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2006


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Einer für viele: Ein Linux-PC bedient mehrere Arbeitsplätze

Renner, M., Stark, S.

c‘t, 2006(10):228-235, April 2006 (article)

Abstract
Ein moderner PC ist rechenstark genug, um mehrere Anwender gleichzeitig zu bedienen; und Linux als Multi-User-System ist von Hause aus darauf vorbereitet, mehrere gleichzeitig angemeldete Benutzer mit einem eigenen grafischen Desktop zu versorgen. Mit einem Kernelpatch und ein wenig Bastelei lassen sich an einen Linux-PC sogar mehrere unabh{\"a}ngige Monitore, Tastaturen und M{\"a}use anschließen.

ei

Web [BibTex]

2006


Web [BibTex]


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Phase noise and the classification of natural images

Wichmann, F., Braun, D., Gegenfurtner, K.

Vision Research, 46(8-9):1520-1529, April 2006 (article)

Abstract
We measured the effect of global phase manipulations on a rapid animal categorization task. The Fourier spectra of our images of natural scenes were manipulated by adding zero-mean random phase noise at all spatial frequencies. The phase noise was the independent variable, uniformly and symmetrically distributed between 0 degree and ±180 degrees. Subjects were remarkably resistant to phase noise. Even with ±120 degree phase noise subjects were still performing at 75% correct. The high resistance of the subjects’ animal categorization rate to phase noise suggests that the visual system is highly robust to such random image changes. The proportion of correct answers closely followed the correlation between original and the phase noise-distorted images. Animal detection rate was higher when the same task was performed with contrast reduced versions of the same natural images, at contrasts where the contrast reduction mimicked that resulting from our phase randomization. Since the subjects’ categorization rate was better in the contrast experiment, reduction of local contrast alone cannot explain the performance in the phase noise experiment. This result obtained with natural images differs from those obtained for simple sinusoidal stimuli were performance changes due to phase changes are attributed to local contrast changes only. Thus the global phasechange accompanying disruption of image structure such as edges and object boundaries at different spatial scales reduces object classification over and above the performance deficit resulting from reducing contrast. Additional colour information improves the categorization performance by 2 %.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Training a Support Vector Machine in the Primal

Chapelle, O.

(147), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, April 2006, The version in the "Large Scale Kernel Machines" book is more up to date. (techreport)

Abstract
Most literature on Support Vector Machines (SVMs) concentrate on the dual optimization problem. In this paper, we would like to point out that the primal problem can also be solved efficiently, both for linear and non-linear SVMs, and there is no reason for ignoring it. Moreover, from the primal point of view, new families of algorithms for large scale SVM training can be investigated.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Functional census of mutation sequence spaces: The example of p53 cancer rescue mutants

Danziger, S., Swamidass, S., Zeng, J., Dearth, L., Lu, Q., Cheng, J., Cheng, J., Hoang, V., Saigo, H., Luo, R., Baldi, P., Brachmann, R., Lathrop, R.

IEEE Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, 3(2):114-125, April 2006 (article)

Abstract
Many biomedical problems relate to mutant functional properties across a sequence space of interest, e.g., flu, cancer, and HIV. Detailed knowledge of mutant properties and function improves medical treatment and prevention. A functional census of p53 cancer rescue mutants would aid the search for cancer treatments from p53 mutant rescue. We devised a general methodology for conducting a functional census of a mutation sequence space by choosing informative mutants early. The methodology was tested in a double-blind predictive test on the functional rescue property of 71 novel putative p53 cancer rescue mutants iteratively predicted in sets of three (24 iterations). The first double-blind 15-point moving accuracy was 47 percent and the last was 86 percent; r = 0.01 before an epiphanic 16th iteration and r = 0.92 afterward. Useful mutants were chosen early (overall r = 0.80). Code and data are freely available (http://www.igb.uci.edu/research/research.html, corresponding authors: R.H.L. for computation and R.K.B. for biology).

