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2017


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Understanding FORC using synthetic micro-structured systems with variable coupling- and coercivefield distributions

Groß, Felix

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2017 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]


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Corrosion-protected hybrid nanoparticles

Jeong, H., Alarcón-Correa, M., Mark, A. G., Son, K., Lee, T., Fischer, P.

{Advanced Science}, 4(12), Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Investigation of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and room temperature skyrmions in W/CoFeB/MgO thin films and microwires

Jaiswal, S., Litzius, K., Lemesh, I., Büttner, F., Finizio, S., Raabe, J., Weigand, M., Lee, K., Langer, J., Ocker, B., Jakob, G., Beach, G. S. D., Kläui, M.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 111(2), American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser pulses: Transfer of angular momentum from the electronic system to magnetoelastic spin-phonon modes

Fähnle, M., Tsatsoulis, T., Illg, C., Haag, M., Müller, B. Y., Zhang, L.

{Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism}, 30(5):1381-1387, Springer Science + Business Media B.V., New York, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic behavior of single chain magnets in metal organic frameworks CPO-27-Co

Son, K., Goering, E., Hirscher, M., Oh, H.

{Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology}, 17(10):7541-7546, American Scientific Publishers, Stevenson Ranch, Calif., 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Switching by domain-wall automotion in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings

Mawass, M., Richter, K., Bisig, A., Reeve, R. M., Krüger, B., Weigand, M., Stoll, H., Krone, A., Kronast, F., Schütz, G., Kläui, M.

{Physical Review Applied}, 7(4), American Physical Society, College Park, Md. [u.a.], 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A neutral atom moving in an external magnetic field does not feel a Lorentz force

Fähnle, M.

{American Journal of Modern Physics}, 6(6):153-155, Science Publishing Group, New York, NY, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Using FORC to understand the microstructure-micromagnetism relationship in supermagnets

Ilse, S. E.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2017 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Adsorption von Wasserstoffmolekülen in nanoporösen Gerüststrukturen

Kotzur, N.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2017 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Temperature-dependent first-order reversal curve measurements on unusually hard magnetic low-temperature phase of MnBi

Muralidhar, S., Gräfe, J., Chen, Y., Etter, M., Gregori, G., Ener, S., Sawatzki, S., Hono, K., Gutfleisch, O., Kronmüller, H., Schütz, G., Goering, E. J.

{Physical Review B}, 95(2), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Smooth and rapid microwave synthesis of MIL-53(Fe) including superparamagnetic \textlessgamma\textgreater-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

Wengert, S., Albrecht, J., Ruoß, S., Stahl, C., Schütz, G., Schäfer, R.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 444, pages: 168-172, NH, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Characterization and differentiation of rock varnish types from different environments by microanalytical techniques

Macholdt, D. S., Jochum, K. P., Pöhlker, C., Arangio, A., Förster, J., Stoll, B., Weis, U., Weber, B., Müller, M., Kappl, M., Shiraiwa, M., Kilcoyne, A. L. D., Weigand, M., Scholz, D., Haug, G. H., Al-Amri, A., Andreae, M. O.

{Chemical Geology}, 459, pages: 91-118, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Skyrmion Hall effect revealed by direct time-resolved X-ray microscopy

Litzius, K., Lemesh, I., Krüger, B., Bassirian, P., Caretta, L., Richter, K., Büttner, F., Sato, K., Tretiakov, O. A., Förster, J., Reeve, R. M., Weigand, M., Bykova, I., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Beach, G. S. D., Kläui, M.

{Nature Physics}, 13(2):170-175, Nature Pub. Group, London, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Comment on magnonic black holes

Fähnle, M., Schütz, G.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 444, pages: 146-146, NH, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Cr-Substitution in Ba2In2O5 \mbox⋅ (H2O)x (x \textequals 0.16, 0.74)

Yoon, S., Son, K., Hagemann, H., Widenmeyer, M., Weidenkaff, A.

