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2009


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Nonlinear directed acyclic structure learning with weakly additive noise models

Tillman, R., Gretton, A., Spirtes, P.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 1847-1855, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The recently proposed emph{additive noise model} has advantages over previous structure learning algorithms, when attempting to recover some true data generating mechanism, since it (i) does not assume linearity or Gaussianity and (ii) can recover a unique DAG rather than an equivalence class. However, its original extension to the multivariate case required enumerating all possible DAGs, and for some special distributions, e.g. linear Gaussian, the model is invertible and thus cannot be used for structure learning. We present a new approach which combines a PC style search using recent advances in kernel measures of conditional dependence with local searches for additive noise models in substructures of the equivalence class. This results in a more computationally efficient approach that is useful for arbitrary distributions even when additive noise models are invertible. Experiments with synthetic and real data show that this method is more accurate than previous methods when data are nonlinear and/or non-Gaussian.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2009


PDF Web [BibTex]


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Graphical models for decoding in BCI visual speller systems

Martens, S., Farquhar, J., Hill, J., Schölkopf, B.

In pages: 470-473, IEEE, 4th International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER), 2009 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Fast, Consistent Kernel Two-Sample Test

Gretton, A., Fukumizu, K., Harchaoui, Z., Sriperumbudur, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 673-681, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A kernel embedding of probability distributions into reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS) has recently been proposed, which allows the comparison of two probability measures P and Q based on the distance between their respective embeddings: for a sufficiently rich RKHS, this distance is zero if and only if P and Q coincide. In using this distance as a statistic for a test of whether two samples are from different distributions, a major difficulty arises in computing the significance threshold, since the empirical statistic has as its null distribution (where P = Q) an infinite weighted sum of x2 random variables. Prior finite sample approximations to the null distribution include using bootstrap resampling, which yields a consistent estimate but is computationally costly; and fitting a parametric model with the low order moments of the test statistic, which can work well in practice but has no consistency or accuracy guarantees. The main result of the present work is a novel estimate of the null distribution, computed from the eigenspectrum of the Gram matrix on the aggregate sample from P and Q, and having lower computational cost than the bootstrap. A proof of consistency of this estimate is provided. The performance of the null distribution estimate is compared with the bootstrap and parametric approaches on an artificial example, high dimensional multivariate data, and text.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Augmenting Feature-driven fMRI Analyses: Semi-supervised learning and resting state activity

Blaschko, M., Shelton, J., Bartels, A.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 126-134, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Resting state activity is brain activation that arises in the absence of any task, and is usually measured in awake subjects during prolonged fMRI scanning sessions where the only instruction given is to close the eyes and do nothing. It has been recognized in recent years that resting state activity is implicated in a wide variety of brain function. While certain networks of brain areas have different levels of activation at rest and during a task, there is nevertheless significant similarity between activations in the two cases. This suggests that recordings of resting state activity can be used as a source of unlabeled data to augment discriminative regression techniques in a semi-supervised setting. We evaluate this setting empirically yielding three main results: (i) regression tends to be improved by the use of Laplacian regularization even when no additional unlabeled data are available, (ii) resting state data seem to have a similar marginal distribution to that recorded during the execution of a visual processing task implying largely similar types of activation, and (iii) this source of information can be broadly exploited to improve the robustness of empirical inference in fMRI studies, an inherently data poor domain.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Non-linear System Identification: Visual Saliency Inferred from Eye-Movement Data

Wichmann, F., Kienzle, W., Schölkopf, B., Franz, M.

