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2009


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Adhesion of biologically inspired polymer microfibers on soft surfaces

Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6613-6616, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

2009


[BibTex]


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Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives

Sitti, M., Cusick, B., Aksak, B., Nese, A., Lee, H., Dong, H., Kowalewski, T., Matyjaszewski, K.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(10):2277-2287, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Sensor-Based Learning Algorithm for the Self-Organization of Robot Behavior

Hesse, F., Martius, G., Der, R., Herrmann, J. M.

Algorithms, 2(1):398-409, 2009 (article)

Abstract
Ideally, sensory information forms the only source of information to a robot. We consider an algorithm for the self-organization of a controller. At short timescales the controller is merely reactive but the parameter dynamics and the acquisition of knowledge by an internal model lead to seemingly purposeful behavior on longer timescales. As a paradigmatic example, we study the simulation of an underactuated snake-like robot. By interacting with the real physical system formed by the robotic hardware and the environment, the controller achieves a sensitive and body-specific actuation of the robot.

al

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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A Curvature-Based Approach for Left Ventricular Shape Analysis from Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Si Yong Yeo, Liang Zhong, Yi Su, Ru San Tan, Dhanjoo Ghista

Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing, 47(3):313-322, 2009 (article)

Abstract
It is believed that left ventricular (LV) regional shape is indicative of LV regional function, and cardiac pathologies are often associated with regional alterations in ventricular shape. In this article, we present a set of procedures for evaluating regional LV surface shape from anatomically accurate models reconstructed from cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. LV surface curvatures are computed using local surface fitting method, which enables us to assess regional LV shape and its variation. Comparisons are made between normal and diseased hearts. It is illustrated that LV surface curvatures at different regions of the normal heart are higher than those of the diseased heart. Also, the normal heart experiences a larger change in regional curvedness during contraction than the diseased heart. It is believed that with a wide range of dataset being evaluated, this approach will provide a new and efficient way of quantifying LV regional function.

ps

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Magnetism of FePt surface alloys

Honolka, J., Lee, T. Y., Kuhnke, K., Enders, A., Skomski, R., Bornemann, S., Mankovsky, S., Minár, J., Staunton, J., Ebert, H., Hessler, M., Fauth, K., Schütz, G., Buchsbaum, A., Schmid, M., Varga, P., Kern, K.

{Physical Review Letters}, 102(6), 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Enhanced 95Zr diffusion in grain boundaries of nano-crystalline ZrO2 \mbox⋅ 9.5 mol\textpercent Y2O3

Drings, H., Brossmann, U., Carstanjen, H. D., Szökefalvi-Nagy, A., Noll, C., Schaefer, H.-E.

{Physica Status Solidi (A)}, 206(1):54-58, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetism of nanostructured materials for advanced magnetic recording

Goll, D.

{International Journal of Materials Research}, 100, pages: 652-662, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Vortex core switching by coherent excitation with single in-plane magnetic field pulses

Weigand, M., van Waeyenberge, B., Vansteenkiste, A., Curcic, M., Sackmann, V., Stoll, H., Tyliszczak, T., Kaznatcheev, K., Bertwistle, D., Woltersdorf, G., Back, C. H., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review Letters}, 102, 2009 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Increase of Mn solubility with decreasing grain size in ZnO

Straumal, B., Baretzky, B., Mazilkin, A., Protasova, S., Myatiev, A., Straumal, P.

{Journal of the European Ceramic Society}, 29(10):1963-1970, 2009 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Fe-C nanograined alloys obtained by high-pressure torsion: Structure and magnetic properties

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Dobatkin, S. V., Rodin, A. O., Baretzky, B., Goll, D., Schütz, G.

{Materials Science and Engineering A}, 503, pages: 185-189, 2009 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Chiral symmetry breaking of magnetic vortices by sample roughness

Vansteenkiste, A., Weigand, M., Curcic, M., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Van Waeyenberge, B.