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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A Direct Method for Building Sparse Kernel Learning Algorithms

Wu, M., Schölkopf, B., BakIr, G.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 7, pages: 603-624, April 2006 (article)

Abstract
Many Kernel Learning Algorithms(KLA), including Support Vector Machine (SVM), result in a Kernel Machine (KM), such as a kernel classifier, whose key component is a weight vector in a feature space implicitly introduced by a positive definite kernel function. This weight vector is usually obtained by solving a convex optimization problem. Based on this fact we present a direct method to build Sparse Kernel Learning Algorithms (SKLA) by adding one more constraint to the original convex optimization problem, such that the sparseness of the resulting KM is explicitly controlled while at the same time the performance of the resulting KM can be kept as high as possible. A gradient based approach is provided to solve this modified optimization problem. Applying this method to the SVM results in a concrete algorithm for building Sparse Large Margin Classifiers (SLMC). Further analysis of the SLMC algorithm indicates that it essentially finds a discriminating subspace that can be spanned by a small number of vectors, and in this subspace, the different classes of data are linearly well separated. Experimental results over several classification benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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An Inventory of Sequence Polymorphisms For Arabidopsis

Clark, R., Ossowski, S., Schweikert, G., Rätsch, G., Shinn, P., Zeller, G., Warthmann, N., Fu, G., Hinds, D., Chen, H., Frazer, K., Huson, D., Schölkopf, B., Nordborg, M., Ecker, J., Weigel, D.

17th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, April 2006 (talk)

Abstract
We have used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to characterize common sequence variation in 20 wild strains of Arabidopsis thaliana that were chosen for maximal genetic diversity. Both strands of each possible SNP of the 119 Mb reference genome were represented on the arrays, which were hybridized with whole genome, isothermally amplified DNA to minimize ascertainment biases. Using two complementary approaches, a model based algorithm, and a newly developed machine learning method, we identified over 550,000 SNPs with a false discovery rate of ~ 0.03 (average of 1 SNP for every 216 bp of the genome). A heuristic algorithm predicted in addition ~700 highly polymorphic or deleted regions per accession. Over 700 predicted polymorphisms with major functional effects (e.g., premature stop codons, or deletions of coding sequence) were validated by dideoxy sequencing. Using this data set, we provide the first systematic description of the types of genes that harbor major effect polymorphisms in natural populations at moderate allele frequencies. The data also provide an unprecedented resource for the study of genetic variation in an experimentally tractable, multicellular model organism.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Machine Learning and Applications in Biology

Shin, H.

6th Course in Bioinformatics for Molecular Biologist, March 2006 (talk)

Abstract
The emergence of the fields of computational biology and bioinformatics has alleviated the burden of solving many biological problems, saving the time and cost required for experiments and also providing predictions that guide new experiments. Within computational biology, machine learning algorithms have played a central role in dealing with the flood of biological data. The goal of this tutorial is to raise awareness and comprehension of machine learning so that biologists can properly match the task at hand to the corresponding analytical approach. We start by categorizing biological problem settings and introduce the general machine learning schemes that fit best to each or these categories. We then explore representative models in further detail, from traditional statistical models to recent kernel models, presenting several up-to-date research projects in bioinfomatics to exemplify how biological questions can benefit from a machine learning approach. Finally, we discuss how cooperation between biologists and machine learners might be made smoother.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Kernel extrapolation

Vishwanathan, SVN., Borgwardt, KM., Guttman, O., Smola, AJ.

Neurocomputing, 69(7-9):721-729, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We present a framework for efficient extrapolation of reduced rank approximations, graph kernels, and locally linear embeddings (LLE) to unseen data. We also present a principled method to combine many of these kernels and then extrapolate them. Central to our method is a theorem for matrix approximation, and an extension of the representer theorem to handle multiple joint regularization constraints. Experiments in protein classification demonstrate the feasibility of our approach.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Statistical Properties of Kernel Principal Component Analysis

Blanchard, G., Bousquet, O., Zwald, L.

Machine Learning, 66(2-3):259-294, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We study the properties of the eigenvalues of Gram matrices in a non-asymptotic setting. Using local Rademacher averages, we provide data-dependent and tight bounds for their convergence towards eigenvalues of the corresponding kernel operator. We perform these computations in a functional analytic framework which allows to deal implicitly with reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces of infinite dimension. This can have applications to various kernel algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines (SVM). We focus on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and, using such techniques, we obtain sharp excess risk bounds for the reconstruction error. In these bounds, the dependence on the decay of the spectrum and on the closeness of successive eigenvalues is made explicit.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Network-based de-noising improves prediction from microarray data

Kato, T., Murata, Y., Miura, K., Asai, K., Horton, P., Tsuda, K., Fujibuchi, W.