{Solid State Sciences}, 73, pages: 1-6, Elsevier Masson SAS, Paris, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Exploiting diffusion barrier and chemical affinity of metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen isotope separation

Kim, J. Y., Balderas-Xicohténcatl, R., Zhang, L., Kang, S. G., Hirscher, M., Oh, H., Moon, H. R.

{Journal of the American Chemical Society}, 139(42):15135-15141, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Facile fabrication of mesoporous silica micro-jets with multi-functionalities

Vilela, D., Hortelao, A. C., Balderas-Xicohténcatl, R., Hirscher, M., Hahn, K., Ma, X., Sánchez, S.

{Nanoscale}, 9(37):13990-13997, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Comment on half-integer quantum numbers for the total angular momentum of photons in light beams with finite lateral extensions

Fähnle, M.

{American Journal of Modern Physics}, 6(5):88-90, Science Publishing Group, New York, NY, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Functionalised metal-organic frameworks: a novel approach to stabilising single metal atoms

Szilágyi, P. Á., Rogers, D. M., Zaiser, I., Callini, E., Turner, S., Borgschulte, A., Züttel, A., Geerlings, H., Hirscher, M., Dam, B.

{Journal of Materials Chemistry A}, 5(30):15559-15566, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Selective hydrogen isotope separation via breathing transition in MIL-53(Al)

Kim, J. Y., Zhang, L., Balderas-Xicohténcatl, R., Park, J., Hirscher, M., Moon, H. R., Oh, H.

{Journal of the American Chemical Society}, 139(49):17743-17746, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Advanced magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements of superconductors at low temperatures

Stahl, C., Gräfe, J., Ruoß, S., Zahn, P., Bayer, J., Simmendinger, J., Schütz, G., Albrecht, J.

{AIP Advances}, 7(10), 2017 (article)

mms

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Tailored magnetic properties of exchange-spring and ultra hard nanomagnets

Son, K.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2017 (phdthesis)

mms

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Efficient synthesis for large-scale production and characterization for hydrogen storage of ligand exchanged MOF-74/174/184-M (M\textequalsMg2+, Ni2+)

Oh, H., Maurer, S., Balderas-Xicohténcatl, R., Arnold, L., Magdysyuk, O. V., Schütz, G., Müller, U., Hirscher, M.

{International Journal of Hydrogen Energy}, 42(2):1027-1035, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Unifying ultrafast demagnetization and intrinsic Gilbert damping in Co/Ni bilayers with electronic relaxation near the Fermi surface

Zhang, W., He, W., Zhang, X.-Q., Cheng, Z.-H., Teng, J., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 96(22), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Influence of the skin barrier on the penetration of topically-applied dexamethasone probed by soft X-ray spectromicroscopy

Yamamoto, K., Klossek, A., Flesch, R., Rancan, F., Weigand, M., Bykova, I., Bechtel, M., Ahlberg, S., Vogt, A., Blume-Peytavi, U., Schrade, P., Bachmann, S., Hedtrich, S., Schäfer-Korting, M., Rühl, E.

{European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics}, 118, pages: 30-37, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes in a metal-organic framework with active Cu(I) sites

Weinrauch, I., Savchenko, I., Denysenko, D., Souliou, S. M., Kim, H., Le Tacon, M., Daemen, L. L., Cheng, Y., Mavrandonakis, A., Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J., Volkmer, D., Schütz, G., Hirscher, M., Heine, T.

{Nature Communications}, 8, Nature Publishing Group, London, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Multiscale simulations of topological transformations in magnetic-skyrmion spin structures

De Lucia, A., Litzius, K., Krüger, B., Tretiakov, O. A., Kläui, M.