{New Journal of Physics}, 11, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Extended s-d model for magnetization dynamics of strongly noncollinear configurations

De Angeli, L., Steiauf, D., Singer, R., Köberle, I., Dietermann, F., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Incorporating Muscle Activation-Contraction dynamics to an optimal control framework for finger movements

Theodorou, Evangelos A., Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2009), 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Recent experimental and theoretical work [1] investigated the neural control of contact transition between motion and force during tapping with the index finger as a nonlinear optimization problem. Such transitions from motion to well-directed contact force are a fundamental part of dexterous manipulation. There are 3 alternative hypotheses of how this transition could be accomplished by the nervous system as a function of changes in direction and magnitude of the torque vector controlling the finger. These hypotheses are 1) an initial change in direction with a subsequent change in magnitude of the torque vector; 2) an initial change in magnitude with a subsequent directional change of the torque vector; and 3) a simultaneous and proportionally equal change of both direction and magnitude of the torque vector. Experimental work in [2] shows that the nervous system selects the first strategy, and in [1] we suggest that this may in fact be the optimal strategy. In [4] the framework of Iterative Linear Quadratic Optimal Regulator (ILQR) was extended to incorporate motion and force control. However, our prior simulation work assumed direct and instantaneous control of joint torques, which ignores the known delays and filtering properties of skeletal muscle. In this study, we implement an ILQR controller for a more biologically plausible biomechanical model of the index finger than [4], and add activation-contraction dynamics to the system to simulate muscle function. The planar biomechanical model includes the kinematics of the 3 joints while the applied torques are driven by activation?contraction dynamics with biologically plausible time constants [3]. In agreement with our experimental work [2], the task is to, within 500 ms, move the finger from a given resting configuration to target configuration with a desired terminal velocity. ILQR does not only stabilize the finger dynamics according to the objective function, but it also generates smooth joint space trajectories with minimal tuning and without an a-priori initial control policy (which is difficult to find for highly dimensional biomechanical systems). Furthemore, the use of this optimal control framework and the addition of activation-contraction dynamics considers the full nonlinear dynamics of the index finger and produces a sequence of postures which are compatible with experimental motion data [2]. These simulations combined with prior experimental results suggest that optimal control is a strong candidate for the generation of finger movements prior to abrupt motion-to-force transitions. This work is funded in part by grants NIH R01 0505520 and NSF EFRI-0836042 to Dr. Francisco J. Valero- Cuevas 1 Venkadesan M, Valero-Cuevas FJ. 
Effects of neuromuscular lags on controlling contact transitions. 
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: 2008. 2 Venkadesan M, Valero-Cuevas FJ. 
Neural Control of Motion-to-Force Transitions with the Fingertip. 
J. Neurosci., Feb 2008; 28: 1366 - 1373; 3 Zajac. Muscle and tendon: properties, models, scaling, and application to biomechanics and motor control. Crit Rev Biomed Eng, 17 4. Weiwei Li., Francisco Valero Cuevas: ?Linear Quadratic Optimal Control of Contact Transition with Fingertip ? ACC 2009

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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On-line learning and modulation of periodic movements with nonlinear dynamical systems

Gams, A., Ijspeert, A., Schaal, S., Lenarčič, J.

Autonomous Robots, 27(1):3-23, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Abstract  The paper presents a two-layered system for (1) learning and encoding a periodic signal without any knowledge on its frequency and waveform, and (2) modulating the learned periodic trajectory in response to external events. The system is used to learn periodic tasks on a humanoid HOAP-2 robot. The first layer of the system is a dynamical system responsible for extracting the fundamental frequency of the input signal, based on adaptive frequency oscillators. The second layer is a dynamical system responsible for learning of the waveform based on a built-in learning algorithm. By combining the two dynamical systems into one system we can rapidly teach new trajectories to robots without any knowledge of the frequency of the demonstration signal. The system extracts and learns only one period of the demonstration signal. Furthermore, the trajectories are robust to perturbations and can be modulated to cope with a dynamic environment. The system is computationally inexpensive, works on-line for any periodic signal, requires no additional signal processing to determine the frequency of the input signal and can be applied in parallel to multiple dimensions. Additionally, it can adapt to changes in frequency and shape, e.g. to non-stationary signals, such as hand-generated signals and human demonstrations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Reversible dry micro-fibrillar adhesives with thermally controllable adhesion

Kim, S., Sitti, M., Xie, T., Xiao, X.

