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2003


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How Many Neighbors To Consider in Pattern Pre-selection for Support Vector Classifiers?

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of INNS-IEEE International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN 2003), pages: 565-570, IJCNN, July 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Training support vector classifiers (SVC) requires large memory and long cpu time when the pattern set is large. To alleviate the computational burden in SVC training, we previously proposed a preprocessing algorithm which selects only the patterns in the overlap region around the decision boundary, based on neighborhood properties [8], [9], [10]. The k-nearest neighbors’ class label entropy for each pattern was used to estimate the pattern’s proximity to the decision boundary. The value of parameter k is critical, yet has been determined by a rather ad-hoc fashion. We propose in this paper a systematic procedure to determine k and show its effectiveness through experiments.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

2003


PDF [BibTex]


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On the Representation, Learning and Transfer of Spatio-Temporal Movement Characteristics

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Mezger, J., Giese, MA.

In Humanoids Proceedings, pages: 0-0, Humanoids Proceedings, July 2003, electronical version (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we present a learning-based approach for the modelling of complex movement sequences. Based on the method of Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models (STMMS. We derive a hierarchical algorithm that, in a first step, identifies automatically movement elements in movement sequences based on a coarse spatio-temporal description, and in a second step models these movement primitives by approximation through linear combinations of learned example movement trajectories. We describe the different steps of the algorithm and show how it can be applied for modelling and synthesis of complex sequences of human movements that contain movement elements with variable style. The proposed method is demonstrated on different applications of movement representation relevant for imitation learning of movement styles in humanoid robotics.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Loss Functions and Optimization Methods for Discriminative Learning of Label Sequences

Altun, Y., Johnson, M., Hofmann, T.

In pages: 145-152, (Editors: Collins, M. , M. Steedman), ACL, East Stroudsburg, PA, USA, Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP) , July 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Discriminative models have been of interest in the NLP community in recent years. Previous research has shown that they are advantageous over generative models. In this paper, we investigate how different objective functions and optimization methods affect the performance of the classifiers in the discriminative learning framework. We focus on the sequence labelling problem, particularly POS tagging and NER tasks. Our experiments show that changing the objective function is not as effective as changing the features included in the model.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning Theory, Capacity and Complexity

Schölkopf, B.

Complexity, 8(4):87-94, July 2003 (article)

Abstract
We give an exposition of the ideas of statistical learning theory, followed by a discussion of how a reinterpretation of the insights of learning theory could potentially also benefit our understanding of a certain notion of complexity.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Time Complexity Analysis of Fast Pattern Selection Algorithm for SVM

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Data Mining Conference, pages: 221-231, Korean Data Mining Conference, June 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dealing with large Diagonals in Kernel Matrices

Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Eskin, E., Leslie, C., Noble, W.

Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 55(2):391-408, June 2003 (article)

Abstract
In kernel methods, all the information about the training data is contained in the Gram matrix. If this matrix has large diagonal values, which arises for many types of kernels, then kernel methods do not perform well: We propose and test several methods for dealing with this problem by reducing the dynamic range of the matrix while preserving the positive definiteness of the Hessian of the quadratic programming problem that one has to solve when training a Support Vector Machine, which is a common kernel approach for pattern recognition.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Fast Pattern Selection for Support Vector Classifiers

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In PAKDD 2003, pages: 376-387, (Editors: Whang, K.-Y. , J. Jeon, K. Shim, J. Srivastava), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, May 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Training SVM requires large memory and long cpu time when the pattern set is large. To alleviate the computational burden in SVM training, we propose a fast preprocessing algorithm which selects only the patterns near the decision boundary. Preliminary simulation results were promising: Up to two orders of magnitude, training time reduction was achieved including the preprocessing, without any loss in classification accuracies.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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The em Algorithm for Kernel Matrix Completion with Auxiliary Data

Tsuda, K., Akaho, S., Asai, K.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 4, pages: 67-81, May 2003 (article)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Scaling Reinforcement Learning Paradigms for Motor Control

