Society for Neuroscience, Society for Neuroscience, 2009, Online (conference)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Modeling and Evaluation of Human-to-Robot Mapping of Grasps

Romero, J., Kjellström, H., Kragic, D.

In International Conference on Advanced Robotics (ICAR), pages: 1-6, 2009 (inproceedings)

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Pdf [BibTex]

Pdf [BibTex]


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An additive latent feature model for transparent object recognition

Fritz, M., Black, M., Bradski, G., Karayev, S., Darrell, T.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, NIPS, pages: 558-566, MIT Press, 2009 (inproceedings)

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pdf slides [BibTex]

pdf slides [BibTex]


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Let the kernel figure it out; Principled learning of pre-processing for kernel classifiers

Gehler, P., Nowozin, S.

In Proceedings of the Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pages: 2836-2843, IEEE Computer Society, 2009 (inproceedings)

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doi project page pdf [BibTex]

doi project page pdf [BibTex]


Thumb xl thumb screen shot 2012 10 06 at 12.04.52 pm
Monocular Real-Time 3D Articulated Hand Pose Estimation

Romero, J., Kjellström, H., Kragic, D.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 87-92, 2009 (inproceedings)

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Pdf [BibTex]

Pdf [BibTex]


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Grasp Recognition and Mapping on Humanoid Robots

Do, M., Romero, J., Kjellström, H., Azad, P., Asfour, T., Kragic, D., Dillmann, R.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 465-471, 2009 (inproceedings)

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Pdf Video [BibTex]

Pdf Video [BibTex]


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4D Cardiac Segmentation of the Epicardium and Left Ventricle

Pons-Moll, G., Tadmor, G., MacLeod, R. S., Rosenhahn, B., Brooks, D. H.

In World Congress of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering (WC), 2009 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Geometric Potential Force for the Deformable Model

Si Yong Yeo, Xianghua Xie, Igor Sazonov, Perumal Nithiarasu

In The 20th British Machine Vision Conference, pages: 1-11, 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a new external force field for deformable models which can be conve- niently generalized to high dimensions. The external force field is based on hypothesized interactions between the relative geometries of the deformable model and image gradi- ents. The evolution of the deformable model is solved using the level set method. The dynamic interaction forces between the geometries can greatly improve the deformable model performance in acquiring complex geometries and highly concave boundaries, and in dealing with weak image edges. The new deformable model can handle arbi- trary cross-boundary initializations. Here, we show that the proposed method achieve significant improvements when compared against existing state-of-the-art techniques.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Left Ventricular Regional Wall Curvedness and Wall Stress in Patients with Ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Liang Zhong, Yi Su, Si Yong Yeo, Ru San Tan Dhanjoo Ghista, Ghassan Kassab

American Journal of Physiology – Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 296(3):H573-84, 2009 (article)

Abstract
Geometric remodeling of the left ventricle (LV) after myocardial infarction is associated with changes in myocardial wall stress. The objective of this study was to determine the regional curvatures and wall stress based on three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions of the LV using MRI. Ten patients with ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) and 10 normal subjects underwent MRI scan. The IDCM patients also underwent delayed gadolinium-enhancement imaging to delineate the extent of myocardial infarct. Regional curvedness, local radii of curvature, and wall thickness were calculated. The percent curvedness change between end diastole and end systole was also calculated. In normal heart, a short- and long-axis two-dimensional analysis showed a 41 +/- 11% and 45 +/- 12% increase of the mean of peak systolic wall stress between basal and apical sections, respectively. However, 3-D analysis showed no significant difference in peak systolic wall stress from basal and apical sections (P = 0.298, ANOVA). LV shape differed between IDCM patients and normal subjects in several ways: LV shape was more spherical (sphericity index = 0.62 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.52 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05), curvedness at end diastole (mean for 16 segments = 0.034 +/- 0.0056 vs. 0.040 +/- 0.0071 mm(-1), P < 0.001) and end systole (mean for 16 segments = 0.037 +/- 0.0068 vs. 0.067 +/- 0.020 mm(-1), P < 0.001) was affected by infarction, and peak systolic wall stress was significantly increased at each segment in IDCM patients. The 3-D quantification of regional wall stress by cardiac MRI provides more precise evaluation of cardiac mechanics. Identification of regional curvedness and wall stresses helps delineate the mechanisms of LV remodeling in IDCM and may help guide therapeutic LV restoration.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Level Set Based Automatic Segmentation of Human Aorta

