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2009


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Local dimensionality reduction for non-parametric regression

Hoffman, H., Schaal, S., Vijayakumar, S.

Neural Processing Letters, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Locally-weighted regression is a computationally-efficient technique for non-linear regression. However, for high-dimensional data, this technique becomes numerically brittle and computationally too expensive if many local models need to be maintained simultaneously. Thus, local linear dimensionality reduction combined with locally-weighted regression seems to be a promising solution. In this context, we review linear dimensionality-reduction methods, compare their performance on nonparametric locally-linear regression, and discuss their ability to extend to incremental learning. The considered methods belong to the following three groups: (1) reducing dimensionality only on the input data, (2) modeling the joint input-output data distribution, and (3) optimizing the correlation between projection directions and output data. Group 1 contains principal component regression (PCR); group 2 contains principal component analysis (PCA) in joint input and output space, factor analysis, and probabilistic PCA; and group 3 contains reduced rank regression (RRR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression. Among the tested methods, only group 3 managed to achieve robust performance even for a non-optimal number of components (factors or projection directions). In contrast, group 1 and 2 failed for fewer components since these methods rely on the correct estimate of the true intrinsic dimensionality. In group 3, PLS is the only method for which a computationally-efficient incremental implementation exists. Thus, PLS appears to be ideally suited as a building block for a locally-weighted regressor in which projection directions are incrementally added on the fly.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

2009


link (url) [BibTex]


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Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Kim, S., Sitti, M.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(4):849-855, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Miniature devices: Voyage of the microrobots

Sitti, M.

Nature, 458(7242):1121-1122, Nature Publishing Group, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dry spinning based spinneret based tunable engineered parameters (STEP) technique for controlled and aligned deposition of polymeric nanofibers

Nain, A. S., Sitti, M., Jacobson, A., Kowalewski, T., Amon, C.

Macromolecular rapid communications, 30(16):1406-1412, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Two-dimensional contact and noncontact micromanipulation in liquid using an untethered mobile magnetic microrobot

Floyd, S., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 25(6):1332-1342, IEEE, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Mit Röntgenblitzen zu neuen Erkenntnissen

Hedderich, R., Weigand, M., Baretzky, B.

{Nanotechnik - Molek\"ule Materialien Mikrosysteme}, (6 (Beilage zu Photonik 41. 2009)), 2009 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Second-order faceting-roughening of the tilt grain boundary in zinc

Straumal, B. B., Gornakova, A. S., Sursaeva, V. G., Yashnikov, V. P.

{International Journal of Materials Research}, 100(4):525-529, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Improvement of interface structure and magnetic properties of Co on Si (100) by surfactant (Sb) mediated growth

Dash, S. P., Goll, D., Carstanjen, H. D.

{Applied Physics A}, 97(3):651-656, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Effect of severe plastic deformation on the coercivity of Co-Cu alloys

Straumal, B. B., Protasova, S. G., Mazilkin, A. A., Baretzky, B., Goll, D., Gunderov, D. V., Valiev, R. Z.

{Philosophical Magazine Letters}, 89(10):649-654, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic properties of cobalt-covered MgB2 films

Treiber, S., Stuhlhofer, B., Habermeier, H.-U., Albrecht, J.

{Superconductor Science and Technology}, 22, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Reconstruction of historic alloys for pipe organs brings true Baroque music back to life

Baretzky, B., Friesel, M., Straumal, B.

{Japan Organist}, 36, pages: 29-38, 2009 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Exchange-coupled L10-FePt/Fe composite patterns with perpendicular magnetization

Breitling, A., Bublat, T., Goll, D.

{Physica Status Solidi - Rapid Research Letters}, 3(5):130-132, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Proton NMR studies of the NaAlH4 structure

Valiente-Banuet, L. E., Majer, G., Müller, K.

{Journal of Magnetic Resonance}, 200, pages: 280-284, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A scaled bilateral control system for experimental one-dimensional teleoperated nanomanipulation

Onal, C. D., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 28(4):484-497, Sage Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Swallowable Tethered Capsule Endoscope for Diagnosing Barrett’s Esophagus

Glass, P., Sitti, M., Pennathur, A., Appasamy, R.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 69(5):AB106, Mosby, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Adhesion of biologically inspired polymer microfibers on soft surfaces

Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6613-6616, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives

Sitti, M., Cusick, B., Aksak, B., Nese, A., Lee, H., Dong, H., Kowalewski, T., Matyjaszewski, K.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(10):2277-2287, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Sensor-Based Learning Algorithm for the Self-Organization of Robot Behavior

Hesse, F., Martius, G., Der, R., Herrmann, J. M.