{Physical Review B}, 96(2), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Unexpectedly marginal effect of electronic correlations on ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser-pulse excitation

Weng, W., Huang, Haonan, Briones Paz, J. Z., Teeny, N., Müller, B. Y., Haag, M., Kuhn, T., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 95(22), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Black manganese-rich crusts on a Gothic cathedral

Macholdt, D. S., Herrmann, S., Jochum, K. P., Kilcoyne, A. L. D., Laubscher, T., Pfisterer, H. K., Pöhlker, C., Schwager, B., Weber, B., Weigand, M., Domke, K. F., Andreae, M. O.

{Atmospheric Environment}, 171, pages: 205-220, Elsevier, Amsterdam [u.a.], 2017 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2016


Thumb xl nonlinear approximate vs exact
A New Perspective and Extension of the Gaussian Filter

Wüthrich, M., Trimpe, S., Garcia Cifuentes, C., Kappler, D., Schaal, S.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 35(14):1731-1749, December 2016 (article)

Abstract
The Gaussian Filter (GF) is one of the most widely used filtering algorithms; instances are the Extended Kalman Filter, the Unscented Kalman Filter and the Divided Difference Filter. The GF represents the belief of the current state by a Gaussian distribution, whose mean is an affine function of the measurement. We show that this representation can be too restrictive to accurately capture the dependences in systems with nonlinear observation models, and we investigate how the GF can be generalized to alleviate this problem. To this end, we view the GF as the solution to a constrained optimization problem. From this new perspective, the GF is seen as a special case of a much broader class of filters, obtained by relaxing the constraint on the form of the approximate posterior. On this basis, we outline some conditions which potential generalizations have to satisfy in order to maintain the computational efficiency of the GF. We propose one concrete generalization which corresponds to the standard GF using a pseudo measurement instead of the actual measurement. Extending an existing GF implementation in this manner is trivial. Nevertheless, we show that this small change can have a major impact on the estimation accuracy.

am ics

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2016


PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Wireless actuation with functional acoustic surfaces

Qiu, T., Palagi, S., Mark, A. G., Melde, K., Adams, F., Fischer, P.

Appl. Phys. Lett., 109(19):191602, November 2016, APL Editor's pick. APL News. (article)

Abstract
Miniaturization calls for micro-actuators that can be powered wirelessly and addressed individually. Here, we develop functional surfaces consisting of arrays of acoustically resonant microcavities, and we demonstrate their application as two-dimensional wireless actuators. When remotely powered by an acoustic field, the surfaces provide highly directional propulsive forces in fluids through acoustic streaming. A maximal force of similar to 0.45mN is measured on a 4 x 4 mm(2) functional surface. The response of the surfaces with bubbles of different sizes is characterized experimentally. This shows a marked peak around the micro-bubbles' resonance frequency, as estimated by both an analytical model and numerical simulations. The strong frequency dependence can be exploited to address different surfaces with different acoustic frequencies, thus achieving wireless actuation with multiple degrees of freedom. The use of the functional surfaces as wireless ready-to-attach actuators is demonstrated by implementing a wireless and bidirectional miniaturized rotary motor, which is 2.6 x 2.6 x 5 mm(3) in size and generates a stall torque of similar to 0.5 mN.mm. The adoption of micro-structured surfaces as wireless actuators opens new possibilities in the development of miniaturized devices and tools for fluidic environments that are accessible by low intensity ultrasound fields.

pf

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Bioengineered and biohybrid bacteria-based systems for drug delivery

Hosseinidoust, Z., Mostaghaci, B., Yasa, O., Park, B., Singh, A. V., Sitti, M.

Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 106, pages: 27-44, Elsevier, November 2016 (article)

Abstract
The use of bacterial cells as agents of medical therapy has a long history. Research that was ignited over a century ago with the accidental infection of cancer patients has matured into a platform technology that offers the promise of opening up new potential frontiers in medical treatment. Bacterial cells exhibit unique characteristics that make them well-suited as smart drug delivery agents. Our ability to genetically manipulate the molecular machinery of these cells enables the customization of their therapeutic action as well as its precise tuning and spatio-temporal control, allowing for the design of unique, complex therapeutic functions, unmatched by current drug delivery systems. Early results have been promising, but there are still many important challenges that must be addressed. We present a review of promises and challenges of employing bioengineered bacteria in drug delivery systems and introduce the biohybrid design concept as a new additional paradigm in bacteria-based drug delivery.

pi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Nanomotors

Alarcon-Correa, M., Walker (Schamel), D., Qiu, T., Fischer, P.