Journal of Vision, 9(8):article 32, 2009 (article)

Abstract
For simple visual patterns under the experimenter's control we impose which information, or features, an observer can use to solve a given perceptual task. For natural vision tasks, however, there are typically a multitude of potential features in a given visual scene which the visual system may be exploiting when analyzing it: edges, corners, contours, etc. Here we describe a novel non-linear system identification technique based on modern machine learning methods that allows the critical features an observer uses to be inferred directly from the observer's data. The method neither requires stimuli to be embedded in noise nor is it limited to linear perceptive fields (classification images). We demonstrate our technique by deriving the critical image features observers fixate in natural scenes (bottom-up visual saliency). Unlike previous studies where the relevant structure is determined manually—e.g. by selecting Gabors as visual filters—we do not make any assumptions in this regard, but numerically infer number and properties them from the eye-movement data. We show that center-surround patterns emerge as the optimal solution for predicting saccade targets from local image structure. The resulting model, a one-layer feed-forward network with contrast gain-control, is surprisingly simple compared to previously suggested saliency models. Nevertheless, our model is equally predictive. Furthermore, our findings are consistent with neurophysiological hardware in the superior colliculus. Bottom-up visual saliency may thus not be computed cortically as has been thought previously.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]


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mGene.web: a web service for accurate computational gene finding

Schweikert, G., Behr, J., Zien, A., Zeller, G., Ong, C., Sonnenburg, S., Rätsch, G.

Nucleic Acids Research, 37, pages: W312-6, 2009 (article)

Abstract
We describe mGene.web, a web service for the genome-wide prediction of protein coding genes from eukaryotic DNA sequences. It offers pre-trained models for the recognition of gene structures including untranslated regions in an increasing number of organisms. With mGene.web, users have the additional possibility to train the system with their own data for other organisms on the push of a button, a functionality that will greatly accelerate the annotation of newly sequenced genomes. The system is built in a highly modular way, such that individual components of the framework, like the promoter prediction tool or the splice site predictor, can be used autonomously. The underlying gene finding system mGene is based on discriminative machine learning techniques and its high accuracy has been demonstrated in an international competition on nematode genomes. mGene.web is available at http://www.mgene.org/web, it is free of charge and can be used for eukaryotic genomes of small to moderate size (several hundred Mbp).

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Fast subtree kernels on graphs

Shervashidze, N., Borgwardt, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 22, pages: 1660-1668, (Editors: Bengio, Y. , D. Schuurmans, J. Lafferty, C. Williams, A. Culotta), Curran, Red Hook, NY, USA, 23rd Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2009 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this article, we propose fast subtree kernels on graphs. On graphs with n nodes and m edges and maximum degree d, these kernels comparing subtrees of height h can be computed in O(mh), whereas the classic subtree kernel by Ramon & G{\"a}rtner scales as O(n24dh). Key to this efficiency is the observation that the Weisfeiler-Lehman test of isomorphism from graph theory elegantly computes a subtree kernel as a byproduct. Our fast subtree kernels can deal with labeled graphs, scale up easily to large graphs and outperform state-of-the-art graph kernels on several classification benchmark datasets in terms of accuracy and runtime.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Full phase and amplitude control in computer-generated holography

Fratz, M., Fischer, P., Giel, D. M.

OPTICS LETTERS, 34(23):3659-3661, 2009 (article)

Abstract
We report what we believe to be the first realization of a computer-generated complex-valued hologram recorded in a single film of photoactive polymer. Complex-valued holograms give rise to a diffracted optical field with control over its amplitude and phase. The holograms are generated by a one-step direct laser writing process in which a spatial light modulator (SLM) is imaged onto a polymer film. Temporal modulation of the SLM during exposure controls both the strength of the induced birefringence and the orientation of the fast axis. We demonstrate that complex holograms can be used to impart arbitrary amplitude and phase profiles onto a beam and thereby open new possibilities in the control of optical beams. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America

pf

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Digital polarization holograms with defined magnitude and orientation of each pixel’s birefringence

Fratz, M., Giel, D. M., Fischer, P.

OPTICS LETTERS, 34(8):1270-1272, 2009 (article)

Abstract
A new form of digital polarization holography is demonstrated that permits both the amplitude and the phase of a diffracted beam to be independently controlled. This permits two independent intensity images to be stored in the same hologram. To fabricate the holograms, a birefringence with defined retardance and orientation of the fast axis is recorded into a photopolymer film. The holograms are selectively read out by choosing the polarization state of the read beam. Polarization holograms of this kind increase the data density in holographic data storage and allow higher quality diffractive optical elements to be written. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America

pf

[BibTex]


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Controlled Propulsion of Artificial Magnetic Nanostructured Propellers

Ghosh, A., Fischer, P.