Algorithms, 2(1):398-409, 2009 (article)

Abstract
Ideally, sensory information forms the only source of information to a robot. We consider an algorithm for the self-organization of a controller. At short timescales the controller is merely reactive but the parameter dynamics and the acquisition of knowledge by an internal model lead to seemingly purposeful behavior on longer timescales. As a paradigmatic example, we study the simulation of an underactuated snake-like robot. By interacting with the real physical system formed by the robotic hardware and the environment, the controller achieves a sensitive and body-specific actuation of the robot.

al

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Magnetism of FePt surface alloys

Honolka, J., Lee, T. Y., Kuhnke, K., Enders, A., Skomski, R., Bornemann, S., Mankovsky, S., Minár, J., Staunton, J., Ebert, H., Hessler, M., Fauth, K., Schütz, G., Buchsbaum, A., Schmid, M., Varga, P., Kern, K.

{Physical Review Letters}, 102(6), 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Enhanced 95Zr diffusion in grain boundaries of nano-crystalline ZrO2 \mbox⋅ 9.5 mol\textpercent Y2O3

Drings, H., Brossmann, U., Carstanjen, H. D., Szökefalvi-Nagy, A., Noll, C., Schaefer, H.-E.

{Physica Status Solidi (A)}, 206(1):54-58, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetism of nanostructured materials for advanced magnetic recording

Goll, D.

{International Journal of Materials Research}, 100, pages: 652-662, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Vortex core switching by coherent excitation with single in-plane magnetic field pulses

Weigand, M., van Waeyenberge, B., Vansteenkiste, A., Curcic, M., Sackmann, V., Stoll, H., Tyliszczak, T., Kaznatcheev, K., Bertwistle, D., Woltersdorf, G., Back, C. H., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review Letters}, 102, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Increase of Mn solubility with decreasing grain size in ZnO

Straumal, B., Baretzky, B., Mazilkin, A., Protasova, S., Myatiev, A., Straumal, P.

{Journal of the European Ceramic Society}, 29(10):1963-1970, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Fe-C nanograined alloys obtained by high-pressure torsion: Structure and magnetic properties

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Dobatkin, S. V., Rodin, A. O., Baretzky, B., Goll, D., Schütz, G.

{Materials Science and Engineering A}, 503, pages: 185-189, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Chiral symmetry breaking of magnetic vortices by sample roughness

Vansteenkiste, A., Weigand, M., Curcic, M., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Van Waeyenberge, B.

{New Journal of Physics}, 11, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Extended s-d model for magnetization dynamics of strongly noncollinear configurations

De Angeli, L., Steiauf, D., Singer, R., Köberle, I., Dietermann, F., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Incorporating Muscle Activation-Contraction dynamics to an optimal control framework for finger movements