Eur. Phys. J.-Special Topics, 225(11-12):2241-2254, November 2016 (article)

Abstract
This minireview discusses whether catalytically active macromolecules and abiotic nanocolloids, that are smaller than motile bacteria, can self-propel. Kinematic reversibility at low Reynolds number demands that self-propelling colloids must break symmetry. Methods that permit the synthesis and fabrication of Janus nanocolloids are therefore briefly surveyed, as well as means that permit the analysis of the nanocolloids' motion. Finally, recent work is reviewed which shows that nanoagents are small enough to penetrate the complex inhomogeneous polymeric network of biological fluids and gels, which exhibit diverse rheological behaviors.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Creating body shapes from verbal descriptions by linking similarity spaces

Hill, M. Q., Streuber, S., Hahn, C. A., Black, M. J., O’Toole, A. J.

Psychological Science, 27(11):1486-1497, November 2016, (article)

Abstract
Brief verbal descriptions of bodies (e.g. curvy, long-legged) can elicit vivid mental images. The ease with which we create these mental images belies the complexity of three-dimensional body shapes. We explored the relationship between body shapes and body descriptions and show that a small number of words can be used to generate categorically accurate representations of three-dimensional bodies. The dimensions of body shape variation that emerged in a language-based similarity space were related to major dimensions of variation computed directly from three-dimensional laser scans of 2094 bodies. This allowed us to generate three-dimensional models of people in the shape space using only their coordinates on analogous dimensions in the language-based description space. Human descriptions of photographed bodies and their corresponding models matched closely. The natural mapping between the spaces illustrates the role of language as a concise code for body shape, capturing perceptually salient global and local body features.

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Structured light enables biomimetic swimming and versatile locomotion of photoresponsive soft microrobots

Palagi, S., Mark, A. G., Reigh, S. Y., Melde, K., Qiu, T., Zeng, H., Parmeggiani, C., Martella, D., Sanchez-Castillo, A., Kapernaum, N., Giesselmann, F., Wiersma, D. S., Lauga, E., Fischer, P.

Nature Materials, 15(6):647–653, November 2016, Max Planck press release, Nature News & Views. (article)

Abstract
Microorganisms move in challenging environments by periodic changes in body shape. In contrast, current artificial microrobots cannot actively deform, exhibiting at best passive bending under external fields. Here, by taking advantage of the wireless, scalable and spatiotemporally selective capabilities that light allows, we show that soft microrobots consisting of photoactive liquid-crystal elastomers can be driven by structured monochromatic light to perform sophisticated biomimetic motions. We realize continuum yet selectively addressable artificial microswimmers that generate travelling-wave motions to self-propel without external forces or torques, as well as microrobots capable of versatile locomotion behaviours on demand. Both theoretical predictions and experimental results confirm that multiple gaits, mimicking either symplectic or antiplectic metachrony of ciliate protozoa, can be achieved with single microswimmers. The principle of using structured light can be extended to other applications that require microscale actuation with sophisticated spatiotemporal coordination for advanced microrobotic technologies.

pf

Video - Soft photo Micro-Swimmer DOI [BibTex]

Video - Soft photo Micro-Swimmer DOI [BibTex]


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A 5-D localization method for a magnetically manipulated untethered robot using a 2-D array of Hall-effect sensors

Son, D., Yim, S., Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, 21(2):708-716, IEEE, October 2016 (article)

