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2015


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Phase evolution in single-crystalline LiFePO4 followed by in situ scanning X-ray microscopy of a micrometre-sized battery

Ohmer, N., Fenk, B., Samuelis, D., Chen, C., Maier, J., Weigand, M., Goering, E., Schütz, G.

{Nature Communications}, 6, Nature Publishing Group, London, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

2015


DOI [BibTex]


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Nitrogen-rich covalent triazine frameworks as high-performance platforms for selective carbon capture and storage

Hug, S., Stegbauer, L., Oh, H., Hirscher, M., Lotsch, B. V.

{Chemistry of Materials}, 27(23):8001-8010, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Novel plasticity rule can explain the development of sensorimotor intelligence

Der, R., Martius, G.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(45):E6224-E6232, 2015 (article)

Abstract
Grounding autonomous behavior in the nervous system is a fundamental challenge for neuroscience. In particular, self-organized behavioral development provides more questions than answers. Are there special functional units for curiosity, motivation, and creativity? This paper argues that these features can be grounded in synaptic plasticity itself, without requiring any higher-level constructs. We propose differential extrinsic plasticity (DEP) as a new synaptic rule for self-learning systems and apply it to a number of complex robotic systems as a test case. Without specifying any purpose or goal, seemingly purposeful and adaptive rhythmic behavior is developed, displaying a certain level of sensorimotor intelligence. These surprising results require no system-specific modifications of the DEP rule. They rather arise from the underlying mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking, which is due to the tight brain body environment coupling. The new synaptic rule is biologically plausible and would be an interesting target for neurobiological investigation. We also argue that this neuronal mechanism may have been a catalyst in natural evolution.

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Multilayer Fresnel zone plates for X-ray microscopy

Sanli, U. T., Keskinbora, K., Grévent, C., Szeghalmi, A., Knez, M., Schütz, G.

{Microscopy and Microanalysis}, 21(Suppl 3):1987-1988, Springer-Verlag New York, New York, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Interfacial dominated ferromagnetism in nanograined ZnO: a \muSR and DFT study

Tietze, T., Audehm, P., Chen, Y., Schütz, G., Straumal, B. B., Protasova, S. G., Mazilkin, A. A., Straumal, P. B., Prokscha, T., Luetkens, H., Salman, Z., Suter, A., Baretzky, B., Fink, K., Wenzel, W., Danilov, D., Goering, E.

{Scientific Reports}, 5, pages: 8871-8876, Nature Publishing Group, London, UK, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Preparation of a ferromagnetic barrier in YBa2Cu3O7-delta thinner than the coherence length

Soltan, S., Albrecht, J., Goering, E., Schütz, G., Mustafa, L., Keimer, B., Habermeier, H.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 118(22), AIP Publishing, New York, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Microanalytical methods for in-situ high-resolution analysis of rock varnish at the micrometer to nanometer scale

Macholdt, D. S., Jochum, K. P., Pöhlker, C., Stoll, B., Weis, U., Weber, B., Müller, M., Kapl, M., Buhre, S., Kilcoyne, A. L. D., Weigand, M., Scholz, D., Al-Amri, A. M., Andreae, M. O.

{Chemical Geology}, 411, pages: 57-68, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

Mikhailov, E. F., Mironov, G. N., Pöhlker, C., Chi, X., Krüger, M., Shiraiwa, M., Förster, J., Pöschl, U., Vlasenko, S. S., Ryshkevich, T. I., Weigand, M., Kilcoyne, A. L. D., Andreae, M.

{Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}, 15(15):8847-8869, European Geosciences Union, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Orbital reflectometry of PrNiO3/PrAlO3 superlattices

Wu, M., Benckiser, E., Audehm, P., Goering, E., Wochner, P., Christiani, G., Logvenov, G., Habermeier, H., Keimer, B.

{Physical Review B}, 91(19), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Dynamic domain wall chirality rectification by rotating magnetic fields

Bisig, A., Mawass, M., Stärk, M., Moutafis, C., Rhensius, J., Heidler, J., Gliga, S., Weigand, M., Tyliszczak, T., Van Waeyenberge, B., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Kläui, M.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106(12), American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Imaging spin dynamics on the nanoscale using X-ray microscopy

Stoll, H., Noske, M., Weigand, M., Richter, K., Krüger, B., Reeve, R. M., Hänze, M., Adolff, C. F., Stein, F., Meier, G., Kläui, M., Schütz, G.