Theodorou, Evangelos A., Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2009), 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Recent experimental and theoretical work [1] investigated the neural control of contact transition between motion and force during tapping with the index finger as a nonlinear optimization problem. Such transitions from motion to well-directed contact force are a fundamental part of dexterous manipulation. There are 3 alternative hypotheses of how this transition could be accomplished by the nervous system as a function of changes in direction and magnitude of the torque vector controlling the finger. These hypotheses are 1) an initial change in direction with a subsequent change in magnitude of the torque vector; 2) an initial change in magnitude with a subsequent directional change of the torque vector; and 3) a simultaneous and proportionally equal change of both direction and magnitude of the torque vector. Experimental work in [2] shows that the nervous system selects the first strategy, and in [1] we suggest that this may in fact be the optimal strategy. In [4] the framework of Iterative Linear Quadratic Optimal Regulator (ILQR) was extended to incorporate motion and force control. However, our prior simulation work assumed direct and instantaneous control of joint torques, which ignores the known delays and filtering properties of skeletal muscle. In this study, we implement an ILQR controller for a more biologically plausible biomechanical model of the index finger than [4], and add activation-contraction dynamics to the system to simulate muscle function. The planar biomechanical model includes the kinematics of the 3 joints while the applied torques are driven by activation?contraction dynamics with biologically plausible time constants [3]. In agreement with our experimental work [2], the task is to, within 500 ms, move the finger from a given resting configuration to target configuration with a desired terminal velocity. ILQR does not only stabilize the finger dynamics according to the objective function, but it also generates smooth joint space trajectories with minimal tuning and without an a-priori initial control policy (which is difficult to find for highly dimensional biomechanical systems). Furthemore, the use of this optimal control framework and the addition of activation-contraction dynamics considers the full nonlinear dynamics of the index finger and produces a sequence of postures which are compatible with experimental motion data [2]. These simulations combined with prior experimental results suggest that optimal control is a strong candidate for the generation of finger movements prior to abrupt motion-to-force transitions. This work is funded in part by grants NIH R01 0505520 and NSF EFRI-0836042 to Dr. Francisco J. Valero- Cuevas 1 Venkadesan M, Valero-Cuevas FJ. 
Effects of neuromuscular lags on controlling contact transitions. 
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: 2008. 2 Venkadesan M, Valero-Cuevas FJ. 
Neural Control of Motion-to-Force Transitions with the Fingertip. 
J. Neurosci., Feb 2008; 28: 1366 - 1373; 3 Zajac. Muscle and tendon: properties, models, scaling, and application to biomechanics and motor control. Crit Rev Biomed Eng, 17 4. Weiwei Li., Francisco Valero Cuevas: ?Linear Quadratic Optimal Control of Contact Transition with Fingertip ? ACC 2009

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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On-line learning and modulation of periodic movements with nonlinear dynamical systems

Gams, A., Ijspeert, A., Schaal, S., Lenarčič, J.

Autonomous Robots, 27(1):3-23, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Abstract  The paper presents a two-layered system for (1) learning and encoding a periodic signal without any knowledge on its frequency and waveform, and (2) modulating the learned periodic trajectory in response to external events. The system is used to learn periodic tasks on a humanoid HOAP-2 robot. The first layer of the system is a dynamical system responsible for extracting the fundamental frequency of the input signal, based on adaptive frequency oscillators. The second layer is a dynamical system responsible for learning of the waveform based on a built-in learning algorithm. By combining the two dynamical systems into one system we can rapidly teach new trajectories to robots without any knowledge of the frequency of the demonstration signal. The system extracts and learns only one period of the demonstration signal. Furthermore, the trajectories are robust to perturbations and can be modulated to cope with a dynamic environment. The system is computationally inexpensive, works on-line for any periodic signal, requires no additional signal processing to determine the frequency of the input signal and can be applied in parallel to multiple dimensions. Additionally, it can adapt to changes in frequency and shape, e.g. to non-stationary signals, such as hand-generated signals and human demonstrations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Reversible dry micro-fibrillar adhesives with thermally controllable adhesion

Kim, S., Sitti, M., Xie, T., Xiao, X.

Soft Matter, 5(19):3689-3693, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Enhanced reversible adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide-coated elastomer microfibrillar structures under wet conditions

Glass, P., Chung, H., Washburn, N. R., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6607-6612, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Superconducting phase formation in random neck syntheses: a study of the Y-Ba-Cu-O system by magneto-optics and magnetometry

Willems, J. B., Albrecht, J., Landau, I. L., Hulliger, J.

{Superconductor Science and Technology}, 22, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Determination of spin moments from magnetic EXAFS

Popescu, V., Gü\ssmann, M., Fähnle, M., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Linewidth of ferromagnetic resonance for systems with anisotropic damping

Seib, J., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structural and magnetic deconvolution of FePt/FeOx-nanoparticles using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

Nolle, D., Goering, E., Tietze, T., Schütz, G., Figuerola, A., Manna, L.

{New Journal of Physics}, 11, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic imaging with femtosecond temporal resolution

Li, J., Lee, M.-S., He, W., Redeker, B., Remhof, A., Amaladass, E., Hassel, C., Eimüller, T.