Peters, J., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In JSNC 2003, 10, pages: 1-7, 10th Joint Symposium on Neural Computation (JSNC), May 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Reinforcement learning offers a general framework to explain reward related learning in artificial and biological motor control. However, current reinforcement learning methods rarely scale to high dimensional movement systems and mainly operate in discrete, low dimensional domains like game-playing, artificial toy problems, etc. This drawback makes them unsuitable for application to human or bio-mimetic motor control. In this poster, we look at promising approaches that can potentially scale and suggest a novel formulation of the actor-critic algorithm which takes steps towards alleviating the current shortcomings. We argue that methods based on greedy policies are not likely to scale into high-dimensional domains as they are problematic when used with function approximation – a must when dealing with continuous domains. We adopt the path of direct policy gradient based policy improvements since they avoid the problems of unstabilizing dynamics encountered in traditional value iteration based updates. While regular policy gradient methods have demonstrated promising results in the domain of humanoid notor control, we demonstrate that these methods can be significantly improved using the natural policy gradient instead of the regular policy gradient. Based on this, it is proved that Kakade’s ‘average natural policy gradient’ is indeed the true natural gradient. A general algorithm for estimating the natural gradient, the Natural Actor-Critic algorithm, is introduced. This algorithm converges with probability one to the nearest local minimum in Riemannian space of the cost function. The algorithm outperforms nonnatural policy gradients by far in a cart-pole balancing evaluation, and offers a promising route for the development of reinforcement learning for truly high-dimensionally continuous state-action systems. Keywords: Reinforcement learning, neurodynamic programming, actorcritic methods, policy gradient methods, natural policy gradient

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Constructing Descriptive and Discriminative Non-linear Features: Rayleigh Coefficients in Kernel Feature Spaces

Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 25(5):623-628, May 2003 (article)

Abstract
We incorporate prior knowledge to construct nonlinear algorithms for invariant feature extraction and discrimination. Employing a unified framework in terms of a nonlinearized variant of the Rayleigh coefficient, we propose nonlinear generalizations of Fisher‘s discriminant and oriented PCA using support vector kernel functions. Extensive simulations show the utility of our approach.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel-based nonlinear blind source separation

Harmeling, S., Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 15(5):1089-1124, May 2003 (article)

Abstract
We propose kTDSEP, a kernel-based algorithm for nonlinear blind source separation (BSS). It combines complementary research fields: kernel feature spaces and BSS using temporal information. This yields an efficient algorithm for nonlinear BSS with invertible nonlinearity. Key assumptions are that the kernel feature space is chosen rich enough to approximate the nonlinearity and that signals of interest contain temporal information. Both assumptions are fulfilled for a wide set of real-world applications. The algorithm works as follows: First, the data are (implicitly) mapped to a high (possibly infinite)—dimensional kernel feature space. In practice, however, the data form a smaller submanifold in feature space—even smaller than the number of training data points—a fact that has already been used by, for example, reduced set techniques for support vector machines. We propose to adapt to this effective dimension as a preprocessing step and to construct an orthonormal basis of this submanifold. The latter dimension-reduction step is essential for making the subsequent application of BSS methods computationally and numerically tractable. In the reduced space, we use a BSS algorithm that is based on second-order temporal decorrelation. Finally, we propose a selection procedure to obtain the original sources from the extracted nonlinear components automatically. Experiments demonstrate the excellent performance and efficiency of our kTDSEP algorithm for several problems of nonlinear BSS and for more than two sources.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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A case based comparison of identification with neural network and Gaussian process models.

Kocijan, J., Banko, B., Likar, B., Girard, A., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Control Systems and Signal Processing ICONS 2003, 1, pages: 137-142, (Editors: Ruano, E.A.), Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Control Systems and Signal Processing ICONS, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper an alternative approach to black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems is compared with the more established approach of using artificial neural networks. The Gaussian process prior approach is a representative of non-parametric modelling approaches. It was compared on a pH process modelling case study. The purpose of modelling was to use the model for control design. The comparison revealed that even though Gaussian process models can be effectively used for modelling dynamic systems caution has to be axercised when signals are selected.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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On-Line One-Class Support Vector Machines. An Application to Signal Segmentation

Gretton, A., Desobry, ..

