Header logo is


2012


no image
Inferring Networks of Diffusion and Influence

Gomez Rodriguez, M., Leskovec, J., Krause, A.

ACM Transactions on Knowledge Discovery from Data, 5(4:21), February 2012 (article)

Abstract
Information diffusion and virus propagation are fundamental processes taking place in networks. While it is often possible to directly observe when nodes become infected with a virus or publish the information, observing individual transmissions (who infects whom, or who influences whom) is typically very difficult. Furthermore, in many applications, the underlying network over which the diffusions and propagations spread is actually unobserved. We tackle these challenges by developing a method for tracing paths of diffusion and influence through networks and inferring the networks over which contagions propagate. Given the times when nodes adopt pieces of information or become infected, we identify the optimal network that best explains the observed infection times. Since the optimization problem is NP-hard to solve exactly, we develop an efficient approximation algorithm that scales to large datasets and finds provably near-optimal networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by tracing information diffusion in a set of 170 million blogs and news articles over a one year period to infer how information flows through the online media space. We find that the diffusion network of news for the top 1,000 media sites and blogs tends to have a core-periphery structure with a small set of core media sites that diffuse information to the rest of the Web. These sites tend to have stable circles of influence with more general news media sites acting as connectors between them.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2012


Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Using probabilistic estimation of expression residuals (PEER) to obtain increased power and interpretability of gene expression analyses

Stegle, O., Parts, L., Piipari, M., Winn, J., Durbin, R.

Nature Protocols, 7(3):500–507, February 2012 (article)

Abstract
We present PEER (probabilistic estimation of expression residuals), a software package implementing statistical models that improve the sensitivity and interpretability of genetic associations in population-scale expression data. This approach builds on factor analysis methods that infer broad variance components in the measurements. PEER takes as input transcript profiles and covariates from a set of individuals, and then outputs hidden factors that explain much of the expression variability. Optionally, these factors can be interpreted as pathway or transcription factor activations by providing prior information about which genes are involved in the pathway or targeted by the factor. The inferred factors are used in genetic association analyses. First, they are treated as additional covariates, and are included in the model to increase detection power for mapping expression traits. Second, they are analyzed as phenotypes themselves to understand the causes of global expression variability. PEER extends previous related surrogate variable models and can be implemented within hours on a desktop computer.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Context-aware brain-computer interfaces: exploring the information space of user, technical system and environment

Zander, TO., Jatzev, S.

Journal of Neural Engineering, 9(1):016003, 10, February 2012 (article)

Abstract
Brain–computer interface (BCI) systems are usually applied in highly controlled environments such as research laboratories or clinical setups. However, many BCI-based applications are implemented in more complex environments. For example, patients might want to use a BCI system at home, and users without disabilities could benefit from BCI systems in special working environments. In these contexts, it might be more difficult to reliably infer information about brain activity, because many intervening factors add up and disturb the BCI feature space. One solution for this problem would be adding context awareness to the system. We propose to augment the available information space with additional channels carrying information about the user state, the environment and the technical system. In particular, passive BCI systems seem to be capable of adding highly relevant context information—otherwise covert aspects of user state. In this paper, we present a theoretical framework based on general human–machine system research for adding context awareness to a BCI system. Building on that, we present results from a study on a passive BCI, which allows access to the covert aspect of user state related to the perceived loss of control. This study is a proof of concept and demonstrates that context awareness could beneficially be implemented in and combined with a BCI system or a general human–machine system. The EEG data from this experiment are available for public download at www.phypa.org.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Expectation-Maximization methods for solving (PO)MDPs and optimal control problems

Toussaint, M., Storkey, A., Harmeling, S.

In Inference and Learning in Dynamic Models, (Editors: Barber, D., Cemgil, A.T. and Chiappa, S.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, January 2012 (inbook) In press

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Personalized medicine: from genotypes and molecular phenotypes towards computed therapy

Stegle, O., Roth, FP., Morris, Q., Listgarten, J.