{Review of Scientific Instruments}, 80(7), 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Elliott-Yafet mechanism and the discussion of femtosecond magnetization dynamics

Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Investigation of the stability of Mn12 single molecule magnets

Voss, S., Fonin, M., Burova, L., Burgert, M., Dedkov, Y. S., Preobrajenski, A. B., Goering, E., Groth, U., Kaul, A. R., Ruediger, U.

{Applied Physics A}, 94(3):491-495, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2004


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On the representation, learning and transfer of spatio-temporal movement characteristics

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Mezger, J., Giese, M.

International Journal of Humanoid Robotics, 1(4):613-636, December 2004 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

2004


[BibTex]


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Insect-inspired estimation of egomotion

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS., Krapp, HG.

Neural Computation, 16(11):2245-2260, November 2004 (article)

Abstract
Tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during egomotion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model based on the organization principles in tangential neurons can be used to estimate egomotion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an estimator consisting of a linear combination of optic flow vectors that incorporates prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and egomotion statistics of the sensor. The estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates are of reasonable quality, albeit less reliable.

ei

PDF PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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Efficient face detection by a cascaded support-vector machine expansion

Romdhani, S., Torr, P., Schölkopf, B., Blake, A.

Proceedings of The Royal Society of London A, 460(2501):3283-3297, A, November 2004 (article)

Abstract
We describe a fast system for the detection and localization of human faces in images using a nonlinear ‘support-vector machine‘. We approximate the decision surface in terms of a reduced set of expansion vectors and propose a cascaded evaluation which has the property that the full support-vector expansion is only evaluated on the face-like parts of the image, while the largest part of typical images is classified using a single expansion vector (a simpler and more efficient classifier). As a result, only three reduced-set vectors are used, on average, to classify an image patch. Hence, the cascaded evaluation, presented in this paper, offers a thirtyfold speed-up over an evaluation using the full set of reduced-set vectors, which is itself already thirty times faster than classification using all the support vectors.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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S-cones contribute to flicker brightness in human vision

Wehrhahn, C., Hill, NJ., Dillenburger, B.

34(174.12), 34th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), October 2004 (poster)

Abstract
In the retina of primates three cone types sensitive to short, middle and long wavelengths of light convert photons into electrical signals. Many investigators have presented evidence that, in color normal observers, the signals of cones sensitive to short wavelengths of light (S-cones) do not contribute to the perception of brightness of a colored surface when this is alternated with an achromatic reference (flicker brightness). Other studies indicate that humans do use S-cone signals when performing this task. Common to all these studies is the small number of observers, whose performance data are reported. Considerable variability in the occurrence of cone types across observers has been found, but, to our knowledge, no cone counts exist from larger populations of humans. We reinvestigated how much the S-cones contribute to flicker brightness. 76 color normal observers were tested in a simple psychophysical procedure neutral to the cone type occurence (Teufel & Wehrhahn (2000), JOSA A 17: 994 - 1006). The data show that, in the majority of our observers, S-cones provide input with a negative sign - relative to L- and M-cone contribution - in the task in question. There is indeed considerable between-subject variability such that for 20 out of 76 observers the magnitude of this input does not differ significantly from 0. Finally, we argue that the sign of S-cone contribution to flicker brightness perception by an observer cannot be used to infer the relative sign their contributions to the neuronal signals carrying the information leading to the perception of flicker brightness. We conclude that studies which use only a small number of observers may easily fail to find significant evidence for the small but significant population tendency for the S-cones to contribute to flicker brightness. Our results confirm all earlier results and reconcile their contradictory interpretations.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Learning kernels from biological networks by maximizing entropy

Tsuda, K., Noble, W.

Bioinformatics, 20(Suppl. 1):i326-i333, August 2004 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: The diffusion kernel is a general method for computing pairwise distances among all nodes in a graph, based on the sum of weighted paths between each pair of nodes. This technique has been used successfully, in conjunction with kernel-based learning methods, to draw inferences from several types of biological networks. Results: We show that computing the diffusion kernel is equivalent to maximizing the von Neumann entropy, subject to a global constraint on the sum of the Euclidean distances between nodes. This global constraint allows for high variance in the pairwise distances. Accordingly, we propose an alternative, locally constrained diffusion kernel, and we demonstrate that the resulting kernel allows for more accurate support vector machine prediction of protein functional classifications from metabolic and protein–protein interaction networks.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Masking effect produced by Mach bands on the detection of narrow bars of random polarity

Henning, GB., Hoddinott, KT., Wilson-Smith, ZJ., Hill, NJ.

