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2013


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im3shape: a maximum likelihood galaxy shear measurement code for cosmic gravitational lensing

Zuntz, J., Kacprzak, T., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M., Rowe, B., Bridle, S.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 434(2):1604-1618, Oxford University Press, 2013 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

2013


DOI [BibTex]


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Accurate detection of differential RNA processing

Drewe, P., Stegle, O., Hartmann, L., Kahles, A., Bohnert, R., Wachter, A., Borgwardt, K. M., Rätsch, G.

Nucleic Acids Research, 41(10):5189-5198, 2013 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Detecting regulatory gene–environment interactions with unmeasured environmental factors

Fusi, N., Lippert, C., Borgwardt, K. M., Lawrence, N. D., Stegle, O.

Bioinformatics, 29(11):1382-1389, 2013 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Fragmentation of Slow Wave Sleep after Onset of Complete Locked-In State

Soekadar, S. R., Born, J., Birbaumer, N., Bensch, M., Halder, S., Murguialday, A. R., Gharabaghi, A., Nijboer, F., Schölkopf, B., Martens, S.

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 9(9):951-953, 2013 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structural learning

Braun, D

Scholarpedia, 8(10):12312, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
Structural learning in motor control refers to a metalearning process whereby an agent extracts (abstract) invariants from its sensorimotor stream when experiencing a range of environments that share similar structure. Such invariants can then be exploited for faster generalization and learning-to-learn when experiencing novel, but related task environments.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions

Grau-Moya, J, Hez, E, Pezzulo, G, Braun, DA

Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 10(87):1-11, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
Decision-makers have been shown to rely on probabilistic models for perception and action. However, these models can be incorrect or partially wrong in which case the decision-maker has to cope with model uncertainty. Model uncertainty has recently also been shown to be an important determinant of sensorimotor behaviour in humans that can lead to risk-sensitive deviations from Bayes optimal behaviour towards worst-case or best-case outcomes. Here, we investigate the effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions similar to the stag-hunt game, where players develop models about the other player and decide between a pay-off-dominant cooperative solution and a risk-dominant, non-cooperative solution. In simulations, we show that players who allow for optimistic deviations from their opponent model are much more likely to converge to cooperative outcomes. We also implemented this agent model in a virtual reality environment, and let human subjects play against a virtual player. In this game, subjects' pay-offs were experienced as forces opposing their movements. During the experiment, we manipulated the risk sensitivity of the computer player and observed human responses. We found not only that humans adaptively changed their level of cooperation depending on the risk sensitivity of the computer player but also that their initial play exhibited characteristic risk-sensitive biases. Our results suggest that model uncertainty is an important determinant of cooperation in two-player sensorimotor interactions.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Thermodynamics as a theory of decision-making with information-processing costs

Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A, 469(2153):1-18, May 2013 (article)

Abstract
Perfectly rational decision-makers maximize expected utility, but crucially ignore the resource costs incurred when determining optimal actions. Here, we propose a thermodynamically inspired formalization of bounded rational decision-making where information processing is modelled as state changes in thermodynamic systems that can be quantified by differences in free energy. By optimizing a free energy, bounded rational decision-makers trade off expected utility gains and information-processing costs measured by the relative entropy. As a result, the bounded rational decision-making problem can be rephrased in terms of well-known variational principles from statistical physics. In the limit when computational costs are ignored, the maximum expected utility principle is recovered. We discuss links to existing decision-making frameworks and applications to human decision-making experiments that are at odds with expected utility theory. Since most of the mathematical machinery can be borrowed from statistical physics, the main contribution is to re-interpret the formalism of thermodynamic free-energy differences in terms of bounded rational decision-making and to discuss its relationship to human decision-making experiments.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]