Abstract
This paper introduces a new five-dimensional localization method for an untethered meso-scale magnetic robot, which is manipulated by a computer-controlled electromagnetic system. The developed magnetic localization setup is a two-dimensional array of mono-axial Hall-effect sensors, which measure the perpendicular magnetic fields at their given positions. We introduce two steps for localizing a magnetic robot more accurately. First, the dipole modeled magnetic field of the electromagnet is subtracted from the measured data in order to determine the robot's magnetic field. Secondly, the subtracted magnetic field is twice differentiated in the perpendicular direction of the array, so that the effect of the electromagnetic field in the localization process is minimized. Five variables regarding the position and orientation of the robot are determined by minimizing the error between the measured magnetic field and the modeled magnetic field in an optimization method. The resulting position error is 2.1±0.8 mm and angular error is 6.7±4.3° within the applicable range (5 cm) of magnetic field sensors at 200 Hz. The proposed localization method would be used for the position feedback control of untethered magnetic devices or robots for medical applications in the future.

pi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl nn 2016 05545f 0007
High-Performance Multiresponsive Paper Actuators

Amjadi, M., Sitti, M.

ACS Nano, 10(11):10202-10210, American Chemical Society, October 2016 (article)

Abstract
There is an increasing demand for soft actuators because of their importance in soft robotics, artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, and beyond. However, the development of soft actuators capable of low-voltage operation, powerful actuation, and programmable shape-changing is still challenging. In this work, we propose programmable bilayer actuators that operate based on the large hygroscopic contraction of the copy paper and simultaneously large thermal expansion of the polypropylene film upon increasing the temperature. The electrothermally activated bending actuators can function with low voltages (≤ 8 V), low input electric power per area (P ≤ 0.14 W cm–2), and low temperature changes (≤ 35 °C). They exhibit reversible shape-changing behavior with curvature radii up to 1.07 cm–1 and bending angle of 360°, accompanied by powerful actuation. Besides the electrical activation, they can be powered by humidity or light irradiation. We finally demonstrate the use of our paper actuators as a soft gripper robot and a lightweight paper wing for aerial robotics.

pi

DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl publications toc
Programmable assembly of heterogeneous microparts by an untethered mobile capillary microgripper

Giltinan, J., Diller, E., Sitti, M.

Lab on a Chip, 16(22):4445-4457, Royal Society of Chemistry, October 2016 (article)

Abstract
At the sub-millimeter scale, capillary forces enable robust and reversible adhesion between biological organisms and varied substrates. Current human-engineered mobile untethered micromanipulation systems rely on forces which scale poorly or utilize gripper-part designs that promote manipulation. Capillary forces, alternatively, are dependent upon the surface chemistry (which is scale independent) and contact perimeter, which conforms to the part surface. We report a mobile capillary microgripper that is able to pick and place parts of various materials and geometries, and is thus ideal for microassembly tasks that cannot be accomplished by large tethered manipulators. We achieve the programmable assembly of sub-millimeter parts in an enclosed three-dimensional aqueous environment by creating a capillary bridge between the targeted part and a synthetic, untethered, mobile body. The parts include both hydrophilic and hydrophobic components: hydrogel, kapton, human hair, and biological tissue. The 200 μm untethered system can be controlled with five-degrees-of-freedom and advances progress towards autonomous desktop manufacturing for tissue engineering, complex micromachines, microfluidic devices, and meta-materials.

pi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl 5fc6a94719a2ed61820a6fd031f53c39682a1f157b1c10c35d5d4c88d087d90e
Composition-dependent underwater adhesion of catechol-bearing hydrogels

Wu, H., Sariola, V., Zhao, J., Ding, H., Sitti, M., Bettinger, C. J.