Journal of the Optical Society of America, 21(8):1379-1387, A, August 2004 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Support Vector Channel Selection in BCI

Lal, T., Schröder, M., Hinterberger, T., Weston, J., Bogdan, M., Birbaumer, N., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 51(6):1003-1010, June 2004 (article)

Abstract
Designing a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system one can choose from a variety of features that may be useful for classifying brain activity during a mental task. For the special case of classifying EEG signals we propose the usage of the state of the art feature selection algorithms Recursive Feature Elimination and Zero-Norm Optimization which are based on the training of Support Vector Machines (SVM). These algorithms can provide more accurate solutions than standard filter methods for feature selection. We adapt the methods for the purpose of selecting EEG channels. For a motor imagery paradigm we show that the number of used channels can be reduced significantly without increasing the classification error. The resulting best channels agree well with the expected underlying cortical activity patterns during the mental tasks. Furthermore we show how time dependent task specific information can be visualized.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Distance-Based Classification with Lipschitz Functions

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 5, pages: 669-695, June 2004 (article)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to develop a framework for large margin classification in metric spaces. We want to find a generalization of linear decision functions for metric spaces and define a corresponding notion of margin such that the decision function separates the training points with a large margin. It will turn out that using Lipschitz functions as decision functions, the inverse of the Lipschitz constant can be interpreted as the size of a margin. In order to construct a clean mathematical setup we isometrically embed the given metric space into a Banach space and the space of Lipschitz functions into its dual space. To analyze the resulting algorithm, we prove several representer theorems. They state that there always exist solutions of the Lipschitz classifier which can be expressed in terms of distance functions to training points. We provide generalization bounds for Lipschitz classifiers in terms of the Rademacher complexities of some Lipschitz function classes. The generality of our approach can be seen from the fact that several well-known algorithms are special cases of the Lipschitz classifier, among them the support vector machine, the linear programming machine, and the 1-nearest neighbor classifier.

ei

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]


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cDNA-Microarray Technology in Cartilage Research - Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis [in German]

Aigner, T., Finger, F., Zien, A., Bartnik, E.

Zeitschrift f{\"u}r Orthop{\"a}die und ihre Grenzgebiete, 142(2):241-247, April 2004 (article)

Abstract
Functional genomics represents a new challenging approach in order to analyze complex diseases such as osteoarthritis on a molecular level. The characterization of the molecular changes of the cartilage cells, the chondrocytes, enables a better understanding of the pathomechanisms of the disease. In particular, the identification and characterization of new target molecules for therapeutic intervention is of interest. Also, potential molecular markers for diagnosis and monitoring of osteoarthritis contribute to a more appropriate patient management. The DNA-microarray technology complements (but does not replace) biochemical and biological research in new disease-relevant genes. Large-scale functional genomics will identify molecular networks such as yet identified players in the anabolic-catabolic balance of articular cartilage as well as disease-relevant intracellular signaling cascades so far rather unknown in articular chondrocytes. However, at the moment it is also important to recognize the limitations of the microarray technology in order to avoid over-interpretation of the results. This might lead to misleading results and prevent to a significant extent a proper use of the potential of this technology in the field of osteoarthritis.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Compression Approach to Support Vector Model Selection

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O., Schölkopf, B.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 5, pages: 293-323, April 2004 (article)

Abstract
In this paper we investigate connections between statistical learning theory and data compression on the basis of support vector machine (SVM) model selection. Inspired by several generalization bounds we construct "compression coefficients" for SVMs which measure the amount by which the training labels can be compressed by a code built from the separating hyperplane. The main idea is to relate the coding precision to geometrical concepts such as the width of the margin or the shape of the data in the feature space. The so derived compression coefficients combine well known quantities such as the radius-margin term R^2/rho^2, the eigenvalues of the kernel matrix, and the number of support vectors. To test whether they are useful in practice we ran model selection experiments on benchmark data sets. As a result we found that compression coefficients can fairly accurately predict the parameters for which the test error is minimized.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Human Classification Behaviour Revisited by Machine Learning

Graf, A., Wichmann, F., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B.