In pages: 323-326, (Editors: Altman, R.B. , A.K. Dunker, L. Hunter, T. Murray, T.E. Klein), World Scientific Publishing, Singapore, Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing (PSB), January 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Joint genotyping and large-scale phenotyping of molecular traits are currently available for a number of important patient study cohorts and will soon become feasible in routine medical practice. These data are one component of several that are setting the stage for the development of personalized medicine, promising to yield better disease classification, enabling more specific treatment, and also allowing for improved preventive medical screening. This conference session explores statistical challenges and new opportunities that arise from application of genome-scale experimentation for personalized genomics and medicine.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Approximate Gaussian Integration using Expectation Propagation

Cunningham, J., Hennig, P., Lacoste-Julien, S.

In pages: 1-11, -, January 2012 (inproceedings) Submitted

Abstract
While Gaussian probability densities are omnipresent in applied mathematics, Gaussian cumulative probabilities are hard to calculate in any but the univariate case. We offer here an empirical study of the utility of Expectation Propagation (EP) as an approximate integration method for this problem. For rectangular integration regions, the approximation is highly accurate. We also extend the derivations to the more general case of polyhedral integration regions. However, we find that in this polyhedral case, EP's answer, though often accurate, can be almost arbitrarily wrong. These unexpected results elucidate an interesting and non-obvious feature of EP not yet studied in detail, both for the problem of Gaussian probabilities and for EP more generally.

ei pn

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
How the initialization affects the stability of the k-means algorithm

Bubeck, S., Meila, M., von Luxburg, U.

ESAIM: Probability and Statistics, 16, pages: 436-452, January 2012 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Joint Modelling of Confounding Factors and Prominent Genetic Regulators Provides Increased Accuracy in Genetical Genomics Studies

Fusi, N., Stegle, O., Lawrence, ND.

PLoS Computational Biology, 8(1):1-9, January 2012 (article)

Abstract
Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies are an integral tool to investigate the genetic component of gene expression variation. A major challenge in the analysis of such studies are hidden confounding factors, such as unobserved covariates or unknown subtle environmental perturbations. These factors can induce a pronounced artifactual correlation structure in the expression profiles, which may create spurious false associations or mask real genetic association signals. Here, we report PANAMA (Probabilistic ANAlysis of genoMic dAta), a novel probabilistic model to account for confounding factors within an eQTL analysis. In contrast to previous methods, PANAMA learns hidden factors jointly with the effect of prominent genetic regulators. As a result, this new model can more accurately distinguish true genetic association signals from confounding variation. We applied our model and compared it to existing methods on different datasets and biological systems. PANAMA consistently performs better than alternative methods, and finds in particular substantially more trans regulators. Importantly, our approach not only identifies a greater number of associations, but also yields hits that are biologically more plausible and can be better reproduced between independent studies. A software implementation of PANAMA is freely available online at http://ml.sheffield.ac.uk/qtl/.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Kernel Topic Models

Hennig, P., Stern, D., Herbrich, R., Graepel, T.

In Fifteenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, 22, pages: 511-519, JMLR Proceedings, (Editors: Lawrence, N. D. and Girolami, M.), JMLR.org, AISTATS , 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Latent Dirichlet Allocation models discrete data as a mixture of discrete distributions, using Dirichlet beliefs over the mixture weights. We study a variation of this concept, in which the documents' mixture weight beliefs are replaced with squashed Gaussian distributions. This allows documents to be associated with elements of a Hilbert space, admitting kernel topic models (KTM), modelling temporal, spatial, hierarchical, social and other structure between documents. The main challenge is efficient approximate inference on the latent Gaussian. We present an approximate algorithm cast around a Laplace approximation in a transformed basis. The KTM can also be interpreted as a type of Gaussian process latent variable model, or as a topic model conditional on document features, uncovering links between earlier work in these areas.

ei pn

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Bayesian flexible fitting of biomolecular structures into EM maps

Habeck, M.

Biophysical journal, 2012 (article) Submitted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Structured Apprenticeship Learning

Boularias, A., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

In European Conference on Machine Learning and Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (ECML-PKDD), 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Blind Correction of Optical Aberrations

Schuler, C., Hirsch, M., Harmeling, S., Schölkopf, B.