Polymer International, 65(11):1355-1359, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Interfacial adhesion-mediated transfer printing processes can integrate functional electronic microstructures with polymeric substrates that are bendable and stretchable. Transfer printing has also been extended to catechol-bearing adhesive hydrogels. This study presents indentation adhesion tests between catechol-bearing hydrogel substrates with catechol concentrations varying from 0 to 10% (mol/mol) and thin-film materials commonly used in microelectronic fabrication including polymers, noble metals and oxides. The results indicate that the interfacial adhesion of catechol-bearing hydrogels is positively correlated with the concentration of catechol-bearing monomers as well as the retraction velocity during transfer printing. This study can inform transfer printing processes for microfabricated structures to compliant hydrated substrates such as hygroscopic monomers, mesoporous polymer networks and hydrogels. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry

pi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl singh et al 2016 advanced healthcare materials
Bacteria-Driven Particles: Patterned and Specific Attachment of Bacteria on Biohybrid Bacteria-Driven Microswimmers (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 18/2016)

Singh, A. V., Sitti, M.

Advanced Healthcare Materials, 5(18):2306-2306, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
On page 2325, Ajay Vikram Singh and Metin Sitti propose a facile surface patterning technique and a specific, strong biotin–streptavidin bonding of bacteria on patterned surfaces to fabricate Janus particles that are propelled by the attached bacteria. Such bacteria-driven Janus microswimmers could be used for future medicine in targeted drug delivery and environmental remediation.

pi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Capture of 2D Microparticle Arrays via a UV-Triggered Thiol-yne “Click” Reaction

Walker (Schamel), D., Singh, D. P., Fischer, P.

Advanced Materials, 28(44):9846-9850, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Immobilization of colloidal assemblies onto solid supports via a fast UV-triggered click-reaction is achieved. Transient assemblies of microparticles and colloidal materials can be captured and transferred to solid supports. The technique does not require complex reaction conditions, and is compatible with a variety of particle assembly methods.

pf

DOI [BibTex]


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Contextual Policy Search for Linear and Nonlinear Generalization of a Humanoid Walking Controller

Abdolmaleki, A., Lau, N., Reis, L., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

Journal of Intelligent & Robotic Systems, 83(3-4):393-408, (Editors: Luis Almeida, Lino Marques ), September 2016, Special Issue: Autonomous Robot Systems (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnesium plasmonics for UV applications and chiral sensing

Jeong, H. H., Mark, A. G., Fischer, P.

Chem. Comm., 52(82):12179-12182, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate that chiral magnesium nanoparticles show remarkable plasmonic extinction- and chiroptical-effects in the ultraviolet region. The Mg nanohelices possess an enhanced local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensitivity due to the strong dispersion of most substances in the UV region.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl cover nature 1j 00008
Holograms for acoustics

Melde, K., Mark, A. G., Qiu, T., Fischer, P.

Nature, 537, pages: 518-522, September 2016, Max Planck press release, Nature News & Views, Nature Video. (article)

Abstract
Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays(1), high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical(2) or acoustic fields(3,4) within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront(5,6) in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography(7) skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources(3,4,8-12); however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

pf

Video - Holograms for Sound DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Video - Holograms for Sound DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A loop-gap resonator for chirality-sensitive nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER)

Garbacz, P., Fischer, P., Kraemer, S.

J. Chem. Phys., 145(10):104201, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Direct detection of molecular chirality is practically impossible by methods of standard nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that is based on interactions involving magnetic-dipole and magnetic-field operators. However, theoretical studies provide a possible direct probe of chirality by exploiting an enantiomer selective additional coupling involving magnetic-dipole, magnetic-field, and electric field operators. This offers a way for direct experimental detection of chirality by nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER). This method uses both resonant magnetic and electric radiofrequency (RF) fields. The weakness of the chiral interaction though requires a large electric RF field and a small transverse RF magnetic field over the sample volume, which is a non-trivial constraint. In this study, we present a detailed study of the NMER concept and a possible experimental realization based on a loop-gap resonator. For this original device, the basic principle and numerical studies as well as fabrication and measurements of the frequency dependence of the scattering parameter are reported. By simulating the NMER spin dynamics for our device and taking the F-19 NMER signal of enantiomer-pure 1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-ol, we predict a chirality induced NMER signal that accounts for 1%-5% of the standard achiral NMR signal. Published by AIP Publishing.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl publications toc
The effect of temperature and humidity on adhesion of a gecko-inspired adhesive: implications for the natural system

Stark, A. Y., Klittich, M. R., Sitti, M., Niewiarowski, P. H., Dhinojwala, A.

