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2004


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Learning from demonstration and adaptation of biped locomotion

Nakanishi, J., Morimoto, J., Endo, G., Cheng, G., Schaal, S., Kawato, M.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 47(2-3):79-91, 2004, clmc (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we introduce a framework for learning biped locomotion using dynamical movement primitives based on non-linear oscillators. Our ultimate goal is to establish a design principle of a controller in order to achieve natural human-like locomotion. We suggest dynamical movement primitives as a central pattern generator (CPG) of a biped robot, an approach we have previously proposed for learning and encoding complex human movements. Demonstrated trajectories are learned through movement primitives by locally weighted regression, and the frequency of the learned trajectories is adjusted automatically by a novel frequency adaptation algorithmbased on phase resetting and entrainment of coupled oscillators. Numerical simulations and experimental implementation on a physical robot demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed locomotioncontroller.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

2004


link (url) [BibTex]


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Critical sizes for ferromagnetic spherical hollow nanoparticles

Goll, D., Berkowitz, A. E., Bertram, H. N.

{Physical Review B}, 70(18), 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Grain boundary wetting by a solid phase; microstructural development in a Zn-5 wt\textpercent Al alloy

Lopez, G. A., Mittemeijer, E. J., Straumal, B. B.

{Acta Materialia}, 52(15):4537-4545, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Electronic correlations, magnetism, and structure of Fe-Al subsystems: An LDA+U study

Lechermann, F., Fähnle, M., Meyer, B., Elsässer, C.

{Physical Review B}, 69, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Interaction of hydrogen isotopes with carbon nanostructures

Haluska, M., Hirscher, M., Becher, M., Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U., Chen, X., Roth, S.

{Materials Science and Engineering B}, 108, pages: 130-133, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Formation of nanograined structure and decomposition of supersaturated solid solution during high pressure torsion of Al-Zn and Al-Mg alloys

Straumal, B. B., Baretzky, B., Mazilkin, A. A., Phillipp, F., Kogtenkova, O. A., Volkov, M. N., Valiev, R. Z.

{Acta Materialia}, 52, pages: 4469-4478, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Ab-initio modeling of nonlinear magnetoelastic coupling in epitaxial films

Komelj, M., Fähnle, M.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 272-276, pages: e1587-e1588, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Atomic force microscope probe based controlled pushing for nanotribological characterization

Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME Transactions on mechatronics, 9(2):343-349, IEEE, 2004 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Effective exchange interaction in a quasi-two-dimensional self-assembled nanoparticle array

Wiedwald, U., Cerchez, M., Farle, M., Fauth, K., Schütz, G., Zürn, K., Boyen, H., Ziemann, P.

{Physical Review B}, 70, 2004 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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How well does total electron yield measure x-ray absorption in nanoparticles?

Fauth, K.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 85(15):3271-3273, 2004 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ordering and magnetism in Fe-Co: Dense sequence of ground-state structures

Drautz, R., Diaz-Ortiz, A., Fähnle, M., Dosch, H.

{Physical Review Letters}, 93(6), 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Thermal reversal of elongated ferromagnetic particles misoriented to the applied field

Goll, D., Bertram, H. N.

{IEEE Transactions on Magnetics}, 40(4):2416-2418, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Anisotropy of the orbital moments and the magnetic dipole term Tz in CrO2: An ab-initio study

Komelj, M., Ederer, C., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 69, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles: magnetic properties and interactions

Theil-Kuhn, L., Bojesen, A., Timmermann, L., Fauth, K., Goering, E. J., Johnson, E., Meedom Nielsen, M., Morup, S.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 272-276, pages: 1485-1486, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Measurement of very low bulk concentrations (below 1 atppm) of hydrogen using ERDA

Tripathi, A., Kruse, O., Carstanjen, H. D.

{Nuclear Instruments and Methods B}, 219-220, pages: 435-439, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Unusual doublet structure in proton magnetic-resonance spectra of yttrium and lutetium trihydrides

Majer, G., Telfah, A., Grinberg, F., Barnes, R. G.

{Physical Review B}, 70(13), 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kinetics of primary nanocrystallization in Al-rich metallic glass with quenched-in nuclei

Wang, J. Q., Zhang, H. W., Gu, X. J., Lu, K., Sommer, F., Mittemeijer, E.

{Materials Science and Engineering A}, 375-377, pages: 980-984, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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3-dimensional Wulff diagrams for \Sigma3 grain boundaries in Cu

Straumal, B., Kucherinenko, Y., Baretzky, B.

{Reviews on Advanced Materials Science}, 7(1):23-31, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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First-principles study of the interplay between magnetism and phase equilibria in Fe-Co systems

Diaz-Ortiz, A., Drautz, R., Fähnle, M., Dosch, H.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 272-276, pages: 780-782, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Magnetic field optimization of permanent magnet unulators for arbitrary polarization

Bahrdt, J., Frentrup, W., Gaupp, A., Scheer, M., Englisch, U.

{Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A}, 516, pages: 575-585, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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High-resolution imaging of fast magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures

Stoll, H., Puzic, A., Van Waeyenberge, B., Fischer, P., Raabe, J., Buess, M., Haug, T., Höllinger, R., Back, C., Weiss, D., Denbeaux, G.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 84, pages: 3328-3330, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Comparison of low-temperature magnetic relaxations in two systems GdAl2Dx (C15 Laves phase) and Fe3O4 (Inverse spinel)

Walz, F., Reule, H., Hirscher, M., Kronmüller, H.

{Physica Status Solidi B}, 241(2):389-400, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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General relations between many-body potentials and cluster expansions in multi-component systems

Drautz, R., Fähnle, M., Sanchez, J.M.

{Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter}, 16, pages: 3843-3852, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Counting individual atom layers in graphite - high-resolution RBS experiments on HOPG (highly ordered pyrolytic graphite)

Srivastava, S. K., Plachke, D., Szökefalvi-Nagy, A., Major, J., Carstanjen, H. D.

{Nuclear Instruments and Methods B}, 219-220, pages: 364-368, 2004 (article)

Abstract
{The paper reports about recent experiments on HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) by high-resolution RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy). By using an ion beam of 1 MeV N+ up to 7 individual monolayers could be identified in the RBS spectrum from such a sample. This is about twice as much as observed by other groups up to now. Since close to the surface the RBS peaks from the individual carbon layers are well separated, various quantities important for the ion-solid interaction can be determined with high precision, such as the stopping power of 1 MeV N ions in graphite and their energy straggling. Close to the surface the RBS peaks are asymmetric which is well explained in the framework of the Landau theory of energy straggling.}

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Feedback error learning and nonlinear adaptive control

Nakanishi, J., Schaal, S.

Neural Networks, 17(10):1453-1465, 2004, clmc (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we present our theoretical investigations of the technique of feedback error learning (FEL) from the viewpoint of adaptive control. We first discuss the relationship between FEL and nonlinear adaptive control with adaptive feedback linearization, and show that FEL can be interpreted as a form of nonlinear adaptive control. Second, we present a Lyapunov analysis suggesting that the condition of strictly positive realness (SPR) associated with the tracking error dynamics is a sufficient condition for asymptotic stability of the closed-loop dynamics. Specifically, for a class of second order SISO systems, we show that this condition reduces to KD^2 > KP; where KP and KD are positive position and velocity feedback gains, respectively. Moreover, we provide a ÔpassivityÕ-based stability analysis which suggests that SPR of the tracking error dynamics is a necessary and sufficient condition for asymptotic hyperstability. Thus, the condition KD^2>KP mentioned above is not only a sufficient but also necessary condition to guarantee asymptotic hyperstability of FEL, i.e. the tracking error is bounded and asymptotically converges to zero. As a further point, we explore the adaptive control and FEL framework for feedforward control formulations, and derive an additional sufficient condition for asymptotic stability in the sense of Lyapunov. Finally, we present numerical simulations to illustrate the stability properties of FEL obtained from our mathematical analysis.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Computational approaches to motor learning by imitation

Schaal, S., Ijspeert, A., Billard, A.

In The Neuroscience of Social Interaction, (1431):199-218, (Editors: Frith, C. D.;Wolpert, D.), Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2004, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
Movement imitation requires a complex set of mechanisms that map an observed movement of a teacher onto one's own movement apparatus. Relevant problems include movement recognition, pose estimation, pose tracking, body correspondence, coordinate transformation from external to egocentric space, matching of observed against previously learned movement, resolution of redundant degrees-of-freedom that are unconstrained by the observation, suitable movement representations for imitation, modularization of motor control, etc. All of these topics by themselves are active research problems in computational and neurobiological sciences, such that their combination into a complete imitation system remains a daunting undertaking - indeed, one could argue that we need to understand the complete perception-action loop. As a strategy to untangle the complexity of imitation, this paper will examine imitation purely from a computational point of view, i.e. we will review statistical and mathematical approaches that have been suggested for tackling parts of the imitation problem, and discuss their merits, disadvantages and underlying principles. Given the focus on action recognition of other contributions in this special issue, this paper will primarily emphasize the motor side of imitation, assuming that a perceptual system has already identified important features of a demonstrated movement and created their corresponding spatial information. Based on the formalization of motor control in terms of control policies and their associated performance criteria, useful taxonomies of imitation learning can be generated that clarify different approaches and future research directions.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Micromagnetism and the microstructure of high-temperature permanent magnets

Goll, D., Kronmüller, H., Stadelmaier, H. H.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 96(11):6534-6545, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Atomic defects and diffusion in intermetallic compounds with DO3 structure: An ab-initio study

Fähnle, M., Schimmele, L.