Soft Matter, 5(19):3689-3693, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Enhanced reversible adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide-coated elastomer microfibrillar structures under wet conditions

Glass, P., Chung, H., Washburn, N. R., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6607-6612, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Superconducting phase formation in random neck syntheses: a study of the Y-Ba-Cu-O system by magneto-optics and magnetometry

Willems, J. B., Albrecht, J., Landau, I. L., Hulliger, J.

{Superconductor Science and Technology}, 22, 2009 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Determination of spin moments from magnetic EXAFS

Popescu, V., Gü\ssmann, M., Fähnle, M., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Linewidth of ferromagnetic resonance for systems with anisotropic damping

Seib, J., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structural and magnetic deconvolution of FePt/FeOx-nanoparticles using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

Nolle, D., Goering, E., Tietze, T., Schütz, G., Figuerola, A., Manna, L.

{New Journal of Physics}, 11, 2009 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic imaging with femtosecond temporal resolution

Li, J., Lee, M.-S., He, W., Redeker, B., Remhof, A., Amaladass, E., Hassel, C., Eimüller, T.

{Review of Scientific Instruments}, 80(7), 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Elliott-Yafet mechanism and the discussion of femtosecond magnetization dynamics

Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Investigation of the stability of Mn12 single molecule magnets

Voss, S., Fonin, M., Burova, L., Burgert, M., Dedkov, Y. S., Preobrajenski, A. B., Goering, E., Groth, U., Kaul, A. R., Ruediger, U.

{Applied Physics A}, 94(3):491-495, 2009 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2001


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Perception of Planar Shapes in Depth

Wichmann, F., Willems, B., Rosas, P., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 1(3):176, First Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), December 2001 (poster)

Abstract
We investigated the influence of the perceived 3D-orientation of planar elliptical shapes on the perception of the shapes themselves. Ellipses were projected onto the surface of a sphere and subjects were asked to indicate if the projected shapes looked as if they were a circle on the surface of the sphere. The image of the sphere was obtained from a real, (near) perfect sphere using a highly accurate digital camera (real sphere diameter 40 cm; camera-to-sphere distance 320 cm; for details see Willems et al., Perception 29, S96, 2000; Photometrics SenSys 400 digital camera with Rodenstock lens, 12-bit linear luminance resolution). Stimuli were presented monocularly on a carefully linearized Sony GDM-F500 monitor keeping the scene geometry as in the real case (sphere diameter on screen 8.2 cm; viewing distance 66 cm). Experiments were run in a darkened room using a viewing tube to minimize, as far as possible, extraneous monocular cues to depth. Three different methods were used to obtain subjects' estimates of 3D-shape: the method of adjustment, temporal 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) and yes/no. Several results are noteworthy. First, mismatch between perceived and objective slant tended to decrease with increasing objective slant. Second, the variability of the settings, too, decreased with increasing objective slant. Finally, we comment on the results obtained using different psychophysical methods and compare our results to those obtained using a real sphere and binocular vision (Willems et al.).

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2001


Web DOI [BibTex]


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Anabolic and Catabolic Gene Expression Pattern Analysis in Normal Versus Osteoarthritic Cartilage Using Complementary DNA-Array Technology

Aigner, T., Zien, A., Gehrsitz, A., Gebhard, P., McKenna, L.