In Computer Vision - ECCV 2012, LNCS Vol. 7574, pages: 187-200, (Editors: A Fitzgibbon, S Lazebnik, P Perona, Y Sato, and C Schmid), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 12th IEEE European Conference on Computer Vision, ECCV, 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Camera lenses are a critical component of optical imaging systems, and lens imperfections compromise image quality. While traditionally, sophisticated lens design and quality control aim at limiting optical aberrations, recent works [1,2,3] promote the correction of optical flaws by computational means. These approaches rely on elaborate measurement procedures to characterize an optical system, and perform image correction by non-blind deconvolution. In this paper, we present a method that utilizes physically plausible assumptions to estimate non-stationary lens aberrations blindly, and thus can correct images without knowledge of specifics of camera and lens. The blur estimation features a novel preconditioning step that enables fast deconvolution. We obtain results that are competitive with state-of-the-art non-blind approaches.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Interactive Domain Adaptation Technique for the Classification of Remote Sensing Images

Persello, C., Dinuzzo, F.

In IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium , pages: 6872-6875, IEEE, IGARSS, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Point Cloud Completion Using Symmetries and Extrusions

Kroemer, O., Ben Amor, H., Ewerton, M., Peters, J.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots , pages: 680-685, IEEE, HUMANOIDS, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Measurement and Calibration of Noise Bias in Weak Lensing Galaxy Shape Estimation

Kacprzak, T., Zuntz, J., Rowe, B., Bridle, S., Refregier, A., Amara, A., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS), 2012 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
The representer theorem for Hilbert spaces: a necessary and sufficient condition

Dinuzzo, F., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 25, pages: 189-196, (Editors: P Bartlett, FCN Pereira, CJC. Burges, L Bottou, and KQ Weinberger), Curran Associates Inc., 26th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
LMM-Lasso: A Lasso Multi-Marker Mixed Model for Association Mapping with Population Structure Correction

Rakitsch, B., Lippert, C., Stegle, O., Borgwardt, KM.

Bioinformatics, 29(2):206-214, 2012 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Inferential structure determination from NMR data

Habeck, M.

In Bayesian methods in structural bioinformatics, pages: 287-312, (Editors: Hamelryck, T., Mardia, K. V. and Ferkinghoff-Borg, J.), Springer, New York, 2012 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Same, same, but different: EEG correlates of n-back and span working memory tasks

Scharinger, C., Cienak, G., Walter, C., Zander, TO., Gerjets, P.

In Proceedings of the 48th Congress of the German Society for Psychology, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Existential neuroscience: a functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of neural responses to reminders of one’s mortality

Quirin, M., Loktyushin, A., Arndt, J., Küstermann, E., Lo, Y., Kuhl, J., Eggert, L.

Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 7(2):193-198, 2012 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Active learning for domain adaptation in the supervised classification of remote sensing images

Persello, C., Bruzzone, L.

IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 50(11):4468-4483, 2012 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Robot Learning

Sigaud, O., Peters, J.

In Encyclopedia of the sciences of learning, (Editors: Seel, N.M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Probabilistic Modeling of Human Movements for Intention Inference

Wang, Z., Deisenroth, M., Ben Amor, H., Vogt, D., Schölkopf, B., Peters, J.

In Proceedings of Robotics: Science and Systems VIII, pages: 8, R:SS, 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Inference of human intention may be an essential step towards understanding human actions [21] and is hence important for realizing efficient human-robot interaction. In this paper, we propose the Intention-Driven Dynamics Model (IDDM), a latent variable model for inferring unknown human intentions. We train the model based on observed human behaviors/actions and we introduce an approximate inference algorithm to efficiently infer the human’s intention from an ongoing action. We verify the feasibility of the IDDM in two scenarios, i.e., target inference in robot table tennis and action recognition for interactive humanoid robots. In both tasks, the IDDM achieves substantial improvements over state-of-the-art regression and classification.

ei

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Solving Nonlinear Continuous State-Action-Observation POMDPs for Mechanical Systems with Gaussian Noise

Deisenroth, M., Peters, J.

In The 10th European Workshop on Reinforcement Learning (EWRL), 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
On Causal and Anticausal Learning

Schölkopf, B., Janzing, D., Peters, J., Sgouritsa, E., Zhang, K., Mooij, J.

In Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 1255-1262, (Editors: J Langford and J Pineau), Omnipress, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


no image
Reinforcement Learning in Robotics: A Survey

Kober, J., Peters, J.