BMC Bioinformatics, 7(Suppl. 1):S4-S4, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
Prediction of human cell response to anti-cancer drugs (compounds) from microarray data is a challenging problem, due to the noise properties of microarrays as well as the high variance of living cell responses to drugs. Hence there is a strong need for more practical and robust methods than standard methods for real-value prediction. We devised an extended version of the off-subspace noise-reduction (de-noising) method to incorporate heterogeneous network data such as sequence similarity or protein-protein interactions into a single framework. Using that method, we first de-noise the gene expression data for training and test data and also the drug-response data for training data. Then we predict the unknown responses of each drug from the de-noised input data. For ascertaining whether de-noising improves prediction or not, we carry out 12-fold cross-validation for assessment of the prediction performance. We use the Pearson‘s correlation coefficient between the true and predicted respon se values as the prediction performance. De-noising improves the prediction performance for 65% of drugs. Furthermore, we found that this noise reduction method is robust and effective even when a large amount of artificial noise is added to the input data. We found that our extended off-subspace noise-reduction method combining heterogeneous biological data is successful and quite useful to improve prediction of human cell cancer drug responses from microarray data.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Data mining problems and solutions for response modeling in CRM

Cho, S., Shin, H., Yu, E., Ha, K., MacLachlan, D.

Entrue Journal of Information Technology, 5(1):55-64, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We present three data mining problems that are often encountered in building a response model. They are robust modeling, variable selection and data selection. Respective algorithmic solutions are given. They are bagging based ensemble, genetic algorithm based wrapper approach and nearest neighbor-based data selection in that order. A real world data set from Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, or DMEF4, is used to show their effectiveness. Proposed methods were found to solve the problems in a practical way.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Improving Contact Realism Through Event-Based Haptic Feedback

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Fiene, J. P., Niemeyer, G.

IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 12(2):219-230, March 2006 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Model-based Design Analysis and Yield Optimization

Pfingsten, T., Herrmann, D., Rasmussen, C.

IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing, 19(4):475-486, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
Fluctuations are inherent to any fabrication process. Integrated circuits and micro-electro-mechanical systems are particularly affected by these variations, and due to high quality requirements the effect on the devices’ performance has to be understood quantitatively. In recent years it has become possible to model the performance of such complex systems on the basis of design specifications, and model-based Sensitivity Analysis has made its way into industrial engineering. We show how an efficient Bayesian approach, using a Gaussian process prior, can replace the commonly used brute-force Monte Carlo scheme, making it possible to apply the analysis to computationally costly models. We introduce a number of global, statistically justified sensitivity measures for design analysis and optimization. Two models of integrated systems serve us as case studies to introduce the analysis and to assess its convergence properties. We show that the Bayesian Monte Carlo scheme can save costly simulation runs and can ensure a reliable accuracy of the analysis.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Prenatal development of ocular dominance and orientation maps in a self-organizing model of V1

Jegelka, S., Bednar, J., Miikkulainen, R.

Neurocomputing, 69(10-12):1291-1296, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
How orientation and ocular-dominance (OD) maps develop before visual experience begins is controversial. Possible influences include molecular signals and spontaneous activity, but their contributions remain unclear. This paper presents LISSOM simulations suggesting that previsual spontaneous activity alone is sufficient for realistic OR and OD maps to develop. Individual maps develop robustly with various previsual patterns, and are aided by background noise. However, joint OR/OD maps depend crucially on how correlated the patterns are between eyes, even over brief initial periods. Therefore, future biological experiments should account for multiple activity sources, and should measure map interactions rather than maps of single features.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Weighting of experimental evidence in macromolecular structure determination

Habeck, M., Rieping, W., Nilges, M.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(6):1756-1761, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
The determination of macromolecular structures requires weighting of experimental evidence relative to prior physical information. Although it can critically affect the quality of the calculated structures, experimental data are routinely weighted on an empirical basis. At present, cross-validation is the most rigorous method to determine the best weight. We describe a general method to adaptively weight experimental data in the course of structure calculation. It is further shown that the necessity to define weights for the data can be completely alleviated. We demonstrate the method on a structure calculation from NMR data and find that the resulting structures are optimal in terms of accuracy and structural quality. Our method is devoid of the bias imposed by an empirical choice of the weight and has some advantages over estimating the weight by cross-validation.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Cross-Validation Optimization for Structured Hessian Kernel Methods

Seeger, M., Chapelle, O.

Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, February 2006 (techreport)

Abstract
We address the problem of learning hyperparameters in kernel methods for which the Hessian of the objective is structured. We propose an approximation to the cross-validation log likelihood whose gradient can be computed analytically, solving the hyperparameter learning problem efficiently through nonlinear optimization. Crucially, our learning method is based entirely on matrix-vector multiplication primitives with the kernel matrices and their derivatives, allowing straightforward specialization to new kernels or to large datasets. When applied to the problem of multi-way classification, our method scales linearly in the number of classes and gives rise to state-of-the-art results on a remote imaging task.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Subspace identification through blind source separation

Grosse-Wentrup, M., Buss, M.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 13(2):100-103, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
Given a linear and instantaneous mixture model, we prove that for blind source separation (BSS) algorithms based on mutual information, only sources with non-Gaussian distribution are consistently reconstructed independent of initial conditions. This allows the identification of non-Gaussian sources and consequently the identification of signal and noise subspaces through BSS. The results are illustrated with a simple example, and the implications for a variety of signal processing applications, such as denoising and model identification, are discussed.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Classification of Faces in Man and Machine

Graf, A., Wichmann, F., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Computation, 18(1):143-165, January 2006 (article)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Dimension Reduction as a Deflation Method in ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 13(1):45-48, 2006 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Apparatus for Inspecting Alignment Film of Liquid Crystal Display and Method Thereof

Park, MW., Son, HI., Kim, SJ., Kim, KI., Yang, JW.

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Biologische Kybernetik, 2006 (patent)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Symbol Recognition with Kernel Density Matching

Zhang, W., Wenyin, L., Zhang, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 28(12):2020-2024, 2006 (article)

Abstract
We propose a novel approach to similarity assessment for graphic symbols. Symbols are represented as 2D kernel densities and their similarity is measured by the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Symbol orientation is found by gradient-based angle searching or independent component analysis. Experimental results show the outstanding performance of this approach in various situations.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Apparatus for Inspecting Flat Panel Display and Method Thereof

Yang, JW., Kim, KI., Son, HI.

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Biologische Kybernetik, 2006 (patent)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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An adaptive method for subband decomposition ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

Neural Computation, 18(1):191-223, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Subband decomposition ICA (SDICA), an extension of ICA, assumes that each source is represented as the sum of some independent subcomponents and dependent subcomponents, which have different frequency bands. In this article, we first investigate the feasibility of separating the SDICA mixture in an adaptive manner. Second, we develop an adaptive method for SDICA, namely band-selective ICA (BS-ICA), which finds the mixing matrix and the estimate of the source independent subcomponents. This method is based on the minimization of the mutual information between outputs. Some practical issues are discussed. For better applicability, a scheme to avoid the high-dimensional score function difference is given. Third, we investigate one form of the overcomplete ICA problems with sources having specific frequency characteristics, which BS-ICA can also be used to solve. Experimental results illustrate the success of the proposed method for solving both SDICA and the over-complete ICA problems.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Chiral molecules split light: Reflection and refraction in a chiral liquid

Ghosh, A., Fischer, P.

PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, 97(17), 2006, Featured highlight ‘Fundamental optical physics: Refraction’ Nature Photonics, Nov. 2006. (article)

Abstract
A light beam changes direction as it enters a liquid at an angle from another medium, such as air. Should the liquid contain molecules that lack mirror symmetry, then it has been predicted by Fresnel that the light beam will not only change direction, but will actually split into two separate beams with a small difference in the respective angles of refraction. Here we report the observation of this phenomenon. We also demonstrate that the angle of reflection does not equal the angle of incidence in a chiral medium. Unlike conventional optical rotation, which depends on the path-length through the sample, the reported reflection and refraction phenomena arise within a few wavelengths at the interface and thereby suggest a new approach to polarimetry that can be used in microfluidic volumes.

Featured highlight ‘Fundamental optical physics: Refraction’ Nature Photonics, Nov. 2006.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Passive compliance for a RC servo-controlled bouncing robot

Meyer, F., Spröwitz, A., Berthouze, L.

Advanced Robotics, 20(8):953-961, 2006 (article)

Abstract
A novel and low-cost passively compliant mechanism is described that can be used with RC servos to actuate legged robots in tasks involving high dynamic loads such as bouncing. Compliance is achieved by combining visco-elastic material and metal parts. Joint response to dynamic loads is evaluated using real-world experiments and force data are obtained from a Lagrangian analysis of the system. The experimental results demonstrate the applicative potential of this mechanism.

dlg

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Direct chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy

Buckingham, A., Fischer, P.

CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 324(1):111-116, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is unable to distinguish between the two mirror-image forms (enantiomers) of a chiral molecule. This is because the NMR spectrum is determined by the chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants which - in the absence of a chiral solvent - are identical for the two enantiomers. We discuss how chirality may nevertheless be directly detected in liquid-state NMR spectroscopy: In a chiral molecule, the rotating nuclear magnetic moment induces an electric dipole moment in the direction perpendicular to itself and to the permanent magnetic field of the spectrometer. We present computations of the precessing electric polarization following a pi/2 pulse. Our estimates indicate that the electric polarization should be detectable in favourable cases. We also predict that application of an electrostatic field induces a chirally sensitive magnetization oscillating in the direction of the permanent magnetic field. We show that the electric-field-perturbed chemical shift tensor, the nuclear magnetic shielding polarizability, underlies these chiral NMR effects. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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An ultrasonic standing-wave-actuated nano-positioning walking robot: piezoelectric-metal composite beam modeling

Son, K. J., Kartik, V., Wickert, J. A., Sitti, M.

Journal of vibration and control, 12(12):1293-1309, Sage Publications, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Ring-resonator-based frequency-domain optical activity measurements of a chiral liquid

Vollmer, F., Fischer, P.

OPTICS LETTERS, 31(4):453-455, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Chiral liquids rotate the plane of polarization of linearly polarized light and are therefore optically active. Here we show that optical rotation can be observed in the frequency domain. A chiral liquid introduced in a fiber-loop ring resonator that supports left and right circularly polarized modes gives rise to relative frequency shifts that are a direct measure of the liquid's circular birefringence and hence of its optical activity. The effect is in principle not diminished if the circumference of the ring is reduced. The technique is similarly applicable to refractive index and linear birefringence measurements. (c) 2006 Optical Society of America.

pf

DOI [BibTex]


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Sign of the refractive index in a gain medium with negative permittivity and permeability

Chen, Y., Fischer, P., Wise, F.

JOURNAL OF THE OPTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA B-OPTICAL PHYSICS, 23(1):45-50, 2006 (article)

Abstract
We show how the sign of the refractive index in any medium may be derived using a rigorous analysis based on Einstein causality. In particular, we consider left-handed materials, i.e., media that have negative permittivities and permeabilities at the frequency of interest. We find that the consideration of gain in such media can give rise to a positive refractive index. (c) 2006 Optical Society of America.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Implicit Wiener Series, Part II: Regularised estimation

Gehler, P., Franz, M.

(148), Max Planck Institute, 2006 (techreport)

ei ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS

VOLZ, RICHARD A, TARN, TJ, MACIEJEWSKI, ANTHONY A, LEE, SUKHAN, BICCHI, ANTONIO, DE LUCA, ALESSANDRO, LUH, PETER B, TAYLOR, RUSSELL H, BEKEY, GEORGE A, ARAI, HIROHIKO, others

2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design methodology for biomimetic propulsion of miniature swimming robots

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

Trans.-ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems Measurement and Control, 128(1):36, ASME, 2006 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Augmented reality user interface for an atomic force microscope-based nanorobotic system

Vogl, W., Ma, B. K., Sitti, M.

IEEE transactions on nanotechnology, 5(4):397-406, IEEE, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Friction enhancement via micro-patterned wet elastomer adhesives on small intestinal surfaces

Kwon, J., Cheung, E., Park, S., Sitti, M.

Biomedical Materials, 1(4):216, IOP Publishing, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Statistical Learning of LQG controllers

Theodorou, E.

Technical Report-2006-1, Computational Action and Vision Lab University of Minnesota, 2006, clmc (techreport)

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Influence of the substrate on the magnetic anisotropy of monatomic wires

Komelj, M., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 73, 2006 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes based on higher order Cauchy-Born rule

Guo, X., Wang, J. B., Zhang, H. W.

{International Journal of Solids and Structures}, 43, pages: 1276-1290, 2006 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Vanishing Fe 3d orbital moments in single-crystalline magnetite

Goering, E., Gold, S., Lafkioti, M., Schütz, G.

{Europhysics Letters}, 73(1):97-103, 2006 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enhancement of L10 phase formation in FePt nanoparticles by nitrogenization

Dmitrieva, O., Acet, M., Dumpich, G., Kästner, J., Antoniak, C., Farle, M., Fauth, K.