Arthritis and Rheumatism, 44(12):2777-2789, December 2001 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Generalization performance of regularization networks and support vector machines via entropy numbers of compact operators

Williamson, R., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 47(6):2516-2532, September 2001 (article)

Abstract
We derive new bounds for the generalization error of kernel machines, such as support vector machines and related regularization networks by obtaining new bounds on their covering numbers. The proofs make use of a viewpoint that is apparently novel in the field of statistical learning theory. The hypothesis class is described in terms of a linear operator mapping from a possibly infinite-dimensional unit ball in feature space into a finite-dimensional space. The covering numbers of the class are then determined via the entropy numbers of the operator. These numbers, which characterize the degree of compactness of the operator can be bounded in terms of the eigenvalues of an integral operator induced by the kernel function used by the machine. As a consequence, we are able to theoretically explain the effect of the choice of kernel function on the generalization performance of support vector machines.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Centralization: A new method for the normalization of gene expression data

Zien, A., Aigner, T., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, 17, pages: S323-S331, June 2001, Mathematical supplement available at http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/574280.html (article)

Abstract
Microarrays measure values that are approximately proportional to the numbers of copies of different mRNA molecules in samples. Due to technical difficulties, the constant of proportionality between the measured intensities and the numbers of mRNA copies per cell is unknown and may vary for different arrays. Usually, the data are normalized (i.e., array-wise multiplied by appropriate factors) in order to compensate for this effect and to enable informative comparisons between different experiments. Centralization is a new two-step method for the computation of such normalization factors that is both biologically better motivated and more robust than standard approaches. First, for each pair of arrays the quotient of the constants of proportionality is estimated. Second, from the resulting matrix of pairwise quotients an optimally consistent scaling of the samples is computed.

ei

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Regularized principal manifolds

Smola, A., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 1, pages: 179-209, June 2001 (article)

Abstract
Many settings of unsupervised learning can be viewed as quantization problems - the minimization of the expected quantization error subject to some restrictions. This allows the use of tools such as regularization from the theory of (supervised) risk minimization for unsupervised learning. This setting turns out to be closely related to principal curves, the generative topographic map, and robust coding. We explore this connection in two ways: (1) we propose an algorithm for finding principal manifolds that can be regularized in a variety of ways; and (2) we derive uniform convergence bounds and hence bounds on the learning rates of the algorithm. In particular, we give bounds on the covering numbers which allows us to obtain nearly optimal learning rates for certain types of regularization operators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the approach.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Failure Diagnosis of Discrete Event Systems

Son, HI., Kim, KW., Lee, S.

Journal of Control, Automation and Systems Engineering, 7(5):375-383, May 2001, In Korean (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Plaid maskers revisited: asymmetric plaids

Wichmann, F.

pages: 57, 4. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), March 2001 (poster)

Abstract
A large number of psychophysical and physiological experiments suggest that luminance patterns are independently analysed in channels responding to different bands of spatial frequency. There are, however, interactions among stimuli falling well outside the usual estimates of channels' bandwidths. Derrington & Henning (1989) first reported that, in 2-AFC sinusoidal-grating detection, plaid maskers, whose components are oriented symmetrically about the signal orientation, cause a substantially larger threshold elevation than would be predicted from their sinusoidal constituents alone. Wichmann & Tollin (1997a,b) and Wichmann & Henning (1998) confirmed and extended the original findings, measuring masking as a function of presentation time and plaid mask contrast. Here I investigate masking using plaid patterns whose components are asymmetrically positioned about the signal orientation. Standard temporal 2-AFC pattern discrimination experiments were conducted using plaid patterns and oblique sinusoidal gratings as maskers, and horizontally orientated sinusoidal gratings as signals. Signal and maskers were always interleaved on the display (refresh rate 152 Hz). As in the case of the symmetrical plaid maskers, substantial masking was observed for many of the asymmetrical plaids. Masking is neither a straightforward function of the plaid's constituent sinusoidal components nor of the periodicity of the luminance beats between components. These results cause problems for the notion that, even for simple stimuli, detection and discrimination are based on the outputs of channels tuned to limited ranges of spatial frequency and orientation, even if a limited set of nonlinear interactions between these channels is allowed.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Pattern Selection Using the Bias and Variance of Ensemble

Shin, H., Cho, S.