In Reinforcement Learning, 12, pages: 579-610, (Editors: Wiering, M. and Otterlo, M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

Abstract
As most action generation problems of autonomous robots can be phrased in terms of sequential decision problems, robotics offers a tremendously important and interesting application platform for reinforcement learning. Similarly, the real-world challenges of this domain pose a major real-world check for reinforcement learning. Hence, the interplay between both disciplines can be seen as promising as the one between physics and mathematics. Nevertheless, only a fraction of the scientists working on reinforcement learning are sufficiently tied to robotics to oversee most problems encountered in this context. Thus, we will bring the most important challenges faced by robot reinforcement learning to their attention. To achieve this goal, we will attempt to survey most work that has successfully applied reinforcement learning to behavior generation for real robots. We discuss how the presented successful approaches have been made tractable despite the complexity of the domain and will study how representations or the inclusion of prior knowledge can make a significant difference. As a result, a particular focus of our chapter lies on the choice between model-based and model-free as well as between value function-based and policy search methods. As a result, we obtain a fairly complete survey of robot reinforcement learning which should allow a general reinforcement learning researcher to understand this domain.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Learning from distributions via support measure machines

Muandet, K., Fukumizu, K., Dinuzzo, F., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 25, pages: 10-18, (Editors: P Bartlett, FCN Pereira, CJC. Burges, L Bottou, and KQ Weinberger), Curran Associates Inc., 26th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Scalable nonconvex inexact proximal splitting

Sra, S.

In Advances of Neural Information Processing Systems 25, pages: 539-547, (Editors: P Bartlett and FCN Pereira and CJC. Burges and L Bottou and KQ Weinberger), Curran Associates Inc., 26th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
A min-cut solution to mapping phenotypes to networks of genetic markers

Azencott, C., Grimm, D., Kawahara, Y., Borgwardt, K.

In 17th Annual International Conference on Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB), 2012 (inproceedings) Submitted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Efficiently mapping phenotypes to networks of genetic loci

Azencott, C., Grimm, D., Kawahara, Y., Borgwardt, K.

In NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology (MLCB), 2012 (inproceedings) Submitted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Modelling transition dynamics in MDPs with RKHS embeddings

Grünewälder, S., Lever, G., Baldassarre, L., Pontil, M., Gretton, A.

In Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 535-542, (Editors: J Langford and J Pineau), Omnipress, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Clustering: Science or Art?

von Luxburg, U., Williamson, R., Guyon, I.

In JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings, Volume 27, pages: 65-79, Workshop on Unsupervised Learning and Transfer Learning, 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We examine whether the quality of di erent clustering algorithms can be compared by a general, scienti cally sound procedure which is independent of particular clustering algorithms. We argue that the major obstacle is the diculty in evaluating a clustering algorithm without taking into account the context: why does the user cluster his data in the rst place, and what does he want to do with the clustering afterwards? We argue that clustering should not be treated as an application-independent mathematical problem, but should always be studied in the context of its end-use. Di erent techniques to evaluate clustering algorithms have to be developed for di erent uses of clustering. To simplify this procedure we argue that it will be useful to build a \taxonomy of clustering problems" to identify clustering applications which can be treated in a uni ed way and that such an e ort will be more fruitful than attempting the impossible | developing \optimal" domain-independent clustering algorithms or even classifying clustering algorithms in terms of how they work.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Reinforcement learning to adjust parametrized motor primitives to new situations

Kober, J., Wilhelm, A., Oztop, E., Peters, J.

Autonomous Robots, 33(4):361-379, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Humans manage to adapt learned movements very quickly to new situations by generalizing learned behaviors from similar situations. In contrast, robots currently often need to re-learn the complete movement. In this paper, we propose a method that learns to generalize parametrized motor plans by adapting a small set of global parameters, called meta-parameters. We employ reinforcement learning to learn the required meta-parameters to deal with the current situation, described by states. We introduce an appropriate reinforcement learning algorithm based on a kernelized version of the reward-weighted regression. To show its feasibility, we evaluate this algorithm on a toy example and compare it to several previous approaches. Subsequently, we apply the approach to three robot tasks, i.e., the generalization of throwing movements in darts, of hitting movements in table tennis, and of throwing balls where the tasks are learned on several different real physical robots, i.e., a Barrett WAM, a BioRob, the JST-ICORP/SARCOS CBi and a Kuka KR 6.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
A Brain-Robot Interface for Studying Motor Learning after Stroke