Si Yong Yeo, Xianghua Xie, Igor Sazonov, Perumal Nithiarasu

In International Conference on Computational & Mathematical Biomedical Engineering, pages: 242-245, 2009 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Curvature-Based Approach for Left Ventricular Shape Analysis from Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Si Yong Yeo, Liang Zhong, Yi Su, Ru San Tan, Dhanjoo Ghista

Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing, 47(3):313-322, 2009 (article)

Abstract
It is believed that left ventricular (LV) regional shape is indicative of LV regional function, and cardiac pathologies are often associated with regional alterations in ventricular shape. In this article, we present a set of procedures for evaluating regional LV surface shape from anatomically accurate models reconstructed from cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. LV surface curvatures are computed using local surface fitting method, which enables us to assess regional LV shape and its variation. Comparisons are made between normal and diseased hearts. It is illustrated that LV surface curvatures at different regions of the normal heart are higher than those of the diseased heart. Also, the normal heart experiences a larger change in regional curvedness during contraction than the diseased heart. It is believed that with a wide range of dataset being evaluated, this approach will provide a new and efficient way of quantifying LV regional function.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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In Defense of Orthonormality Constraints for Nonrigid Structure from Motion

Akhter, I., Sheikh, Y., Khan, S.

In Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2009. CVPR 2009. IEEE Conference on, pages: 2447-2453, 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In factorization approaches to nonrigid structure from motion, the 3D shape of a deforming object is usually modeled as a linear combination of a small number of basis shapes. The original approach to simultaneously estimate the shape basis and nonrigid structure exploited orthonormality constraints for metric rectification. Recently, it has been asserted that structure recovery through orthonormality constraints alone is inherently ambiguous and cannot result in a unique solution. This assertion has been accepted as conventional wisdom and is the justification of many remedial heuristics in literature. Our key contribution is to prove that orthonormality constraints are in fact sufficient to recover the 3D structure from image observations alone. We characterize the true nature of the ambiguity in using orthonormality constraints for the shape basis and show that it has no impact on structure reconstruction. We conclude from our experimentation that the primary challenge in using shape basis for nonrigid structure from motion is the difficulty in the optimization problem rather than the ambiguity in orthonormality constraints.

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Dynamic distortion correction for endoscopy systems with exchangeable optics

Stehle, T., Hennes, M., Gross, S., Behrens, A., Wulff, J., Aach, T.

In Bildverarbeitung für die Medizin 2009, pages: 142-146, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Endoscopic images are strongly affected by lens distortion caused by the use of wide angle lenses. In case of endoscopy systems with exchangeable optics, e.g. in bladder endoscopy or sinus endoscopy, the camera sensor and the optics do not form a rigid system but they can be shifted and rotated with respect to each other during an examination. This flexibility has a major impact on the location of the distortion centre as it is moved along with the optics. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for the dynamic correction of lens distortion in cystoscopy which is based on a one time calibration. For the compensation, we combine a conventional static method for distortion correction with an algorithm to detect the position and the orientation of the elliptic field of view. This enables us to estimate the position of the distortion centre according to the relative movement of camera and optics. Therewith, a distortion correction for arbitrary rotation angles and shifts becomes possible without performing static calibrations for every possible combination of shifts and angles beforehand.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Computational mechanisms for the recognition of time sequences of images in the visual cortex

Tan, C., Jhuang, H., Singer, J., Serre, T., Sheinberg, D., Poggio, T.

Society for Neuroscience, 2009 (conference)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Interactive Inverse Kinematics for Monocular Motion Estimation

Morten Engell-Norregaard, Soren Hauberg, Jerome Lapuyade, Kenny Erleben, Kim S. Pedersen

In The 6th Workshop on Virtual Reality Interaction and Physical Simulation (VRIPHYS), 2009 (inproceedings)

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Conference site Paper site [BibTex]

Conference site Paper site [BibTex]


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A Comprehensive Grasp Taxonomy

Feix, T., Pawlik, R., Schmiedmayer, H., Romero, J., Kragic, D.