{Frontiers in Physics}, 3, Frontiers Media, Lausanne, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structure Learning in Bayesian Sensorimotor Integration

Genewein, T, Hez, E, Razzaghpanah, Z, Braun, DA

PLoS Computational Biology, 11(8):1-27, August 2015 (article)

Abstract
Previous studies have shown that sensorimotor processing can often be described by Bayesian learning, in particular the integration of prior and feedback information depending on its degree of reliability. Here we test the hypothesis that the integration process itself can be tuned to the statistical structure of the environment. We exposed human participants to a reaching task in a three-dimensional virtual reality environment where we could displace the visual feedback of their hand position in a two dimensional plane. When introducing statistical structure between the two dimensions of the displacement, we found that over the course of several days participants adapted their feedback integration process in order to exploit this structure for performance improvement. In control experiments we found that this adaptation process critically depended on performance feedback and could not be induced by verbal instructions. Our results suggest that structural learning is an important meta-learning component of Bayesian sensorimotor integration.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Voltage-induced magnetic manipulation of a microstructured iron gold multilayer system

Sittig, Robert

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2015 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Unique high-temperature performance of highly consensed MnBi permanent magnets

Chen, Y., Gregori, G., Leineweber, A., Qu, F., Chen, C., Tietze, T., Kronmüller, H., Schütz, G., Goering, E.

{Scripta Materialia}, 107, pages: 131-135, Pergamon, Tarrytown, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Quantifying Emergent Behavior of Autonomous Robots

Martius, G., Olbrich, E.

Entropy, 17(10):7266, 2015 (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Electrical determination of vortex state in submicron magnetic elements

Gangwar, A., Bauer, H. G., Chauleau, J., Noske, M., Weigand, M., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Back, C. H.

{Physical Review B}, 91(9), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Mechanisms for the symmetric and antisymmetric switching of a magnetic vortex core: Differences and common aspects

Noske, M., Stoll, H., Fähnle, M., Hertel, R., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review B}, 91(1), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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High resolution, high efficiency mulitlayer Fresnel zone plates for soft and hard X-rays

Sanli, U., Keskinbora, K., Gregorczyk, K., Leister, J., Teeny, N., Grévent, C., Knez, M., Schütz, G.

{Proceedings of SPIE}, 9592, SPIE, Bellingham, Washington, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Macroscopic drift current in the inverse Faraday effect

Hertel, R., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 91(2), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Single-step 3D nanofabrication of kinoform optics via gray-scale focused ion beam lithography for efficient X-ray focusing

Keskinbora, K., Grévent, C., Hirscher, M., Weigand, M., Schütz, G.

{Advanced Optical Materials}, 3, pages: 792-800, WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Band structure engineering of two-dimensional magnonic vortex crystals

Behncke, C., Hänze, M., Adolff, C. F., Weigand, M., Meier, G.

{Physical Review B}, 91(22), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Towards denoising XMCD movies of fast magnetization dynamics using extended Kalman filter

Kopp, M., Harmeling, S., Schütz, G., Schölkopf, B., Fähnle, M.

{Ultramicroscopy}, 148, pages: 115-122, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Reward-Maximizing Spiking Neuron as a Bounded Rational Decision Maker

Leibfried, F, Braun, DA

Neural Computation, 27(8):1686-1720, July 2015 (article)

Abstract
Rate distortion theory describes how to communicate relevant information most efficiently over a channel with limited capacity. One of the many applications of rate distortion theory is bounded rational decision making, where decision makers are modeled as information channels that transform sensory input into motor output under the constraint that their channel capacity is limited. Such a bounded rational decision maker can be thought to optimize an objective function that trades off the decision maker's utility or cumulative reward against the information processing cost measured by the mutual information between sensory input and motor output. In this study, we interpret a spiking neuron as a bounded rational decision maker that aims to maximize its expected reward under the computational constraint that the mutual information between the neuron's input and output is upper bounded. This abstract computational constraint translates into a penalization of the deviation between the neuron's instantaneous and average firing behavior. We derive a synaptic weight update rule for such a rate distortion optimizing neuron and show in simulations that the neuron efficiently extracts reward-relevant information from the input by trading off its synaptic strengths against the collected reward.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi

Krannich, S., Sidis, Y., Lamago, D., Heid, R., Mignot, J., von Löhneysen, H., Ivanov, A., Steffens, P., Keller, T., Wang, L., Goering, E., Weber, F.