Journal of the Korean Institute of Industrial Engineers, 28(1):112-127, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
[Abstract]: A useful pattern is a pattern that contributes much to learning. For a classification problem those patterns near the class boundary surfaces carry more information to the classifier. For a regression problem the ones near the estimated surface carry more information. In both cases, the usefulness is defined only for those patterns either without error or with negligible error. Using only the useful patterns gives several benefits. First, computational complexity in memory and time for learning is decreased. Second, overfitting is avoided even when the learner is over-sized. Third, learning results in more stable learners. In this paper, we propose a pattern “utility index” that measures the utility of an individual pattern. The utility index is based on the bias and variance of a pattern trained by a network ensemble. In classification, the pattern with a low bias and a high variance gets a high score. In regression, on the other hand, the one with a low bias and a low variance gets a high score. Based on the distribution of the utility index, the original training set is divided into a high-score group and a low-score group. Only the high-score group is then used for training. The proposed method is tested on synthetic and real-world benchmark datasets. The proposed approach gives a better or at least similar performance.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structure and Functionality of a Designed p53 Dimer.

Davison, TS., Nie, X., Ma, W., Lin, Y., Kay, C., Benchimol, S., Arrowsmith, C.

Journal of Molecular Biology, 307(2):605-617, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
P53 is a homotetrameric tumor suppressor protein involved in transcriptional control of genes that regulate cell proliferation and death. In order to probe the role that oligomerization plays in this capacity, we have previously designed and characterized a series of p53 proteins with altered oligomeric states through hydrophilc substitution of residues Met340 or Leu344 in the normally tetrameric oligomerization domain. Although such mutations have little effect on the overall secondary structural content of the oligomerization domain, both solubility and the resistance to thermal denaturation are substantially reduced relative to that of the wild-type domain. Here, we report the design and characterization of a double-mutant p53 with alterations of residues at positions Met340 and Leu344. The double-mutations Met340Glu/Leu344Lys and Met340Gln/Leu344Arg resulted in distinct dimeric forms of the protein. Furthermore, we have verified by NMR structure determination that the double-mutant Met340Gln/Leu344Arg is essentially a "half-tetramer". Analysis of the in vivo activities of full-length p53 oligomeric mutants reveals that while cell-cycle arrest requires tetrameric p53, transcriptional transactivation activity of monomers and dimers retain roughly background and half of the wild-type activity, respectively.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Kernel-Based Learning Algorithms

Müller, K., Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Tsuda, K., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 12(2):181-201, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
This paper provides an introduction to support vector machines, kernel Fisher discriminant analysis, and kernel principal component analysis, as examples for successful kernel-based learning methods. We first give a short background about Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory and kernel feature spaces and then proceed to kernel based learning in supervised and unsupervised scenarios including practical and algorithmic considerations. We illustrate the usefulness of kernel algorithms by discussing applications such as optical character recognition and DNA analysis

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Estimating the support of a high-dimensional distribution.

Schölkopf, B., Platt, J., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

Neural Computation, 13(7):1443-1471, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
Suppose you are given some data set drawn from an underlying probability distribution P and you want to estimate a “simple” subset S of input space such that the probability that a test point drawn from P lies outside of S equals some a priori specified value between 0 and 1. We propose a method to approach this problem by trying to estimate a function f that is positive on S and negative on the complement. The functional form of f is given by a kernel expansion in terms of a potentially small subset of the training data; it is regularized by controlling the length of the weight vector in an associated feature space. The expansion coefficients are found by solving a quadratic programming problem, which we do by carrying out sequential optimization over pairs of input patterns. We also provide a theoretical analysis of the statistical performance of our algorithm. The algorithm is a natural extension of the support vector algorithm to the case of unlabeled data.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: II. Bootstrap-based confidence intervals and sampling