{Journal of Physics D}, 39, pages: 4741-4745, 2006 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structure of historical brass tonques and shallots from baroque organs

Baretzky, B., Friesel, M., Petelin, A., Mazilkin, A., Straumal, B.

{Defect and Diffusion Forum}, 249, pages: 275-280, 2006 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Three-dimensional modeling of mechanical forces in the extra-cellular matrix during epithelial lumen formation

Zeng, D., Ferrari, A., Ulmer, J., Veligodskiy, A., Fischer, P., Spatz, J. P., Ventikos, Y., Poulikakos, D., Kroschewski, R.

{Biophysical Journal}, 90(12):4380-4391, 2006 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Compliant and low-cost humidity nanosensors using nanoporous polymer membranes

Yang, B., Aksak, B., Lin, Q., Sitti, M.

Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 114(1):254-262, Elsevier, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Task-based and stable telenanomanipulation in a nanoscale virtual environment

Kim, S., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on automation science and engineering, 3(3):240-247, IEEE, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Drawing suspended polymer micro-/nanofibers using glass micropipettes

Nain, A. S., Wong, J. C., Amon, C., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 89(18):183105, AIP, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dynamic Hebbian learning in adaptive frequency oscillators

Righetti, L., Buchli, J., Ijspeert, A.

Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, 216(2):269-281, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Nonlinear oscillators are widely used in biology, physics and engineering for modeling and control. They are interesting because of their synchronization properties when coupled to other dynamical systems. In this paper, we propose a learning rule for oscillators which adapts their frequency to the frequency of any periodic or pseudo-periodic input signal. Learning is done in a dynamic way: it is part of the dynamical system and not an offline process. An interesting property of our model is that it is easily generalizable to a large class of oscillators, from phase oscillators to relaxation oscillators and strange attractors with a generic learning rule. One major feature of our learning rule is that the oscillators constructed can adapt their frequency without any signal processing or the need to specify a time window or similar free parameters. All the processing is embedded in the dynamics of the adaptive oscillator. The convergence of the learning is proved for the Hopf oscillator, then numerical experiments are carried out to explore the learning capabilities of the system. Finally, we generalize the learning rule to non-harmonic oscillators like relaxation oscillators and strange attractors.

mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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HumanEva: Synchronized video and motion capture dataset for evaluation of articulated human motion

Sigal, L., Black, M. J.

(CS-06-08), Brown University, Department of Computer Science, 2006 (techreport)

ps

pdf abstract [BibTex]

pdf abstract [BibTex]


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Bayesian population decoding of motor cortical activity using a Kalman filter

Wu, W., Gao, Y., Bienenstock, E., Donoghue, J. P., Black, M. J.

Neural Computation, 18(1):80-118, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Effective neural motor prostheses require a method for decoding neural activity representing desired movement. In particular, the accurate reconstruction of a continuous motion signal is necessary for the control of devices such as computer cursors, robots, or a patient's own paralyzed limbs. For such applications, we developed a real-time system that uses Bayesian inference techniques to estimate hand motion from the firing rates of multiple neurons. In this study, we used recordings that were previously made in the arm area of primary motor cortex in awake behaving monkeys using a chronically implanted multielectrode microarray. Bayesian inference involves computing the posterior probability of the hand motion conditioned on a sequence of observed firing rates; this is formulated in terms of the product of a likelihood and a prior. The likelihood term models the probability of firing rates given a particular hand motion. We found that a linear gaussian model could be used to approximate this likelihood and could be readily learned from a small amount of training data. The prior term defines a probabilistic model of hand kinematics and was also taken to be a linear gaussian model. Decoding was performed using a Kalman filter, which gives an efficient recursive method for Bayesian inference when the likelihood and prior are linear and gaussian. In off-line experiments, the Kalman filter reconstructions of hand trajectory were more accurate than previously reported results. The resulting decoding algorithm provides a principled probabilistic model of motor-cortical coding, decodes hand motion in real time, provides an estimate of uncertainty, and is straightforward to implement. Additionally the formulation unifies and extends previous models of neural coding while providing insights into the motor-cortical code.

ps

pdf preprint pdf from publisher abstract [BibTex]

pdf preprint pdf from publisher abstract [BibTex]


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Theoretical justification of ground-state moment analysis of magnetic dichroic x-ray absorption spectra for 3d transition metals

Dörfler, F., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 74, 2006 (article)

Abstract
{(6 pages)}

mms

[BibTex]