NANO LETTERS, 9(6):2243-2245, 2009, Featured highlight ‘Nanotechnology: The helix that delivers’ Nature 459, 13 (2009). (article)

Abstract
For biomedical applications, such as targeted drug delivery and microsurgery, it is essential to develop a system of swimmers that can be propelled wirelessly in fluidic environments with good control. Here, we report the construction and operation of chiral colloidal propellers that can be navigated in water with micrometer-level precision using homogeneous magnetic fields. The propellers are made via nanostructured surfaces and can be produced in large numbers. The nanopropellers can carry chemicals, push loads, and act as local probes in rheological measurements.

Featured highlight ‘Nanotechnology: The helix that delivers’ Nature 459, 13 (2009).

pf

Video - Nanospropellers DOI [BibTex]

Video - Nanospropellers DOI [BibTex]


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Absolute Asymmetric Reduction Based on the Relative Orientation of Achiral Reactants

Kuhn, A., Fischer, P.

ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION, 48(37):6857-6860, 2009 (article)

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic mobile micro-robots

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

7eme Journees Nationales de la Recherche en Robotique, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Gecko-Inspired Directional and Controllable Adhesion

Murphy, M. P., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Small, 5(2):170-175, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Multiple magnetic microrobot control using electrostatic anchoring

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 94(16):164108, AIP, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Characterization of bacterial actuation of micro-objects

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 1022-1027, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Wet self-cleaning of biologically inspired elastomer mushroom shaped microfibrillar adhesives

Kim, S., Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(13):7196-7199, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Compliant footpad design analysis for a bio-inspired quadruped amphibious robot

Park, H. S., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 645-651, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Path integral-based stochastic optimal control for rigid body dynamics

Theodorou, E. A., Buchli, J., Schaal, S.

In Adaptive Dynamic Programming and Reinforcement Learning, 2009. ADPRL ’09. IEEE Symposium on, pages: 219-225, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recent advances on path integral stochastic optimal control [1],[2] provide new insights in the optimal control of nonlinear stochastic systems which are linear in the controls, with state independent and time invariant control transition matrix. Under these assumptions, the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation is formulated and linearized with the use of the logarithmic transformation of the optimal value function. The resulting HJB is a linear second order partial differential equation which is solved by an approximation based on the Feynman-Kac formula [3]. In this work we review the theory of path integral control and derive the linearized HJB equation for systems with state dependent control transition matrix. In addition we derive the path integral formulation for the general class of systems with state dimensionality that is higher than the dimensionality of the controls. Furthermore, by means of a modified inverse dynamics controller, we apply path integral stochastic optimal control over the new control space. Simulations illustrate the theoretical results. Future developments and extensions are discussed.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning locomotion over rough terrain using terrain templates

Kalakrishnan, M., Buchli, J., Pastor, P., Schaal, S.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 167-172, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We address the problem of foothold selection in robotic legged locomotion over very rough terrain. The difficulty of the problem we address here is comparable to that of human rock-climbing, where foot/hand-hold selection is one of the most critical aspects. Previous work in this domain typically involves defining a reward function over footholds as a weighted linear combination of terrain features. However, a significant amount of effort needs to be spent in designing these features in order to model more complex decision functions, and hand-tuning their weights is not a trivial task. We propose the use of terrain templates, which are discretized height maps of the terrain under a foothold on different length scales, as an alternative to manually designed features. We describe an algorithm that can simultaneously learn a small set of templates and a foothold ranking function using these templates, from expert-demonstrated footholds. Using the LittleDog quadruped robot, we experimentally show that the use of terrain templates can produce complex ranking functions with higher performance than standard terrain features, and improved generalization to unseen terrain.

am

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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One-dimensional phthalocyanine nanostructures directed by gold templates

Krauss, T. N., Barrena, E., Lohmüller, T., Kelsch, M., Breitling, A., Van Aken, P. A., Spatz, J., Dosch, H.