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1314-1329, 2001 (article)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: I. Fitting, sampling and goodness-of-fit

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1293-1313, 2001 (article)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer'sperformance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. This paper, together with its companion paper (Wichmann & Hill, 2001), describes an integrated approach to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing the goodness of fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function'sparameters and other estimates derived from them, for the purposes of hypothesis testing. The present paper deals with the first two topics, describing a constrained maximum-likelihood method of parameter estimation and developing several goodness-of-fit tests. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we deal with two specific difficulties that arise when fitting functions to psychophysical data. First, we note that human observers are prone to stimulus-independent errors (or lapses ). We show that failure to account for this can lead to serious biases in estimates of the psychometric function'sparameters and illustrate how the problem may be overcome. Second, we note that psychophysical data sets are usually rather small by the standards required by most of the commonly applied statistical tests. We demonstrate the potential errors of applying traditional X^2 methods to psychophysical data and advocate use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory. We have made available the software to implement our methods

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The pedestal effect with a pulse train and its constituent sinusoids

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Twenty-Sixth Annual Interdisciplinary Conference, 2001 (poster)

Abstract
Curves showing "threshold" contrast for detecting a signal grating as a function of the contrast of a masking grating of the same orientation, spatial frequency, and phase show a characteristic improvement in performance at masker contrasts near the contrast threshold of the unmasked signal. Depending on the percentage of correct responses used to define the threshold, the best performance can be as much as a factor of three better than the unmasked threshold obtained in the absence of any masking grating. The result is called the pedestal effect (sometimes, the dipper function). We used a 2AFC procedure to measure the effect with harmonically related sinusoids ranging from 2 to 16 c/deg - all with maskers of the same orientation, spatial frequency and phase - and with masker contrasts ranging from 0 to 50%. The curves for different spatial frequencies are identical if both the vertical axis (showing the threshold signal contrast) and the horizontal axis (showing the masker contrast) are scaled by the threshold contrast of the signal obtained with no masker. Further, a pulse train with a fundamental frequency of 2 c/deg produces a curve that is indistinguishable from that of a 2-c/deg sinusoid despite the fact that at higher masker contrasts, the pulse train contains at least 8 components all of them equally detectable. The effect of adding 1-D spatial noise is also discussed.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The control structure of artificial creatures

Zhou, D., Dai, R.

Artificial Life and Robotics, 5(3), 2001, invited article (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Markovian domain fingerprinting: statistical segmentation of protein sequences

Bejerano, G., Seldin, Y., Margalit, H., Tishby, N.

Bioinformatics, 17(10):927-934, 2001 (article)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Modeling the Dynamics of Individual Neurons of the Stomatogastric Networks with Support Vector Machines

Frontzek, T., Gutzen, C., Lal, TN., Heinzel, H-G., Eckmiller, R., Böhm, H.

Abstract Proceedings of the 6th International Congress of Neuroethology (ICN'2001) Bonn, abstract 404, 2001 (poster)

Abstract
In small rhythmic active networks timing of individual neurons is crucial for generating different spatial-temporal motor patterns. Switching of one neuron between different rhythms can cause transition between behavioral modes. In order to understand the dynamics of rhythmically active neurons we analyzed the oscillatory membranpotential of a pacemaker neuron and used different neural network models to predict dynamics of its time series. In a first step we have trained conventional RBF networks and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) using gaussian kernels with intracellulary recordings of the pyloric dilatator neuron in the Australian crayfish, Cherax destructor albidus. As a rule SVMs were able to learn the nonlinear dynamics of pyloric neurons faster (e.g. 15s) than RBF networks (e.g. 309s) under the same hardware conditions. After training SVMs performed a better iterated one-step-ahead prediction of time series in the pyloric dilatator neuron with regard to test error and error sum. The test error decreased with increasing number of support vectors. The best SVM used 196 support vectors and produced a test error of 0.04622 as opposed to the best RBF with 0.07295 using 26 RBF-neurons. In pacemaker neuron PD the timepoint at which the membranpotential will cross threshold for generation of its oscillatory peak is most important for determination of the test error. Interestingly SVMs are especially better in predicting this important part of the membranpotential which is superimposed by various synaptic inputs, which drive the membranpotential to its threshold.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Isotropic second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities

Fischer, P., Buckingham, A., Albrecht, A.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 64(5), 2001 (article)

Abstract
The second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, in the electric dipole approximation, is only nonvanishing for materials that are noncentrosymmetric. Should the medium be isotropic, then only a chiral system. such as an optically active liquid, satisfies this symmetry requirement. We derive the quantum-mechanical form of the isotropic component of the sum- and difference-frequency susceptibility and discuss its unusual spectral properties. We show that any coherent second-order nonlinear optical process in a system of randomly oriented molecules requires the medium to be chiral. and the incident frequencies to be different and nonzero. Furthermore, a minimum of two nondegenerate excited molecular states are needed for the isotropic part of the susceptibility to be nonvanishing. The rotationally invariant susceptibility is zero in the static field limit and shows exceptionally sensitive resonance and dephasing effects that are particular to chiral centers.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Reply to “Comment on ‘Phenomenological damping in optical response tensors’”

Buckingham, A., Fischer, P.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 63(4), 2001 (article)

Abstract
We show that damping factors must not be incorporated in the perturbation of the ground state by a static electric field. If they are included, as in the theory of Stedman et al. {[}preceding Comment. Phys. Rev. A 63, 047801 (2001)], then there would be an electric dipole in the y direction induced in a hydrogen atom in the M-s = + 1/2 state by a static electric field in the x direction. Such a dipole is excluded by symmetry.

pf

DOI [BibTex]


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The coercivity of the melt-spun Sm-Fe-Ga-C permanent magnets and the effect of additives (Nb, Cu and Zr)

Zhang, J. X., Kleinschroth, I., Goll, D., Cuevas, F., Kronmüller, H.

{Journal of Physics-Condensed Matter}, 13(46):10487-10496, 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hardness-depth profile of a carbon-implanted Ti-6Al-4V alloy and its relation to composition and microstructure

Kunert, M., Kienzle, O., Baretzky, B., Baker, S. P., Mittemeijer, E. J.

{Journal of Materials Research}, 16(8):2321-2335, 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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New Sm(Co, Fe, Cu, Zr)(z) magnets with better temperature stability

Tang, W., Zhang, Y., Goll, D., Hadjipanayis, G. C., Kronmüller, H.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 226(Sp. Iss. SI):1365-1366, 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hydrogen in nanostructured vanadium-hydrogen systems

Orimo, S., Kimmerle, F., Majer, G.

{Physical Review B}, 63(9), 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Diffusion of hydrogen in heterogeneous systems

Herrmann, A., Schimmele, L., Mössinger, J., Hirscher, M., Kronmüller, H.

{Applied Physics A-Materials Science \& Processing}, 72(2):197-208, 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structural vacancies in B2-CoAl and NiAl

Meyer, B., Bester, G., Fähnle, M.

{Scripta Materialia}, 44, pages: 2485-2488, 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Grain boundary phase transition in the Cu-Bi system

Straumal, B. B., Prokofyev, S. I., Chang, L.-S., Sluchanko, N. E., Baretzky, B., Gust, W., Mittemeijer, E. J.

{Diffusion and Defect Forum}, 194-199, pages: 1343-1348, 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Carbon nanostructures: an efficient hydrogen storage medium for fuel cells

Atkinson, K., Roth, S., Hirscher, M., Grünwald, W.

{Fuel Cells Bulletin}, 4(38):9-12, 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]