{Nature Communications}, 6, Nature Publishing Group, London, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Transfer of angular momentum from the spin system to the lattice during ultrafast magnetization

Tsatsoulis, T.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2015 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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What is epistemic value in free energy models of learning and acting? A bounded rationality perspective

Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

Cognitive Neuroscience, 6(4):215-216, December 2015 (article)

Abstract
Free energy models of learning and acting do not only care about utility or extrinsic value, but also about intrinsic value, that is, the information value stemming from probability distributions that represent beliefs or strategies. While these intrinsic values can be interpreted as epistemic values or exploration bonuses under certain conditions, the framework of bounded rationality offers a complementary interpretation in terms of information-processing costs that we discuss here.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Derivation of phenomenological expressions for transition matrix elements for electron-phonon scattering

Illg, C., Haag, M., Müller, B. Y., Czycholl, G., Fähnle, M.

2015 (misc)

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link (url) [BibTex]


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Quantum kinetic theory of ultrafast demagnetization by electron-phonon scattering

Briones Paz, J. Z.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2015 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Perpendicular magnetisation from in-plane fields in nano-scaled antidot lattices

Gräfe, J., Haering, F., Tietze, T., Audehm, P., Weigand, M., Wiedwald, U., Ziemann, P., Gawronski, P., Schütz, G., Goering, E. J.

{Nanotechnology}, 26(22), IOP Pub., Bristol, UK, 2015 (article)

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Theory of ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser pulses

Fähnle, M., Illg, C., Haag, M., Teeny, N.

{Acta Physica Polonica A}, 127(2):170-175, Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, Warszawa, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Non-linear radial spinwave modes in thin magnetic disks

Helsen, M., Gangwar, Ajay, De Clercq, J., Vansteenkiste, A., Weigand, M., Back, C. H., Van Waeyenberge, B.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106(3), American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Hydrogen isotope separation in metal-organic frameworks: Kinetic or chemical affinity quantum-sieving?

Savchenko, I., Mavrandonakis, A., Heine, T., Oh, H., Teufel, J., Hirscher, M.

{Microporous and Mesoporous Materials}, 216, pages: 133-137, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

Ruoß, S., Stahl, C., Weigand, M., Schütz, G., Albrecht, J.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106, American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Preparation and characterisation of epitaxial Pt/Cu/FeMn/Co thin films on (100)-oriented MgO single crystals

Schmidt, M., Gräfe, J., Audehm, P., Phillipp, F., Schütz, G., Goering, E.

{Physica Status Solidi A}, 212(10):2114-2123, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Probing the magnetic moments of [MnIII6CrIII]3+ single-molecule magnets - A cross comparison of XMCD and spin-resolved electron spectroscopy

Helmstedt, A., Dohmeier, N., Müller, N., Gryzia, A., Brechling, A., Heinzmann, U., Hoeke, V., Krickemeyer, E., Glaser, T., Leicht, P., Fonin, M., Tietze, T., Joly, L., Kuepper, K.

{Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena}, 198, pages: 12-19, Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2008


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Modelling contrast discrimination data suggest both the pedestal effect and stochastic resonance to be caused by the same mechanism

Goris, R., Wagemans, J., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 8(15):1-21, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Computational models of spatial vision typically make use of a (rectified) linear filter, a nonlinearity and dominant late noise to account for human contrast discrimination data. Linear–nonlinear cascade models predict an improvement in observers' contrast detection performance when low, subthreshold levels of external noise are added (i.e., stochastic resonance). Here, we address the issue whether a single contrast gain-control model of early spatial vision can account for both the pedestal effect, i.e., the improved detectability of a grating in the presence of a low-contrast masking grating, and stochastic resonance. We measured contrast discrimination performance without noise and in both weak and moderate levels of noise. Making use of a full quantitative description of our data with few parameters combined with comprehensive model selection assessments, we show the pedestal effect to be more reduced in the presence of weak noise than in moderate noise. This reduction rules out independent, additive sources of performance improvement and, together with a simulation study, supports the parsimonious explanation that a single mechanism underlies the pedestal effect and stochastic resonance in contrast perception.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]


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gBoost: A Mathematical Programming Approach to Graph Classification and Regression

Saigo, H., Nowozin, S., Kadowaki, T., Kudo, T., Tsuda, K.

Machine Learning, 75(1):69-89, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Graph mining methods enumerate frequently appearing subgraph patterns, which can be used as features for subsequent classification or regression. However, frequent patterns are not necessarily informative for the given learning problem. We propose a mathematical programming boosting method (gBoost) that progressively collects informative patterns. Compared to AdaBoost, gBoost can build the prediction rule with fewer iterations. To apply the boosting method to graph data, a branch-and-bound pattern search algorithm is developed based on the DFS code tree. The constructed search space is reused in later iterations to minimize the computation time. Our method can learn more efficiently than the simpler method based on frequent substructure mining, because the output labels are used as an extra information source for pruning the search space. Furthermore, by engineering the mathematical program, a wide range of machine learning problems can be solved without modifying the pattern search algorithm.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Machine Learning for Motor Skills in Robotics

Peters, J.