Scientific Reports, 6, pages: 30936, Nature Publishing Group, August 2016 (article)

Abstract
The adhesive system of geckos has inspired hundreds of synthetic adhesives. While this system has been used relentlessly as a source of inspiration, less work has been done in reverse, where synthetics are used to test questions and hypotheses about the natural system. Here we take such an approach. We tested shear adhesion of a mushroom-tipped synthetic gecko adhesive under conditions that produced perplexing results in the natural adhesive system. Synthetic samples were tested at two temperatures (12 °C and 32 °C) and four different humidity levels (30%, 55%, 70%, and 80% RH). Surprisingly, adhesive performance of the synthetic samples matched that of living geckos, suggesting that uncontrolled parameters in the natural system, such as surface chemistry and material changes, may not be as influential in whole-animal performance as previously thought. There was one difference, however, when comparing natural and synthetic adhesive performance. At 12 °C and 80% RH, adhesion of the synthetic structures was lower than expected based on the natural system’s performance. Our approach highlights a unique opportunity for both biologists and material scientists, where new questions and hypotheses can be fueled by joint comparisons of the natural and synthetic systems, ultimately improving knowledge of both.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Non-parametric Models for Structured Data and Applications to Human Bodies and Natural Scenes

Lehrmann, A.

ETH Zurich, July 2016 (phdthesis)

Abstract
The purpose of this thesis is the study of non-parametric models for structured data and their fields of application in computer vision. We aim at the development of context-sensitive architectures which are both expressive and efficient. Our focus is on directed graphical models, in particular Bayesian networks, where we combine the flexibility of non-parametric local distributions with the efficiency of a global topology with bounded treewidth. A bound on the treewidth is obtained by either constraining the maximum indegree of the underlying graph structure or by introducing determinism. The non-parametric distributions in the nodes of the graph are given by decision trees or kernel density estimators. The information flow implied by specific network topologies, especially the resultant (conditional) independencies, allows for a natural integration and control of contextual information. We distinguish between three different types of context: static, dynamic, and semantic. In four different approaches we propose models which exhibit varying combinations of these contextual properties and allow modeling of structured data in space, time, and hierarchies derived thereof. The generative character of the presented models enables a direct synthesis of plausible hypotheses. Extensive experiments validate the developed models in two application scenarios which are of particular interest in computer vision: human bodies and natural scenes. In the practical sections of this work we discuss both areas from different angles and show applications of our models to human pose, motion, and segmentation as well as object categorization and localization. Here, we benefit from the availability of modern datasets of unprecedented size and diversity. Comparisons to traditional approaches and state-of-the-art research on the basis of well-established evaluation criteria allows the objective assessment of our contributions.

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pdf [BibTex]


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Magnetic propulsion of robotic sperms at low-Reynolds number

Khalil, I. S., Fatih Tabak, A., Klingner, A., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 109(3):033701, AIP Publishing, July 2016 (article)

Abstract
We investigate the microswimming behaviour of robotic sperms in viscous fluids. These robotic sperms are fabricated from polystyrene dissolved in dimethyl formamide and iron-oxide nanoparticles. This composition allows the nanoparticles to be concentrated within the bead of the robotic sperm and provide magnetic dipole, whereas the flexibility of the ultra-thin tail enables flagellated locomotion using magnetic fields in millitesla range. We show that these robotic sperms have similar morphology and swimming behaviour to those of sperm cells. Moreover, we show experimentally that our robotic sperms swim controllably at an average speed of approximately one body length per second (around 125 μm s−1), and they are relatively faster than the microswimmers that depend on planar wave propulsion in low-Reynolds number fluids.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]