{Chemistry of Materials}, 21, pages: 5010-5015, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure microscopy of organic and magnetic materials

Ade, H., Stoll, H.

{Nature Materials}, 8, pages: 281-290, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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X-ray imaging of the dynamic magnetic vortex core deformation

Vansteenkiste, A., Chou, K. W., Weigand, M., Curcic, M., Sackmann, V., Stoll, H., Tyliszczak, T., Woltersdorf, G., Back, C. H., Schütz, G., Van Waeyenberge, B.

{Nature Physics}, 5, pages: 332-334, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Order\textendashdisorder transition and valence state of ytterbium in YbAuxGa2-x(0.26 \textless\textequalsx \textless\textequals1.31)

Gumeniuk, R., Bischoff, E., Burkhardt, U., Prots, Y., Schnelle, W., Vasylechko, L., Schmidt, M., Kuzma, Y., Grin, Y.

{Journal of Solid State Chemistry}, 182(12):3374-3382, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Coercivity of ledge-type L10-FePt/Fe nanocomposites with perpendicular magnetization

Goll, D., Breitling, A.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 94, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Time-resolved X-ray microscopy of nanoparticle aggregates under oscillatory shear

Auernhammer, G. K., Fauth, K., Ullrich, B., Zhao, J., Weigand, M., Vollmer, D.

{Journal of Synchrotron Radiation}, 16, pages: 307-309, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Micromagnetism of advanced hard magnetic materials

Kronmüller, H., Goll, D.

{International Journal of Materials Research}, 100, pages: 640-651, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Confinement of MgH2 nanoclusters within nanoporous aerogel scaffold materials

Nielsen, T. K., Manickam, K., Hirscher, M., Besenbacher, F., Jensen, T. R.

{American Chemical Society Nano}, 3(11):3521-3528, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Possible definition of atom- and bond-resolved contributions to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy

Subkow, S., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 80, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]


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Modelling the interplay of central pattern generation and sensory feedback in the neuromuscular control of running

Daley, M., Righetti, L., Ijspeert, A.

In Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology. Annual Main Meeting for the Society for Experimental Biology, 153, Glasgow, Scotland, 2009 (inproceedings)

mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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A novel artificial hair receptor based on aligned PVDF micro/nano fibers

Weiting, Liu, Bilsay, Sumer, Cesare, Stefanini, Arianna, Menciassi, Fei, Li, Dajing, Chen, Paolo, Dario, Metin, Sitti, Xin, Fu

In Robotics and Biomimetics, 2008. ROBIO 2008. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 49-54, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robot ceiling climbers harness new tricks

Marks, Paul

New Scientist, 202(2705):18-19, Reed Business Information, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Waalbot: Agile climbing with synthetic fibrillar dry adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 1599-1600, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Biologically-Inspired Patterned and Coated Adhesives for Medical Devices

Glass, P, Chung, H, Lee, C, Tworkoski, E, Washburn, NR, Sitti, M

Journal of Medical Devices, 3(2):027537, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Modeling and experimental characterization of an untethered magnetic micro-robot

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 28(8):1077-1094, Sage Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Towards automated nanoassembly with the atomic force microscope: A versatile drift compensation procedure

Krohs, F., Onal, C., Sitti, M., Fatikow, S.

Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, 131(6):061106, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Valero-Cuevas, F., Hoffmann, H., Kurse, M. U., Kutch, J. J., Theodorou, E. A.

IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering – (All authors have equally contributed), (2):110?135, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Computational models of the neuromuscular system hold the potential to allow us to reach a deeper understanding of neuromuscular function and clinical rehabilitation by complementing experimentation. By serving as a means to distill and explore specific hypotheses, computational models emerge from prior experimental data and motivate future experimental work. Here we review computational tools used to understand neuromuscular function including musculoskeletal modeling, machine learning, control theory, and statistical model analysis. We conclude that these tools, when used in combination, have the potential to further our understanding of neuromuscular function by serving as a rigorous means to test scientific hypotheses in ways that complement and leverage experimental data.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Compact models of motor primitive variations for predictible reaching and obstacle avoidance