K{\"u}nstliche Intelligenz, 2008(4):41-43, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Autonomous robots that can adapt to novel situations has been a long standing vision of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. Early approaches to this goal during the heydays of artificial intelligence research in the late 1980s, however, made it clear that an approach purely based on reasoning or human insights would not be able to model all the perceptuomotor tasks of future robots. Instead, new hope was put in the growing wake of machine learning that promised fully adaptive control algorithms which learn both by observation and trial-and-error. However, to date, learning techniques have yet to fulfill this promise as only few methods manage to scale into the high-dimensional domains of manipulator and humanoid robotics and usually scaling was only achieved in precisely pre-structured domains. We have investigated the ingredients for a general approach to motor skill learning in order to get one step closer towards human-like performance. For doing so, we study two major components for such an approach, i.e., firstly, a theoretically well-founded general approach to representing the required control structures for task representation and execution and, secondly, appropriate learning algorithms which can be applied in this setting.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernels, Regularization and Differential Equations

Steinke, F., Schölkopf, B.

Pattern Recognition, 41(11):3271-3286, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Many common machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines or Gaussian process inference make use of positive definite kernels, reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, Gaussian processes, and regularization operators. In this work these objects are presented in a general, unifying framework, and interrelations are highlighted. With this in mind we then show how linear stochastic differential equation models can be incorporated naturally into the kernel framework. And vice versa, many kernel machines can be interpreted in terms of differential equations. We focus especially on ordinary differential equations, also known as dynamical systems, and it is shown that standard kernel inference algorithms are equivalent to Kalman filter methods based on such models. In order not to cloud qualitative insights with heavy mathematical machinery, we restrict ourselves to finite domains, implying that differential equations are treated via their corresponding finite difference equations.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Mixture Models for Protein Structure Ensembles

Hirsch, M., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 24(19):2184-2192, October 2008 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Structure of the human voltage-dependent anion channel

Bayrhuber, M., Meins, T., Habeck, M., Becker, S., Giller, K., Villinger, S., Vonrhein, C., Griesinger, C., Zweckstetter, M., Zeth, K.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105(40):15370-15375, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), also known as mitochondrial porin, is the most abundant protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). VDAC is the channel known to guide the metabolic flux across the MOM and plays a key role in mitochondrially induced apoptosis. Here, we present the 3D structure of human VDAC1, which was solved conjointly by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Human VDAC1 (hVDAC1) adopts a β-barrel architecture composed of 19 β-strands with an α-helix located horizontally midway within the pore. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that this channel architecture is common to all VDAC proteins and is adopted by the general import pore TOM40 of mammals, which is also located in the MOM.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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MRI-Based Attenuation Correction for PET/MRI: A Novel Approach Combining Pattern Recognition and Atlas Registration

Hofmann, M., Steinke, F., Scheel, V., Charpiat, G., Farquhar, J., Aschoff, P., Brady, M., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 49(11):1875-1883, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
For quantitative PET information, correction of tissue photon attenuation is mandatory. Generally in conventional PET, the attenuation map is obtained from a transmission scan, which uses a rotating radionuclide source, or from the CT scan in a combined PET/CT scanner. In the case of PET/MRI scanners currently under development, insufficient space for the rotating source exists; the attenuation map can be calculated from the MR image instead. This task is challenging because MR intensities correlate with proton densities and tissue-relaxation properties, rather than with attenuation-related mass density. METHODS: We used a combination of local pattern recognition and atlas registration, which captures global variation of anatomy, to predict pseudo-CT images from a given MR image. These pseudo-CT images were then used for attenuation correction, as the process would be performed in a PET/CT scanner. RESULTS: For human brain scans, we show on a database of 17 MR/CT image pairs that our method reliably enables e stimation of a pseudo-CT image from the MR image alone. On additional datasets of MRI/PET/CT triplets of human brain scans, we compare MRI-based attenuation correction with CT-based correction. Our approach enables PET quantification with a mean error of 3.2% for predefined regions of interest, which we found to be clinically not significant. However, our method is not specific to brain imaging, and we show promising initial results on 1 whole-body animal dataset. CONCLUSION: This method allows reliable MRI-based attenuation correction for human brain scans. Further work is necessary to validate the method for whole-body imaging.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines and Kernels for Computational Biology

Ben-Hur, A., Ong, C., Sonnenburg, S., Schölkopf, B., Rätsch, G.

