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2016


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The population of long-period transiting exoplanets

Foreman-Mackey, D., Morton, T. D., Hogg, D. W., Agol, E., Schölkopf, B.

The Astronomical Journal, 152(6):206, 2016 (article)

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link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

2016


link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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An overview of quantitative approaches in Gestalt perception

Jäkel, F., Singh, M., Wichmann, F. A., Herzog, M. H.

Vision Research, 126, pages: 3-8, 2016 (article)

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Causal and statistical learning

Schölkopf, B., Janzing, D., Lopez-Paz, D.

Oberwolfach Reports, 13(3):1896-1899, (Editors: A. Christmann and K. Jetter and S. Smale and D.-X. Zhou), 2016 (conference)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Bootstrat: Population Informed Bootstrapping for Rare Variant Tests

Huang, H., Peloso, G. M., Howrigan, D., Rakitsch, B., Simon-Gabriel, C. J., Goldstein, J. I., Daly, M. J., Borgwardt, K., Neale, B. M.

bioRxiv, 2016, preprint (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Movement Models Show that Postural Control Precedes and Predicts Volitional Motor Control

Rueckert, E., Camernik, J., Peters, J., Babic, J.

Nature PG: Scientific Reports, 6(Article number: 28455), 2016 (article)

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Learning Taxonomy Adaptation in Large-scale Classification

Babbar, R., Partalas, I., Gaussier, E., Amini, M., Amblard, C.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 17(98):1-37, 2016 (article)

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link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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BOiS—Berlin Object in Scene Database: Controlled Photographic Images for Visual Search Experiments with Quantified Contextual Priors

Mohr, J., Seyfarth, J., Lueschow, A., Weber, J. E., Wichmann, F. A., Obermayer, K.

Frontiers in Psychology, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Preface to the ACM TIST Special Issue on Causal Discovery and Inference

Zhang, K., Li, J., Bareinboim, E., Schölkopf, B., Pearl, J.

ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technologies, 7(2):article no. 17, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Recurrent Spiking Networks Solve Planning Tasks

Rueckert, E., Kappel, D., Tanneberg, D., Pecevski, D., Peters, J.

Nature PG: Scientific Reports, 6(Article number: 21142), 2016 (article)

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Bio-inspired feedback-circuit implementation of discrete, free energy optimizing, winner-take-all computations

Genewein, T, Braun, DA

Biological Cybernetics, 110(2):135–150, June 2016 (article)

Abstract
Bayesian inference and bounded rational decision-making require the accumulation of evidence or utility, respectively, to transform a prior belief or strategy into a posterior probability distribution over hypotheses or actions. Crucially, this process cannot be simply realized by independent integrators, since the different hypotheses and actions also compete with each other. In continuous time, this competitive integration process can be described by a special case of the replicator equation. Here we investigate simple analog electric circuits that implement the underlying differential equation under the constraint that we only permit a limited set of building blocks that we regard as biologically interpretable, such as capacitors, resistors, voltage-dependent conductances and voltage- or current-controlled current and voltage sources. The appeal of these circuits is that they intrinsically perform normalization without requiring an explicit divisive normalization. However, even in idealized simulations, we find that these circuits are very sensitive to internal noise as they accumulate error over time. We discuss in how far neural circuits could implement these operations that might provide a generic competitive principle underlying both perception and action.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Decision-Making under Ambiguity Is Modulated by Visual Framing, but Not by Motor vs. Non-Motor Context: Experiments and an Information-Theoretic Ambiguity Model

Grau-Moya, J, Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

PLoS ONE, 11(4):1-21, April 2016 (article)

Abstract
A number of recent studies have investigated differences in human choice behavior depending on task framing, especially comparing economic decision-making to choice behavior in equivalent sensorimotor tasks. Here we test whether decision-making under ambiguity exhibits effects of task framing in motor vs. non-motor context. In a first experiment, we designed an experience-based urn task with varying degrees of ambiguity and an equivalent motor task where subjects chose between hitting partially occluded targets. In a second experiment, we controlled for the different stimulus design in the two tasks by introducing an urn task with bar stimuli matching those in the motor task. We found ambiguity attitudes to be mainly influenced by stimulus design. In particular, we found that the same subjects tended to be ambiguity-preferring when choosing between ambiguous bar stimuli, but ambiguity-avoiding when choosing between ambiguous urn sample stimuli. In contrast, subjects’ choice pattern was not affected by changing from a target hitting task to a non-motor context when keeping the stimulus design unchanged. In both tasks subjects’ choice behavior was continuously modulated by the degree of ambiguity. We show that this modulation of behavior can be explained by an information-theoretic model of ambiguity that generalizes Bayes-optimal decision-making by combining Bayesian inference with robust decision-making under model uncertainty. Our results demonstrate the benefits of information-theoretic models of decision-making under varying degrees of ambiguity for a given context, but also demonstrate the sensitivity of ambiguity attitudes across contexts that theoretical models struggle to explain.

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DOI [BibTex]