7, pages: 134, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H., H.A. Mallot, R. Ulrich and F.A. Wichmann), 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), Febuary 2004 (poster)

Abstract
We attempt to understand visual classication in humans using both psychophysical and machine learning techniques. Frontal views of human faces were used for a gender classication task. Human subjects classied the faces and their gender judgment, reaction time (RT) and condence rating (CR) were recorded for each face. RTs are longer for incorrect answers than for correct ones, high CRs are correlated with low classication errors and RTs decrease as the CRs increase. This results suggest that patterns difcult to classify need more computation by the brain than patterns easy to classify. Hyperplane learning algorithms such as Support Vector Machines (SVM), Relevance Vector Machines (RVM), Prototype learners (Prot) and K-means learners (Kmean) were used on the same classication task using the Principal Components of the texture and oweld representation of the faces. The classication performance of the learning algorithms was estimated using the face database with the true gender of the faces as labels, and also with the gender estimated by the subjects. Kmean yield a classication performance close to humans while SVM and RVM are much better. This surprising behaviour may be due to the fact that humans are trained on real faces during their lifetime while they were here tested on articial ones, while the algorithms were trained and tested on the same set of stimuli. We then correlated the human responses to the distance of the stimuli to the separating hyperplane (SH) of the learning algorithms. On the whole stimuli far from the SH are classied more accurately, faster and with higher condence than those near to the SH if we pool data across all our subjects and stimuli. We also nd three noteworthy results. First, SVMs and RVMs can learn to classify faces using the subjects' labels but perform much better when using the true labels. Second, correlating the average response of humans (classication error, RT or CR) with the distance to the SH on a face-by-face basis using Spearman's rank correlation coefcients shows that RVMs recreate human performance most closely in every respect. Third, the mean-of-class prototype, its popularity in neuroscience notwithstanding, is the least human-like classier in all cases examined.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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m-Alternative-Forced-Choice: Improving the Efficiency of the Method of Constant Stimuli

Jäkel, F., Hill, J., Wichmann, F.

7, pages: 118, 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2004 (poster)

Abstract
We explored several ways to improve the efficiency of measuring psychometric functions without resorting to adaptive procedures. a) The number m of alternatives in an m-alternative-forced-choice (m-AFC) task improves the efficiency of the method of constant stimuli. b) When alternatives are presented simultaneously on different positions on a screen rather than sequentially time can be saved and memory load for the subject can be reduced. c) A touch-screen can further help to make the experimental procedure more intuitive. We tested these ideas in the measurement of contrast sensitivity and compared them to results obtained by sequential presentation in two-interval-forced-choice (2-IFC). Qualitatively all methods (m-AFC and 2-IFC) recovered the characterictic shape of the contrast sensitivity function in three subjects. The m-AFC paradigm only took about 60% of the time of the 2-IFC task. We tried m=2,4,8 and found 4-AFC to give the best model fits and 2-AFC to have the least bias.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Efficient Approximations for Support Vector Classifiers

Kienzle, W., Franz, M.

7, pages: 68, 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2004 (poster)

Abstract
In face detection, support vector machines (SVM) and neural networks (NN) have been shown to outperform most other classication methods. While both approaches are learning-based, there are distinct advantages and drawbacks to each method: NNs are difcult to design and train but can lead to very small and efcient classiers. In comparison, SVM model selection and training is rather straightforward, and, more importantly, guaranteed to converge to a globally optimal (in the sense of training errors) solution. Unfortunately, SVM classiers tend to have large representations which are inappropriate for time-critical image processing applications. In this work, we examine various existing and new methods for simplifying support vector decision rules. Our goal is to obtain efcient classiers (as with NNs) while keeping the numerical and statistical advantages of SVMs. For a given SVM solution, we compute a cascade of approximations with increasing complexities. Each classier is tuned so that the detection rate is near 100%. At run-time, the rst (simplest) detector is evaluated on the whole image. Then, any subsequent classier is applied only to those positions that have been classied as positive throughout all previous stages. The false positive rate at the end equals that of the last (i.e. most complex) detector. In contrast, since many image positions are discarded by lower-complexity classiers, the average computation time per patch decreases signicantly compared to the time needed for evaluating the highest-complexity classier alone.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]