In Robotics, Science and Systems: Workshop on Understanding the Human Hand for Advancing Robotic Manipulation, 2009 (inproceedings)

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Pdf [BibTex]

Pdf [BibTex]


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Population coding of ground truth motion in natural scenes in the early visual system

Stanley, G., Black, M. J., Lewis, J., Desbordes, G., Jin, J., Alonso, J.

COSYNE, 2009 (conference)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Segmentation of Human Upper Airway Using a Level Set Based Deformable Model

Si Yong Yeo, Xianghua Xie, Igor Sazonov, Perumal Nithiarasu

In The 13th Medical Image Understanding and Analysis, 2009 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Three Dimensional Monocular Human Motion Analysis in End-Effector Space

Soren Hauberg, Jerome Lapuyade, Morten Engell-Norregaard, Kenny Erleben, Kim S. Pedersen

In Energy Minimization Methods in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 5681, pages: 235-248, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: Cremers, Daniel and Boykov, Yuri and Blake, Andrew and Schmidt, Frank), Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2009 (inproceedings)

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Publishers site Paper site PDF [BibTex]

Publishers site Paper site PDF [BibTex]


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Decoding visual motion from correlated firing of thalamic neurons

Stanley, G. B., Black, M. J., Desbordes, G., Jin, J., Wang, Y., Alonso, J.

2009 Abstract Viewer and Itinerary Planner. Society for Neuroscience, Society for Neuroscience, 2009 (conference)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2007


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HPLC analysis and pharmacokinetic study of quercitrin and isoquercitrin in rat plasma after administration of Hypericum japonicum thunb. extract.

Li, J., Wang, W., Zhang, L., Chen, H., Bi, S.

Biomedical Chromatography, 22(4):374-378, December 2007 (article)

Abstract
A simple HPLC method was developed for determination of quercitrin and isoquercitrin in rat plasma. Reversed-phase HPLC was employed for the quantitative analysis using kaempferol-3-O--d-glucopyranoside-7-O--l-rhamnoside as an internal standard. Following extraction from the plasma samples with ethyl acetate-isopropanol (95:5, v/v), these two compounds were successfully separated on a Luna C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) with isocratic elution of acetonitrile-0.5% aqueous acetic acid (17:83, v/v) as the mobile phase. The flow-rate was set at 1 mL/min and the eluent was detected at 350 nm for both quercitrin and isoquercitrin. The method was linear over the studied ranges of 50-6000 and 50-5000 ng/mL for quercitrin and isoquercitrin, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions of the analysis were better than 13.1 and 13.2%, respectively. The lower limits of quantitation for quercitrin and isoquercitrin in plasma were both of 50 ng/mL. The mean extraction recoveries were 73 and 61% for quercitrin and i soquercitrin, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic studies of the two analytes in rat plasma after the oral administration of Hypericum japonicum thunb. ethanol extract.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2007



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Graph sharpening plus graph integration: a synergy that improves protein functional classification

Shin, HH., Lisewski, AM., Lichtarge, O.

Bioinformatics, 23(23):3217-3224, December 2007 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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A Tutorial on Spectral Clustering

von Luxburg, U.

Statistics and Computing, 17(4):395-416, December 2007 (article)

Abstract
In recent years, spectral clustering has become one of the most popular modern clustering algorithms. It is simple to implement, can be solved efficiently by standard linear algebra software, and very often outperforms traditional clustering algorithms such as the k-means algorithm. On the first glance spectral clustering appears slightly mysterious, and it is not obvious to see why it works at all and what it really does. The goal of this tutorial is to give some intuition on those questions. We describe different graph Laplacians and their basic properties, present the most common spectral clustering algorithms, and derive those algorithms from scratch by several different approaches. Advantages and disadvantages of the different spectral clustering algorithms are discussed.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]