Stulp, F., Oztop, E., Pastor, P., Beetz, M., Schaal, S.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2009), Paris, Dec.7-10, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
over and over again. This regularity allows humans and robots to reuse existing solutions for known recurring tasks. We expect that reusing a set of standard solutions to solve similar tasks will facilitate the design and on-line adaptation of the control systems of robots operating in human environments. In this paper, we derive a set of standard solutions for reaching behavior from human motion data. We also derive stereotypical reaching trajectories for variations of the task, in which obstacles are present. These stereotypical trajectories are then compactly represented with Dynamic Movement Primitives. On the humanoid robot Sarcos CB, this approach leads to reproducible, predictable, and human-like reaching motions.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Human optimization strategies under reward feedback

Hoffmann, H., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2009), Waikoloa, Hawaii, 2009, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Many hypothesis on human movement generation have been cast into an optimization framework, implying that movements are adapted to optimize a single quantity, like, e.g., jerk, end-point variance, or control cost. However, we still do not understand how humans actually learn when given only a cost or reward feedback at the end of a movement. Such a reinforcement learning setting has been extensively explored theoretically in engineering and computer science, but in human movement control, hardly any experiment studied movement learning under reward feedback. We present experiments probing which computational strategies humans use to optimize a movement under a continuous reward function. We present two experimental paradigms. The first paradigm mimics a ball-hitting task. Subjects (n=12) sat in front of a computer screen and moved a stylus on a tablet towards an unknown target. This target was located on a line that the subjects had to cross. During the movement, visual feedback was suppressed. After the movement, a reward was displayed graphically as a colored bar. As reward, we used a Gaussian function of the distance between the target location and the point of line crossing. We chose such a function since in sensorimotor tasks, the cost or loss function that humans seem to represent is close to an inverted Gaussian function (Koerding and Wolpert 2004). The second paradigm mimics pocket billiards. On the same experimental setup as above, the computer screen displayed a pocket (two bars), a white disk, and a green disk. The goal was to hit with the white disk the green disk (as in a billiard collision), such that the green disk moved into the pocket. Subjects (n=8) manipulated with the stylus the white disk to effectively choose start point and movement direction. Reward feedback was implicitly given as hitting or missing the pocket with the green disk. In both paradigms, subjects increased the average reward over trials. The surprising result was that in these experiments, humans seem to prefer a strategy that uses a reward-weighted average over previous movements instead of gradient ascent. The literature on reinforcement learning is dominated by gradient-ascent methods. However, our computer simulations and theoretical analysis revealed that reward-weighted averaging is the more robust choice given the amount of movement variance observed in humans. Apparently, humans choose an optimization strategy that is suitable for their own movement variance.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Adaptive Frequency Oscillators and Applications

Righetti, L., Buchli, J., Ijspeert, A.

The Open Cybernetics \& Systemics Journal, 3, pages: 64-69, 2009 (article)

Abstract
In this contribution we present a generic mechanism to transform an oscillator into an adaptive frequency oscillator, which can then dynamically adapt its parameters to learn the frequency of any periodic driving signal. Adaptation is done in a dynamic way: it is part of the dynamical system and not an offline process. This mechanism goes beyond entrainment since it works for any initial frequencies and the learned frequency stays encoded in the system even if the driving signal disappears. Interestingly, this mechanism can easily be applied to a large class of oscillators from harmonic oscillators to relaxation types and strange attractors. Several practical applications of this mechanism are then presented, ranging from adaptive control of compliant robots to frequency analysis of signals and construction of limit cycles of arbitrary shape.

mg

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Complex magnetic phase in submonolayer Fe stripes on Pt(977)

Honolka, J., Lee, T. Y., Kuhnke, K., Repetto, D., Sessi, V., Wahl, P., Buchsbaum, A., Varga, P., Gardonio, S., Carbone, C., Krishnakumar, S. R., Gambardella, P., Komelj, M., Singer, R., Fähnle, M., Fauth, K., Schütz, G., Enders, A., Kern, K.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Local and nonlocal atomic contributions to unit-cell damping in near-adiabatic collinear magnetization dynamics

Seib, J., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Temperature-dependent critical currents in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-δand ferromagnetic La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 hybrid structures

Djupmyr, M., Soltan, S., Habermeier, H.-U., Albrecht, J.