In IEEE ICASSP Vol. 2, pages: 709-712, IEEE ICASSP, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we describe an efficient algorithm to sequentially update a density support estimate obtained using one-class support vector machines. The solution provided is an exact solution, which proves to be far more computationally attractive than a batch approach. This deterministic technique is applied to the problem of audio signal segmentation, with simulations demonstrating the computational performance gain on toy data sets, and the accuracy of the segmentation on audio signals.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Blind separation of post-nonlinear mixtures using gaussianizing transformations and temporal decorrelation

Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Harmeling, S., Müller, K.

In ICA 2003, pages: 269-274, (Editors: Amari, S.-I. , A. Cichocki, S. Makino, N. Murata), 4th International Symposium on Independent Component Analysis and Blind Signal Separation, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
At the previous workshop (ICA2001) we proposed the ACE-TD method that reduces the post-nonlinear blind source separation problem (PNL BSS) to a linear BSS problem. The method utilizes the Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE) algorithm to approximately invert the (post-){non-linear} functions. In this contribution, we propose an alternative procedure called Gaussianizing transformation, which is motivated by the fact that linearly mixed signals before nonlinear transformation are approximately Gaussian distributed. This heuristic, but simple and efficient procedure yields similar results as the ACE method and can thus be used as a fast and effective equalization method. After equalizing the nonlinearities, temporal decorrelation separation (TDSEP) allows us to recover the source signals. Numerical simulations on realistic examples are performed to compare "Gauss-TD" with "ACE-TD".

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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The Kernel Mutual Information

Gretton, A., Herbrich, R., Smola, A.

In IEEE ICASSP Vol. 4, pages: 880-883, IEEE ICASSP, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We introduce a new contrast function, the kernel mutual information (KMI), to measure the degree of independence of continuous random variables. This contrast function provides an approximate upper bound on the mutual information, as measured near independence, and is based on a kernel density estimate of the mutual information between a discretised approximation of the continuous random variables. We show that Bach and Jordan‘s kernel generalised variance (KGV) is also an upper bound on the same kernel density estimate, but is looser. Finally, we suggest that the addition of a regularising term in the KGV causes it to approach the KMI, which motivates the introduction of this regularisation.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Analysing ICA component by injection noise

Harmeling, S., Meinecke, F., Müller, K.

In ICA 2003, pages: 149-154, (Editors: Amari, S.-I. , A. Cichocki, S. Makino, N. Murata), 4th International Symposium on Independent Component Analysis and Blind Signal Separation, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Usually, noise is considered to be destructive. We present a new method that constructively injects noise to assess the reliability and the group structure of empirical ICA components. Simulations show that the true root-mean squared angle distances between the real sources and some source estimates can be approximated by our method. In a toy experiment, we see that we are also able to reveal the underlying group structure of extracted ICA components. Furthermore, an experiment with fetal ECG data demonstrates that our approach is useful for exploratory data analysis of real-world data.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Tractable Inference for Probabilistic Data Models

Csato, L., Opper, M., Winther, O.

Complexity, 8(4):64-68, April 2003 (article)

Abstract
We present an approximation technique for probabilistic data models with a large number of hidden variables, based on ideas from statistical physics. We give examples for two nontrivial applications. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

ei

PDF GZIP Web [BibTex]

PDF GZIP Web [BibTex]


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Feature selection and transduction for prediction of molecular bioactivity for drug design

Weston, J., Perez-Cruz, F., Bousquet, O., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B.

Bioinformatics, 19(6):764-771, April 2003 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: In drug discovery a key task is to identify characteristics that separate active (binding) compounds from inactive (non-binding) ones. An automated prediction system can help reduce resources necessary to carry out this task. Results: Two methods for prediction of molecular bioactivity for drug design are introduced and shown to perform well in a data set previously studied as part of the KDD (Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining) Cup 2001. The data is characterized by very few positive examples, a very large number of features (describing three-dimensional properties of the molecules) and rather different distributions between training and test data. Two techniques are introduced specifically to tackle these problems: a feature selection method for unbalanced data and a classifier which adapts to the distribution of the the unlabeled test data (a so-called transductive method). We show both techniques improve identification performance and in conjunction provide an improvement over using only one of the techniques. Our results suggest the importance of taking into account the characteristics in this data which may also be relevant in other problems of a similar type.

ei

Web [BibTex]


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Use of the Zero-Norm with Linear Models and Kernel Methods

Weston, J., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Tipping, M.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 3, pages: 1439-1461, March 2003 (article)

Abstract
We explore the use of the so-called zero-norm of the parameters of linear models in learning. Minimization of such a quantity has many uses in a machine learning context: for variable or feature selection, minimizing training error and ensuring sparsity in solutions. We derive a simple but practical method for achieving these goals and discuss its relationship to existing techniques of minimizing the zero-norm. The method boils down to implementing a simple modification of vanilla SVM, namely via an iterative multiplicative rescaling of the training data. Applications we investigate which aid our discussion include variable and feature selection on biological microarray data, and multicategory classification.

ei

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]


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Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models for Representation of complex movements for Imitation Learning

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Franz, MO., Giese, M.

