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2005


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A tutorial on v-support vector machines

Chen, P., Lin, C., Schölkopf, B.

Applied Stochastic Models in Business and Industry, 21(2):111-136, 2005 (article)

Abstract
We briefly describe the main ideas of statistical learning theory, support vector machines (SVMs), and kernel feature spaces. We place particular emphasis on a description of the so-called -SVM, including details of the algorithm and its implementation, theoretical results, and practical applications. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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PDF [BibTex]

2005


PDF [BibTex]


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Robust EEG Channel Selection Across Subjects for Brain Computer Interfaces

Schröder, M., Lal, T., Hinterberger, T., Bogdan, M., Hill, J., Birbaumer, N., Rosenstiel, W., Schölkopf, B.

EURASIP Journal on Applied Signal Processing, 2005(19, Special Issue: Trends in Brain Computer Interfaces):3103-3112, (Editors: Vesin, J. M., T. Ebrahimi), 2005 (article)

Abstract
Most EEG-based Brain Computer Interface (BCI) paradigms come along with specific electrode positions, e.g.~for a visual based BCI electrode positions close to the primary visual cortex are used. For new BCI paradigms it is usually not known where task relevant activity can be measured from the scalp. For individual subjects Lal et.~al showed that recording positions can be found without the use of prior knowledge about the paradigm used. However it remains unclear to what extend their method of Recursive Channel Elimination (RCE) can be generalized across subjects. In this paper we transfer channel rankings from a group of subjects to a new subject. For motor imagery tasks the results are promising, although cross-subject channel selection does not quite achieve the performance of channel selection on data of single subjects. Although the RCE method was not provided with prior knowledge about the mental task, channels that are well known to be important (from a physiological point of view) were consistently selected whereas task-irrelevant channels were reliably disregarded.

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Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]

1997


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Comparing support vector machines with Gaussian kernels to radial basis function classifiers

Schölkopf, B., Sung, K., Burges, C., Girosi, F., Niyogi, P., Poggio, T., Vapnik, V.

IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, 45(11):2758-2765, November 1997 (article)

Abstract
The support vector (SV) machine is a novel type of learning machine, based on statistical learning theory, which contains polynomial classifiers, neural networks, and radial basis function (RBF) networks as special cases. In the RBF case, the SV algorithm automatically determines centers, weights, and threshold that minimize an upper bound on the expected test error. The present study is devoted to an experimental comparison of these machines with a classical approach, where the centers are determined by X-means clustering, and the weights are computed using error backpropagation. We consider three machines, namely, a classical RBF machine, an SV machine with Gaussian kernel, and a hybrid system with the centers determined by the SV method and the weights trained by error backpropagation. Our results show that on the United States postal service database of handwritten digits, the SV machine achieves the highest recognition accuracy, followed by the hybrid system. The SV approach is thus not only theoretically well-founded but also superior in a practical application.

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Web DOI [BibTex]

1997


Web DOI [BibTex]


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ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

Vaziri, H., MD, .., RC, .., Davison, T., YS, .., CH, .., GG, .., Benchimol, S.

The European Molecular Biology Organization Journal, 16(19):6018-6033, 1997 (article)

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Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]

1993


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Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Competition in models for the Development of Neuromuscular Connections

Rasmussen, CE., Willshaw, DJ.

Biological Cybernetics, 68, pages: 409-419, 1993 (article)

Abstract
The development of the nervous system involves in many cases interactions on a local scale rather than the execution of a fully specified genetic blueprint. The problem is to discover the nature of these interactions and the factors on which they depend. The withdrawal of polyinnervation in developing muscle is an example where such competitive interactions play an important role. We examine the possible types of competition in formal models that have plausible biological implementations. By relating the behaviour of the models to the anatomical and physiological findings we show that a model that incorporates two types of competition is superior to others. Analysis suggests that the phenomenon of intrinsic withdrawal is a side effect of the competitive mechanisms rather than a separate non-competitive feature. Full scale computer simulations have been used to confirm the capabilities of this model.

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PostScript [BibTex]

1993


PostScript [BibTex]


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Cartesian Dynamics of Simple Molecules: X Linear Quadratomics (C∞v Symmetry).

Anderson, A., Davison, T., Nagi, N., Schlueter, S.

Spectroscopy Letters, 26, pages: 509-522, 1993 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]