{Zeitschrift f\"ur Metallkunde}, 95, pages: 864-869, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Cluster surface interactions: Small Fe clusters driven nonmagnetic on graphite

Fauth, K., Gold, S., He\ssler, M., Schütz, G.

{Chemical Physics Letters}, 392(4-6):498-502, 2004 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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\textquotesingleWetting by solid state’grain boundary phase transition in Zn-Al alloys

Straumal, B. B., Khruzhcheva, A. S., Lopez, G. A.

{Reviews on Advanced Materials Science}, 7(1):13-22, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Two prototypes of metal adatom configurations on Mo(112): an ab initio study for Li and Co

Singer, R., Drautz, R., Fähnle, M.

{Surface Science}, 559, pages: 241-248, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Grain boundary phase transitions and their influence on properties of polycrystals

Straumal, B., Baretzky, B.

{Interface Science}, 12(2-3):147-155, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Swift heavy ion induced modification of Si/C60 multilayers

Srivastava, S. K., Kabiraj, D., Schattat, B., Carstanjen, H. D., Avasthi, D. K.

{Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B}, 219 - 220, pages: 815-819, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Static displacements of Pd in the solid solution PdBy (0\textlessy\textless0.2) as determined by neutron diffraction

Berger, T. G., Leineweber, A., Mittemeijer, E. J., Fischer, P.

{Physica Status Solidi (A)}, 201, pages: 1484-1492, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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X-MCD magnetometry of CMR perovskites La0.67-yREyCa0.33MnO3

Sikora, M., Kapusta, C., Zajac, D., Tokarz, W., Oates, C. J., Borowiec, M., Rybicki, D., Goering, E. J., Fischer, P., Schütz, G., De Teresa, J. M., Ibarra, M. R.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 272-276, pages: 2148-2150, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Critical thicknesses of domain formations in cubic particles and thin films

Kronmüller, H., Goll, D., Hertel, R., Schütz, G.

{Physica B}, 343(1-4):229-235, 2004 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Effect of Grain Boundary Phase Transitions on the Superplasticity in the Al-Zn System

Lopez, G.A., Straumal, B.B., Gust, W., Mittemeijer, E.J.

In Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation, pages: 642-647, Wiley-VCH Verlag, Weinheim, 2004 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2002


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Surface-slant-from-texture discrimination: Effects of slant level and texture type

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):300, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The problem of surface-slant-from-texture was studied psychophysically by measuring the performances of five human subjects in a slant-discrimination task with a number of different types of textures: uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, polka dots, Voronoi tessellations, orthogonal sinusoidal plaid patterns, fractal or 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a “diffusion-based” texture (leopard skin-like). The results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) A “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular slant characterized by a psychometric function that is steeper in the direction of the more slanted orientation. (3) For sufficiently large slants (66 deg) there are no major differences in performance between any of the different textures. (4) For slants at 26, 37 and 53 degrees, however, there are marked differences between the different textures. (5) The observed differences in performance across textures for slants up to 53 degrees are systematic within subjects, and nearly so across them. This allows a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness” — that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the surface. Polka dots tended to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst up to the large slant of 66 degrees at which performance was almost independent of the particular texture chosen. Finally, our large number of 2AFC trials (approximately 2800 trials per texture across subjects) and associated tight confidence intervals may enable us to find out about which statistical properties of the textures could be responsible for surface-slant-from-texture estimation, with the ultimate goal of being able to predict observer performance for any arbitrary texture.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2002


Web DOI [BibTex]


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Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision

Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 2(10):7, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast, the results of which allow different models of contrast processing (e.g. energy versus gain-control models) to be critically assessed (Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Studies of detection and discrimination using pulse train stimuli in noise, on the other hand, make predictions about the number, position and properties of noise sources within the processing stream (Henning, Bird & Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results combining data from both sinusoidal and pulse train experiments in and without noise to arrive at a more tightly constrained model of early spatial vision.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Pulse train detection and discrimination in pink noise

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):229, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on the display was measured and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband "pink" noise, designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train, made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. In contrast, a 2.09-c/deg "super train," constructed to have 8 equally detectable harmonics, was a factor of five more detectable than any of its components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Constructing Boosting algorithms from SVMs: an application to one-class classification.

Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24(9):1184-1199, September 2002 (article)

Abstract
We show via an equivalence of mathematical programs that a support vector (SV) algorithm can be translated into an equivalent boosting-like algorithm and vice versa. We exemplify this translation procedure for a new algorithm—one-class leveraging—starting from the one-class support vector machine (1-SVM). This is a first step toward unsupervised learning in a boosting framework. Building on so-called barrier methods known from the theory of constrained optimization, it returns a function, written as a convex combination of base hypotheses, that characterizes whether a given test point is likely to have been generated from the distribution underlying the training data. Simulations on one-class classification problems demonstrate the usefulness of our approach.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Phase information in the recognition of natural images

Braun, D., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

Perception, 31(ECVP Abstract Supplement):133, 25th European Conference on Visual Perception, August 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Fourier phase plays an important role in determining global image structure. For example, when the phase spectrum of an image of a flower is swapped with that of a tank, we usually perceive a tank, even though the amplitude spectrum is still that of the flower. Similarly, when the phase spectrum of an image is randomly swapped across frequencies, that is its Fourier energy is randomly distributed over the image, the resulting image becomes impossible to recognise. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of phase manipulations in a quantitative manner. Subjects viewed two images of natural scenes, one of which contained an animal (the target) embedded in the background. The spectra of the images were manipulated by adding random phase noise at each frequency. The phase noise was the independent variable, uniformly distributed between 0° and ±180°. Subjects were remarkably resistant to phase noise. Even with ±120° noise, subjects were still 75% correct. The proportion of correct answers closely followed the correlation between original and noise-distorted images. Thus it appears as if it was not the global phase information per se that determines our percept of natural images, but rather the effect of phase on local image features.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Forward models in visuomotor control

Mehta, B., Schaal, S.

J Neurophysiol, 88(2):942-53, August 2002, clmc (article)

Abstract
In recent years, an increasing number of research projects investigated whether the central nervous system employs internal models in motor control. While inverse models in the control loop can be identified more readily in both motor behavior and the firing of single neurons, providing direct evidence for the existence of forward models is more complicated. In this paper, we will discuss such an identification of forward models in the context of the visuomotor control of an unstable dynamic system, the balancing of a pole on a finger. Pole balancing imposes stringent constraints on the biological controller, as it needs to cope with the large delays of visual information processing while keeping the pole at an unstable equilibrium. We hypothesize various model-based and non-model-based control schemes of how visuomotor control can be accomplished in this task, including Smith Predictors, predictors with Kalman filters, tapped-delay line control, and delay-uncompensated control. Behavioral experiments with human participants allow exclusion of most of the hypothesized control schemes. In the end, our data support the existence of a forward model in the sensory preprocessing loop of control. As an important part of our research, we will provide a discussion of when and how forward models can be identified and also the possible pitfalls in the search for forward models in control.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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The contributions of color to recognition memory for natural scenes

Wichmann, F., Sharpe, L., Gegenfurtner, K.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 28(3):509-520, May 2002 (article)

Abstract
The authors used a recognition memory paradigm to assess the influence of color information on visual memory for images of natural scenes. Subjects performed 5-10% better for colored than for black-and-white images independent of exposure duration. Experiment 2 indicated little influence of contrast once the images were suprathreshold, and Experiment 3 revealed that performance worsened when images were presented in color and tested in black and white, or vice versa, leading to the conclusion that the surface property color is part of the memory representation. Experiments 4 and 5 exclude the possibility that the superior recognition memory for colored images results solely from attentional factors or saliency. Finally, the recognition memory advantage disappears for falsely colored images of natural scenes: The improvement in recognition memory depends on the color congruence of presented images with learned knowledge about the color gamut found within natural scenes. The results can be accounted for within a multiple memory systems framework.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Detection and discrimination in pink noise

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

5, pages: 100, 5. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about early spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli, which are not, perhaps, particularly "natural" stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast whilst keeping the number of unknown parameters comparatively small. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on our display was measured using a high-performance digital camera (Photometrics) and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband 1-D "pink" noise made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Training invariant support vector machines

DeCoste, D., Schölkopf, B.

Machine Learning, 46(1-3):161-190, January 2002 (article)

Abstract
Practical experience has shown that in order to obtain the best possible performance, prior knowledge about invariances of a classification problem at hand ought to be incorporated into the training procedure. We describe and review all known methods for doing so in support vector machines, provide experimental results, and discuss their respective merits. One of the significant new results reported in this work is our recent achievement of the lowest reported test error on the well-known MNIST digit recognition benchmark task, with SVM training times that are also significantly faster than previous SVM methods.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination with sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequency

Bird, C., Henning, G., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19(7), pages: 1267-1273, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The detectability of contrast increments was measured as a function of the contrast of a masking or “pedestal” grating at a number of different spatial frequencies ranging from 2 to 16 cycles per degree of visual angle. The pedestal grating always had the same orientation, spatial frequency and phase as the signal. The shape of the contrast increment threshold versus pedestal contrast (TvC) functions depend of the performance level used to define the “threshold,” but when both axes are normalized by the contrast corresponding to 75% correct detection at each frequency, the (TvC) functions at a given performance level are identical. Confidence intervals on the slope of the rising part of the TvC functions are so wide that it is not possible with our data to reject Weber’s Law.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]