In 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, (2):453-458, (Editors: Nunes, U., A. de Almeida, A. Bejczy, K. Kosuge and J.A.T. Machado), 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, January 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Hyperkernels

Ong, CS., Smola, AJ., Williamson, RC.

In pages: 495-502, 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Variable and Feature Selection.

Guyon, I., Elisseeff, A.

Journal of Machine Learning, 3, pages: 1157-1182, 2003 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Feature Selection for Support Vector Machines by Means of Genetic Algorithms

Fröhlich, H., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, pages: 142-148, 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Propagation of Uncertainty in Bayesian Kernel Models - Application to Multiple-Step Ahead Forecasting

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Girard, A., Larsen, J., Rasmussen, CE.

In IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2, pages: 701-704, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The object of Bayesian modelling is the predictive distribution, which in a forecasting scenario enables improved estimates of forecasted values and their uncertainties. In this paper we focus on reliably estimating the predictive mean and variance of forecasted values using Bayesian kernel based models such as the Gaussian Process and the Relevance Vector Machine. We derive novel analytic expressions for the predictive mean and variance for Gaussian kernel shapes under the assumption of a Gaussian input distribution in the static case, and of a recursive Gaussian predictive density in iterative forecasting. The capability of the method is demonstrated for forecasting of time-series and compared to approximate methods.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Clustering of Images using their Joint Segmentation

Seldin, Y., Starik, S., Werman, M.

In The 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV 2003), pages: 1-24, 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV), 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Dynamics of a rigid body in a Stokes fluid

Gonzalez, O., Graf, ABA., Maddocks, JH.

Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2003 (article) Accepted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A novel transient heater-foil technique for liquid crystal experiments on film cooled surfaces

Vogel, G., Graf, ABA., von Wolfersdorf, J., Weigand, B.

ASME Journal of Turbomachinery, 125, pages: 529-537, 2003 (article)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks (2nd edition), pages: 1119-1125, (Editors: MA Arbib), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Methods and Their Applications to Signal Processing

Bousquet, O., Perez-Cruz, F.

In Proceedings. (ICASSP ‘03), Special Session on Kernel Methods, pages: 860 , ICASSP, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently introduced in Machine Learning, the notion of kernels has drawn a lot of interest as it allows to obtain non-linear algorithms from linear ones in a simple and elegant manner. This, in conjunction with the introduction of new linear classification methods such as the Support Vector Machines has produced significant progress. The successes of such algorithms is now spreading as they are applied to more and more domains. Many Signal Processing problems, by their non-linear and high-dimensional nature may benefit from such techniques. We give an overview of kernel methods and their recent applications.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Predictive control with Gaussian process models

Kocijan, J., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE., Likar, B.

In Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon 2003: Computer as a Tool, pages: 352-356, (Editors: Zajc, B. and M. Tkal), Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon: Computer as a Tool, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper describes model-based predictive control based on Gaussian processes.Gaussian process models provide a probabilistic non-parametric modelling approach for black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems. It offers more insight in variance of obtained model response, as well as fewer parameters to determine than other models. The Gaussian processes can highlight areas of the input space where prediction quality is poor, due to the lack of data or its complexity, by indicating the higher variance around the predicted mean. This property is used in predictive control, where optimisation of control signal takes the variance information into account. The predictive control principle is demonstrated on a simulated example of nonlinear system.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Extension of the nu-SVM range for classification

Perez-Cruz, F., Weston, J., Herrmann, D., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Learning Theory: Methods, Models and Applications, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Sciences, Vol. 190, 190, pages: 179-196, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Sciences, (Editors: J Suykens and G Horvath and S Basu and C Micchelli and J Vandewalle), IOS Press, Amsterdam, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microarrays: How Many Do You Need?