{Physical Review B}, 80, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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High surface area polyHIPEs with hierarchical pore system

Schwab, M. G., Senkovska, I., Rose, M., Klein, N., Koch, M., Pahnke, J., Jonschker, G., Schmitz, B., Hirscher, M., Kaskel, S.

{Soft Matter}, 5, pages: 1055-1059, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Grain boundary wetting phase transformations in the Zn-Sn and Zn-In systems

Gornakova, A. S., Straumal, B. B., Tsurekawa, S., Chang, L.-S., Nekrasov, A. N.

{Reviews on Advanced Materials Science}, 21(1):18-26, 2009 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Magnetization study of nanograined pure and Mn-doped ZnO films: formation of a ferromagnetic grain-boundary foam

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Myatiev, A. A., Straumal, P. B., Schütz, G., van Aken, P. A., Goering, E., Baretzky, B.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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In situ synthesis and hydrogen storage properties of PdNi alloy nanoparticles in an ordered mesoporous carbon template

Campesi, R., Cuevas, F., Leroy, E., Hirscher, M., Gadiou, R., Vix-Guterl, C., Latroche, M.

{Microporous and Mesoporous Materials}, 117, pages: 511-514, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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On-line learning and modulation of periodic movements with nonlinear dynamical systems

Gams, A., Ijspeert, A., Schaal, S., Lenarčič, J.

Autonomous Robots, 27(1):3-23, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Abstract  The paper presents a two-layered system for (1) learning and encoding a periodic signal without any knowledge on its frequency and waveform, and (2) modulating the learned periodic trajectory in response to external events. The system is used to learn periodic tasks on a humanoid HOAP-2 robot. The first layer of the system is a dynamical system responsible for extracting the fundamental frequency of the input signal, based on adaptive frequency oscillators. The second layer is a dynamical system responsible for learning of the waveform based on a built-in learning algorithm. By combining the two dynamical systems into one system we can rapidly teach new trajectories to robots without any knowledge of the frequency of the demonstration signal. The system extracts and learns only one period of the demonstration signal. Furthermore, the trajectories are robust to perturbations and can be modulated to cope with a dynamic environment. The system is computationally inexpensive, works on-line for any periodic signal, requires no additional signal processing to determine the frequency of the input signal and can be applied in parallel to multiple dimensions. Additionally, it can adapt to changes in frequency and shape, e.g. to non-stationary signals, such as hand-generated signals and human demonstrations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Local dimensionality reduction for non-parametric regression

Hoffman, H., Schaal, S., Vijayakumar, S.

Neural Processing Letters, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Locally-weighted regression is a computationally-efficient technique for non-linear regression. However, for high-dimensional data, this technique becomes numerically brittle and computationally too expensive if many local models need to be maintained simultaneously. Thus, local linear dimensionality reduction combined with locally-weighted regression seems to be a promising solution. In this context, we review linear dimensionality-reduction methods, compare their performance on nonparametric locally-linear regression, and discuss their ability to extend to incremental learning. The considered methods belong to the following three groups: (1) reducing dimensionality only on the input data, (2) modeling the joint input-output data distribution, and (3) optimizing the correlation between projection directions and output data. Group 1 contains principal component regression (PCR); group 2 contains principal component analysis (PCA) in joint input and output space, factor analysis, and probabilistic PCA; and group 3 contains reduced rank regression (RRR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression. Among the tested methods, only group 3 managed to achieve robust performance even for a non-optimal number of components (factors or projection directions). In contrast, group 1 and 2 failed for fewer components since these methods rely on the correct estimate of the true intrinsic dimensionality. In group 3, PLS is the only method for which a computationally-efficient incremental implementation exists. Thus, PLS appears to be ideally suited as a building block for a locally-weighted regressor in which projection directions are incrementally added on the fly.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Kim, S., Sitti, M.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(4):849-855, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]