Meyer, T., Peters, J., Brötz, D., Zander, T., Schölkopf, B., Soekadar, S., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

In IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pages: 4078 - 4083 , IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IROS, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Generalization of Human Grasping for Multi-Fingered Robot Hands

Ben Amor, H., Kroemer, O., Hillenbrand, U., Neumann, G., Peters, J.

In IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems , pages: 2043-2050, IROS, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Learning Concurrent Motor Skills in Versatile Solution Spaces

Daniel, C., Neumann, G., Peters, J.

In IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems , pages: 3591-3597, IROS, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Learning to Select and Generalize Striking Movements in Robot Table Tennis

Mülling, K., Kober, J., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

In AAAI Fall Symposium on Robots Learning Interactively from Human Teachers, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
On the Empirical Estimation of Integral Probability Metrics

Sriperumbudur, B., Fukumizu, K., Gretton, A., Schölkopf, B., Lanckriet, G.

Electronic Journal of Statistics, 6, pages: 1550-1599, 2012 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Computational vascular morphometry for the assessment of pulmonary vascular disease based on scale-space particles

Estépar, R., Ross, J., Krissian, K., Schultz, T., Washko, G., Kindlmann, G.

In pages: 1479-1482, IEEE, 9th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) , 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Hilbert space embedding for Dirichlet Process mixtures

Muandet, K.

In NIPS Workshop on confluence between kernel methods and graphical models, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


no image
Causal discovery with scale-mixture model for spatiotemporal variance dependencies

Chen, Z., Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 25, pages: 1736-1744, (Editors: P Bartlett and FCN Pereira and CJC. Burges and L Bottou and KQ Weinberger), Curran Associates Inc., 26th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


no image
Bridging Offline and Online Social Graph Dynamics

Gomez Rodriguez, M., Rogati, M.

In 21st ACM Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, pages: 2447-2450, (Editors: Chen, X., Lebanon, G., Wang, H. and Zaki, M. J.), ACM, CIKM, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
A new metric on the manifold of kernel matrices with application to matrix geometric means

Sra, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 25, pages: 144-152, (Editors: P Bartlett and FCN Pereira and CJC. Burges and L Bottou and KQ Weinberger), Curran Associates Inc., 26th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

Lois, C., Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Werner, M., Kupferschläger, J., Beyer, T.

European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 39(11):1756-1766, 2012 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Conditional mean embeddings as regressors

Grünewälder, S., Lever, G., Baldassarre, L., Patterson, S., Gretton, A., Pontil, M.

In Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 1823-1830, (Editors: J Langford and J Pineau), Omnipress, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Multitask Learning in Computational Biology

Widmer, C., Rätsch, G.

JMLR W\&CP. ICML 2011 Unsupervised and Transfer Learning Workshop, 27, pages: 207-216, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Computational Biology provides a wide range of applications for Multitask Learning (MTL) methods. As the generation of labels often is very costly in the biomedical domain, combining data from different related problems or tasks is a promising strategy to reduce label cost. In this paper, we present two problems from sequence biology, where MTL was successfully applied. For this, we use regularization-based MTL methods, with a special focus on the case of a hierarchical relationship between tasks. Furthermore, we propose strategies to refine the measure of task relatedness, which is of central importance in MTL and finally give some practical guidelines, when MTL strategies are likely to pay off.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Shortest path distance in random k-nearest neighbor graphs

Alamgir, M., von Luxburg, U.

In Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Machine Learning, International Machine Learning Society, International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Toward Fast Policy Search for Learning Legged Locomotion

Deisenroth, M., Calandra, R., Seyfarth, A., Peters, J.

In IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems , pages: 1787-1792, IROS, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Robot Skill Learning

Peters, J., Kober, J., Mülling, K., Nguyen-Tuong, D., Kroemer, O.

In 20th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence , pages: 40-45, ECAI, 2012 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]