Zien, A., Fluck, J., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Journal of Computational Biology, 10(3-4):653-667, 2003 (article)

Abstract
We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. We show that current knowledge allows for the construction of models that look realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes and derive prototypical parameters from real data sets. Such models allow investigation of the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class, the fold changes in expression that are desired to be detected, the detection sensitivity of the microarrays, and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at www.scai.fhg.de/special/bio/howmanyarrays/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular settings.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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New Approaches to Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O.

Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 55(2):371-389, 2003 (article)

Abstract
We present new tools from probability theory that can be applied to the analysis of learning algorithms. These tools allow to derive new bounds on the generalization performance of learning algorithms and to propose alternative measures of the complexity of the learning task, which in turn can be used to derive new learning algorithms.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Distance-based classification with Lipschitz functions

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O.

In Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, pages: 314-328, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. and M.K. Warmuth), Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to develop a framework for large margin classification in metric spaces. We want to find a generalization of linear decision functions for metric spaces and define a corresponding notion of margin such that the decision function separates the training points with a large margin. It will turn out that using Lipschitz functions as decision functions, the inverse of the Lipschitz constant can be interpreted as the size of a margin. In order to construct a clean mathematical setup we isometrically embed the given metric space into a Banach space and the space of Lipschitz functions into its dual space. Our approach leads to a general large margin algorithm for classification in metric spaces. To analyze this algorithm, we first prove a representer theorem. It states that there exists a solution which can be expressed as linear combination of distances to sets of training points. Then we analyze the Rademacher complexity of some Lipschitz function classes. The generality of the Lipschitz approach can be seen from the fact that several well-known algorithms are special cases of the Lipschitz algorithm, among them the support vector machine, the linear programming machine, and the 1-nearest neighbor classifier.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B.

In Recent Advances and Trends in Nonparametric Statistics , pages: 3-17, (Editors: MG Akritas and DN Politis), Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning and Kernel Methods in Bioinformatics

Schölkopf, B., Guyon, I., Weston, J.

In Artificial Intelligence and Heuristic Methods in Bioinformatics, 183, pages: 1-21, 3, (Editors: P Frasconi und R Shamir), IOS Press, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Semi-Supervised Learning through Principal Directions Estimation

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B., Weston, J.

In ICML Workshop, The Continuum from Labeled to Unlabeled Data in Machine Learning & Data Mining, pages: 7, ICML Workshop: The Continuum from Labeled to Unlabeled Data in Machine Learning & Data Mining, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe methods for taking into account unlabeled data in the training of a kernel-based classifier, such as a Support Vector Machines (SVM). We propose two approaches utilizing unlabeled points in the vicinity of labeled ones. Both of the approaches effectively modify the metric of the pattern space, either by using non-spherical Gaussian density estimates which are determined using EM, or by modifying the kernel function using displacement vectors computed from pairs of unlabeled and labeled points. The latter is linked to techniques for training invariant SVMs. We present experimental results indicating that the proposed technique can lead to substantial improvements of classification accuracy.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning and Kernel Methods

Navia-Vázquez, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Adaptivity and Learning—An Interdisciplinary Debate, pages: 161-186, (Editors: R.Kühn and R Menzel and W Menzel and U Ratsch and MM Richter and I-O Stamatescu), Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Short Introduction to Learning with Kernels

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Proceedings of the Machine Learning Summer School, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 2600, pages: 41-64, LNAI 2600, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian Kernel Methods

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advanced Lectures on Machine Learning, Machine Learning Summer School 2002, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 2600, LNAI 2600, pages: 65-117, 0, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Gene expression in chondrocytes assessed with use of microarrays

Aigner, T., Zien, A., Hanisch, D., Zimmer, R.

Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 85(Suppl 2):117-123, 2003 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Machine Learning with Hyperkernels

Ong, CS., Smola, AJ.

In pages: 568-575, 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Gaussian Processes to Speed up Hybrid Monte Carlo for Expensive Bayesian Integrals

Rasmussen, CE.