PLoS Computational Biology, 4(10: e1000173):1-10, October 2008 (article)

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Approximations for Binary Gaussian Process Classification

Nickisch, H., Rasmussen, C.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 9, pages: 2035-2078, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
We provide a comprehensive overview of many recent algorithms for approximate inference in Gaussian process models for probabilistic binary classification. The relationships between several approaches are elucidated theoretically, and the properties of the different algorithms are corroborated by experimental results. We examine both 1) the quality of the predictive distributions and 2) the suitability of the different marginal likelihood approximations for model selection (selecting hyperparameters) and compare to a gold standard based on MCMC. Interestingly, some methods produce good predictive distributions although their marginal likelihood approximations are poor. Strong conclusions are drawn about the methods: The Expectation Propagation algorithm is almost always the method of choice unless the computational budget is very tight. We also extend existing methods in various ways, and provide unifying code implementing all approaches.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Accurate NMR Structures Through Minimization of an Extended Hybrid Energy

Nilges, M., Bernard, A., Bardiaux, B., Malliavin, T., Habeck, M., Rieping, W.

Structure, 16(9):1305-1312, September 2008 (article)

Abstract
The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X–ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications—for example, in homology modeling.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Similarity, Kernels, and the Triangle Inequality

Jäkel, F., Schölkopf, B., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 52(5):297-303, September 2008 (article)

Abstract
Similarity is used as an explanatory construct throughout psychology and multidimensional scaling (MDS) is the most popular way to assess similarity. In MDS, similarity is intimately connected to the idea of a geometric representation of stimuli in a perceptual space. Whilst connecting similarity and closeness of stimuli in a geometric representation may be intuitively plausible, Tversky and Gati [Tversky, A., Gati, I. (1982). Similarity, separability, and the triangle inequality. Psychological Review, 89(2), 123–154] have reported data which are inconsistent with the usual geometric representations that are based on segmental additivity. We show that similarity measures based on Shepard’s universal law of generalization [Shepard, R. N. (1987). Toward a universal law of generalization for psychologica science. Science, 237(4820), 1317–1323] lead to an inner product representation in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. In such a space stimuli are represented by their similarity to all other stimuli. This representation, based on Shepard’s law, has a natural metric that does not have additive segments whilst still retaining the intuitive notion of connecting similarity and distance between stimuli. Furthermore, this representation has the psychologically appealing property that the distance between stimuli is bounded.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Comparison of Pattern Recognition Methods in Classifying High-resolution BOLD Signals Obtained at High Magnetic Field in Monkeys

Ku, S., Gretton, A., Macke, J., Logothetis, N.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 26(7):1007-1014, September 2008 (article)

Abstract
Pattern recognition methods have shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data can reveal significant information about brain activity. For example, in the debate of how object categories are represented in the brain, multivariate analysis has been used to provide evidence of a distributed encoding scheme [Science 293:5539 (2001) 2425–2430]. Many follow-up studies have employed different methods to analyze human fMRI data with varying degrees of success [Nature reviews 7:7 (2006) 523–534]. In this study, we compare four popular pattern recognition methods: correlation analysis, support-vector machines (SVM), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and Gaussian naïve Bayes (GNB), using data collected at high field (7 Tesla) with higher resolution than usual fMRI studies. We investigate prediction performance on single trials and for averages across varying numbers of stimulus presentations. The performance of the various algorithms depends on the nature of the brain activity being categorized: for several tasks, many of the methods work well, whereas for others, no method performs above chance level. An important factor in overall classification performance is careful preprocessing of the data, including dimensionality reduction, voxel selection and outlier elimination.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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A Single-shot Measurement of the Energy of Product States in a Translation Invariant Spin Chain Can Replace Any Quantum Computation

Janzing, D., Wocjan, P., Zhang, S.

New Journal of Physics, 10(093004):1-18, September 2008 (article)

Abstract
In measurement-based quantum computation, quantum algorithms are implemented via sequences of measurements. We describe a translationally invariant finite-range interaction on a one-dimensional qudit chain and prove that a single-shot measurement of the energy of an appropriate computational basis state with respect to this Hamiltonian provides the output of any quantum circuit. The required measurement accuracy scales inverse polynomially with the size of the simulated quantum circuit. This shows that the implementation of energy measurements on generic qudit chains is as hard as the realization of quantum computation. Here, a ‘measurement‘ is any procedure that samples from the spectral measurement induced by the observable and the state under consideration. As opposed to measurement-based quantum computation, the post-measurement state is irrelevant.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning for Motor Primitives

Kober, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany, August 2008 (diplomathesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]