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2016


Stretchable, Skin-Mountable, and Wearable Strain Sensors and Their Potential Applications: A Review
Stretchable, Skin-Mountable, and Wearable Strain Sensors and Their Potential Applications: A Review

Amjadi, M., Kyung, K., Park, I., Sitti, M.

Advanced Functional Materials, 26, pages: 1678-1698, Febuary 2016 (article)

Abstract
There is a growing demand for flexible and soft electronic devices. In particular, stretchable, skin-mountable, and wearable strain sensors are needed for several potential applications including personalized health-monitoring, human motion detection, human-machine interfaces, soft robotics, and so forth. This Feature Article presents recent advancements in the development of flexible and stretchable strain sensors. The article shows that highly stretchable strain sensors are successfully being developed by new mechanisms such as disconnection between overlapped nanomaterials, crack propagation in thin films, and tunneling effect, different from traditional strain sensing mechanisms. Strain sensing performances of recently reported strain sensors are comprehensively studied and discussed, showing that appropriate choice of composite structures as well as suitable interaction between functional nanomaterials and polymers are essential for the high performance strain sensing. Next, simulation results of piezoresistivity of stretchable strain sensors by computational models are reported. Finally, potential applications of flexible strain sensors are described. This survey reveals that flexible, skin-mountable, and wearable strain sensors have potential in diverse applications while several grand challenges have to be still overcome.

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DOI [BibTex]

2016


DOI [BibTex]


Size optimization of a magnetic system for drug delivery with capsule robots
Size optimization of a magnetic system for drug delivery with capsule robots

Munoz, F., Alici, G., Li, W., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 52(5):1-11, IEEE, January 2016 (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we present a methodology for the size optimization of an external magnetic system made of arc-shaped permanent magnets (ASMs). This magnetic system is able to remotely actuate a drug-release module embedded in a prototype of a capsule robot. The optimization of the magnetic system is carried out by using an accurate analytical model that is valid for any arbitrary dimensions of the ASMs. By using this analytical model, we perform parametric studies and conduct a statistical analysis [analysis of variance (ANOVA)] to investigate efficient ways to distribute the volume of the ASMs so that the dimensions and volume of the magnetic system are minimized while optimal flux densities and magnetic torques are obtained to actuate the drug delivery system (DDS). The ANOVA results, at 5% significance level, indicate that changes in the angular width followed by changes in the length of the ASMs have the highest impact on the magnetic linkage. Furthermore, our experimental results, which are in agreement with the analytical results, show that the size optimization of the magnetic system is effective for the actuation of the DDS in capsule robots.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2005


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Geckobot and waalbot: Small-scale wall climbing robots

Unver, O., Murphy, M., Sitti, M.

In Infotech@ Aerospace, pages: 6940, 2005 (incollection)

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[BibTex]

2005


[BibTex]

2004


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E. Coli Inspired Propulsion for Swimming Microrobots

Behkam, Bahareh, Sitti, Metin

pages: 1037–1041, 2004 (article)

Abstract
Medical applications are among the most fascinating areas of microrobotics. For long, scientists have dreamed of miniature smart devices that can travel inside the human body and carry out a host of complex operations such as minimally invasive surgery (MIS), highly localized drug delivery, and screening for diseases that are in their very early stages. Still a distant dream, significant progress in micro and nanotechnology brings us closer to materializing it. For such a miniature device to be injected into the body, it has to be 800 μm or smaller in diameter. Miniature, safe and energy efficient propulsion systems hold the key to maturing this technology but they pose significant challenges. Scaling the macroscale natation mechanisms to micro/nano length scales is unfeasible. It has been estimated that a vibrating-fin driven swimming robot shorter than 6 mm can not overcome the viscous drag forces in water. In this paper, the authors propose a new type of propulsion inspired by the motility mechanism of bacteria with peritrichous flagellation, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Serratia marcescens. The perfomance of the propulsive mechanism is estimated by modeling the dynamics of the motion. The motion of the moving organelle is simulated and key parameters such as velocity, distribution of force and power requirments for different configurations of the tail are determined theoretically. In order to validate the theoretical result, a scaled up model of the swimming robot is fabricated and characterized in silicone oil using the Buckingham PI theorem for scaling. The results are compared with the theoretically computed values. These robots are intended to swim in stagnation/low velocity biofluid and reach currently inaccessible areas of the human body for disease inspection and possibly treatment. Potential target regions to use these robots include eyeball cavity, cerebrospinal fluid and the urinary system.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2004


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Atomic force microscope probe based controlled pushing for nanotribological characterization

Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME Transactions on mechatronics, 9(2):343-349, IEEE, 2004 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2003


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Synthetic gecko foot-hair micro/nano-structures as dry adhesives

Sitti, M., Fearing, R. S.

Journal of adhesion science and technology, 17(8):1055-1073, Taylor & Francis Group, 2003 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

2003


Project Page [BibTex]


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Teleoperated touch feedback from the surfaces at the nanoscale: modeling and experiments

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

IEEE/ASME transactions on mechatronics, 8(2):287-298, IEEE, 2003 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Scaled teleoperation system for nano-scale interaction and manipulation

Sitti, M., Aruk, B., Shintani, H., Hashimoto, H.

Advanced Robotics, 17(3):275-291, Taylor & Francis Group, 2003 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Atomic force microscope probe based controlled pushing for nano-tribological characterization

Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, 8(3), 2003 (article)

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[BibTex]


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Efficient charge recovery method for driving piezoelectric actuators with quasi-square waves

Campolo, D., Sitti, M., Fearing, R. S.

IEEE transactions on ultrasonics, ferroelectrics, and frequency control, 50(3):237-244, IEEE, 2003 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Piezoelectrically actuated four-bar mechanism with two flexible links for micromechanical flying insect thorax

Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME transactions on mechatronics, 8(1):26-36, IEEE, 2003 (article)

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[BibTex]