In Bayesian Statistics 7, pages: 651-659, (Editors: J. M. Bernardo, M. J. Bayarri, J. O. Berger, A. P. Dawid, D. Heckerman, A. F. M. Smith and M. West), Bayesian Statistics 7, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) is often the method of choice for computing Bayesian integrals that are not analytically tractable. However the success of this method may require a very large number of evaluations of the (un-normalized) posterior and its partial derivatives. In situations where the posterior is computationally costly to evaluate, this may lead to an unacceptable computational load for HMC. I propose to use a Gaussian Process model of the (log of the) posterior for most of the computations required by HMC. Within this scheme only occasional evaluation of the actual posterior is required to guarantee that the samples generated have exactly the desired distribution, even if the GP model is somewhat inaccurate. The method is demonstrated on a 10 dimensional problem, where 200 evaluations suffice for the generation of 100 roughly independent points from the posterior. Thus, the proposed scheme allows Bayesian treatment of models with posteriors that are computationally demanding, such as models involving computer simulation.

ei

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Dimension Reduction Based on Orthogonality — a Decorrelation Method in ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Artificial Neural Networks and Neural Information Processing - ICANN/ICONIP 2003, pages: 132-139, (Editors: O Kaynak and E Alpaydin and E Oja and L Xu), Springer, Berlin, Germany, International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks and International Conference on Neural Information Processing, ICANN/ICONIP, 2003, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 2714 (inproceedings)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Stability of ensembles of kernel machines

Elisseeff, A., Pontil, M.

In 190, pages: 111-124, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Science, (Editors: Suykens, J., G. Horvath, S. Basu, C. Micchelli and J. Vandewalle), IOS press, Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1996


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Quality Prediction of Steel Products using Neural Networks

Shin, H., Jhee, W.

In Proc. of the Korean Expert System Conference, pages: 112-124, Korean Expert System Society Conference, November 1996 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

1996


[BibTex]


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Comparison of view-based object recognition algorithms using realistic 3D models

Blanz, V., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H., Burges, C., Vapnik, V., Vetter, T.

In Artificial Neural Networks: ICANN 96, LNCS, vol. 1112, pages: 251-256, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: C von der Malsburg and W von Seelen and JC Vorbrüggen and B Sendhoff), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 6th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, July 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Two view-based object recognition algorithms are compared: (1) a heuristic algorithm based on oriented filters, and (2) a support vector learning machine trained on low-resolution images of the objects. Classification performance is assessed using a high number of images generated by a computer graphics system under precisely controlled conditions. Training- and test-images show a set of 25 realistic three-dimensional models of chairs from viewing directions spread over the upper half of the viewing sphere. The percentage of correct identification of all 25 objects is measured.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Incorporating invariances in support vector learning machines

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Vapnik, V.

In Artificial Neural Networks: ICANN 96, LNCS vol. 1112, pages: 47-52, (Editors: C von der Malsburg and W von Seelen and JC Vorbrüggen and B Sendhoff), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 6th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, July 1996, volume 1112 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science (inproceedings)

Abstract
Developed only recently, support vector learning machines achieve high generalization ability by minimizing a bound on the expected test error; however, so far there existed no way of adding knowledge about invariances of a classification problem at hand. We present a method of incorporating prior knowledge about transformation invariances by applying transformations to support vectors, the training examples most critical for determining the classification boundary.

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PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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A practical Monte Carlo implementation of Bayesian learning

Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 8, pages: 598-604, (Editors: Touretzky, D.S. , M.C. Mozer, M.E. Hasselmo), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Ninth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A practical method for Bayesian training of feed-forward neural networks using sophisticated Monte Carlo methods is presented and evaluated. In reasonably small amounts of computer time this approach outperforms other state-of-the-art methods on 5 datalimited tasks from real world domains.

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PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Gaussian Processes for Regression

Williams, CKI., Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 8, pages: 514-520, (Editors: Touretzky, D.S. , M.C. Mozer, M.E. Hasselmo), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Ninth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Bayesian analysis of neural networks is difficult because a simple prior over weights implies a complex prior over functions. We investigate the use of a Gaussian process prior over functions, which permits the predictive Bayesian analysis for fixed values of hyperparameters to be carried out exactly using matrix operations. Two methods, using optimization and averaging (via Hybrid Monte Carlo) over hyperparameters have been tested on a number of challenging problems and have produced excellent results.

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PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]