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2019


Decoding subcategories of human bodies from both body- and face-responsive cortical regions
Decoding subcategories of human bodies from both body- and face-responsive cortical regions

Foster, C., Zhao, M., Romero, J., Black, M. J., Mohler, B. J., Bartels, A., Bülthoff, I.

NeuroImage, 202(15):116085, November 2019 (article)

Abstract
Our visual system can easily categorize objects (e.g. faces vs. bodies) and further differentiate them into subcategories (e.g. male vs. female). This ability is particularly important for objects of social significance, such as human faces and bodies. While many studies have demonstrated category selectivity to faces and bodies in the brain, how subcategories of faces and bodies are represented remains unclear. Here, we investigated how the brain encodes two prominent subcategories shared by both faces and bodies, sex and weight, and whether neural responses to these subcategories rely on low-level visual, high-level visual or semantic similarity. We recorded brain activity with fMRI while participants viewed faces and bodies that varied in sex, weight, and image size. The results showed that the sex of bodies can be decoded from both body- and face-responsive brain areas, with the former exhibiting more consistent size-invariant decoding than the latter. Body weight could also be decoded in face-responsive areas and in distributed body-responsive areas, and this decoding was also invariant to image size. The weight of faces could be decoded from the fusiform body area (FBA), and weight could be decoded across face and body stimuli in the extrastriate body area (EBA) and a distributed body-responsive area. The sex of well-controlled faces (e.g. excluding hairstyles) could not be decoded from face- or body-responsive regions. These results demonstrate that both face- and body-responsive brain regions encode information that can distinguish the sex and weight of bodies. Moreover, the neural patterns corresponding to sex and weight were invariant to image size and could sometimes generalize across face and body stimuli, suggesting that such subcategorical information is encoded with a high-level visual or semantic code.

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paper pdf DOI [BibTex]

2019


paper pdf DOI [BibTex]


Active Perception based Formation Control for Multiple Aerial Vehicles
Active Perception based Formation Control for Multiple Aerial Vehicles

Tallamraju, R., Price, E., Ludwig, R., Karlapalem, K., Bülthoff, H. H., Black, M. J., Ahmad, A.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, Robotics and Automation Letters, 4(4):4491-4498, IEEE, October 2019 (article)

Abstract
We present a novel robotic front-end for autonomous aerial motion-capture (mocap) in outdoor environments. In previous work, we presented an approach for cooperative detection and tracking (CDT) of a subject using multiple micro-aerial vehicles (MAVs). However, it did not ensure optimal view-point configurations of the MAVs to minimize the uncertainty in the person's cooperatively tracked 3D position estimate. In this article, we introduce an active approach for CDT. In contrast to cooperatively tracking only the 3D positions of the person, the MAVs can actively compute optimal local motion plans, resulting in optimal view-point configurations, which minimize the uncertainty in the tracked estimate. We achieve this by decoupling the goal of active tracking into a quadratic objective and non-convex constraints corresponding to angular configurations of the MAVs w.r.t. the person. We derive this decoupling using Gaussian observation model assumptions within the CDT algorithm. We preserve convexity in optimization by embedding all the non-convex constraints, including those for dynamic obstacle avoidance, as external control inputs in the MPC dynamics. Multiple real robot experiments and comparisons involving 3 MAVs in several challenging scenarios are presented.

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pdf DOI Project Page [BibTex]

pdf DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Learning and Tracking the {3D} Body Shape of Freely Moving Infants from {RGB-D} sequences
Learning and Tracking the 3D Body Shape of Freely Moving Infants from RGB-D sequences

Hesse, N., Pujades, S., Black, M., Arens, M., Hofmann, U., Schroeder, S.

Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (TPAMI), 2019 (article)

Abstract
Statistical models of the human body surface are generally learned from thousands of high-quality 3D scans in predefined poses to cover the wide variety of human body shapes and articulations. Acquisition of such data requires expensive equipment, calibration procedures, and is limited to cooperative subjects who can understand and follow instructions, such as adults. We present a method for learning a statistical 3D Skinned Multi-Infant Linear body model (SMIL) from incomplete, low-quality RGB-D sequences of freely moving infants. Quantitative experiments show that SMIL faithfully represents the RGB-D data and properly factorizes the shape and pose of the infants. To demonstrate the applicability of SMIL, we fit the model to RGB-D sequences of freely moving infants and show, with a case study, that our method captures enough motion detail for General Movements Assessment (GMA), a method used in clinical practice for early detection of neurodevelopmental disorders in infants. SMIL provides a new tool for analyzing infant shape and movement and is a step towards an automated system for GMA.

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pdf Journal DOI [BibTex]

pdf Journal DOI [BibTex]


 Perceptual Effects of Inconsistency in Human Animations
Perceptual Effects of Inconsistency in Human Animations

Kenny, S., Mahmood, N., Honda, C., Black, M. J., Troje, N. F.

ACM Trans. Appl. Percept., 16(1):2:1-2:18, Febuary 2019 (article)

Abstract
The individual shape of the human body, including the geometry of its articulated structure and the distribution of weight over that structure, influences the kinematics of a person’s movements. How sensitive is the visual system to inconsistencies between shape and motion introduced by retargeting motion from one person onto the shape of another? We used optical motion capture to record five pairs of male performers with large differences in body weight, while they pushed, lifted, and threw objects. From these data, we estimated both the kinematics of the actions as well as the performer’s individual body shape. To obtain consistent and inconsistent stimuli, we created animated avatars by combining the shape and motion estimates from either a single performer or from different performers. Using these stimuli we conducted three experiments in an immersive virtual reality environment. First, a group of participants detected which of two stimuli was inconsistent. Performance was very low, and results were only marginally significant. Next, a second group of participants rated perceived attractiveness, eeriness, and humanness of consistent and inconsistent stimuli, but these judgements of animation characteristics were not affected by consistency of the stimuli. Finally, a third group of participants rated properties of the objects rather than of the performers. Here, we found strong influences of shape-motion inconsistency on perceived weight and thrown distance of objects. This suggests that the visual system relies on its knowledge of shape and motion and that these components are assimilated into an altered perception of the action outcome. We propose that the visual system attempts to resist inconsistent interpretations of human animations. Actions involving object manipulations present an opportunity for the visual system to reinterpret the introduced inconsistencies as a change in the dynamics of an object rather than as an unexpected combination of body shape and body motion.

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publisher pdf DOI [BibTex]

publisher pdf DOI [BibTex]


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Response of active Brownian particles to shear flow

Asheichyk, K., Solon, A., Rohwer, C. M., Krüger, M.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 150(14), American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, N.Y., 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Vortex Mass in the Three-Dimensional O(2) Scalar Theory

Delfino, G., Selke, W., Squarcini, A.

Physical Review Letters, 122(5), American Physical Society, Woodbury, N.Y., 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Dynamics near planar walls for various model self-phoretic particles

Bayati, P., Popescu, M. N., Uspal, W. E., Dietrich, S., Najafi, A.

Soft Matter, 15(28):5644-5672, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Glucose Oxidase Micropumps: Multi-Faceted Effects of Chemical Activity on Tracer Particles Near the Solid-Liquid Interface

Munteanu, R. E., Popescu, M. N., Gáspár, S.

Condensed Matter, 4(3), MDPI, Basel, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]


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Criticality senses topology

Vasilyev, O. A., Maciolek, A., Dietrich, S.

EPL, 128(2), EDP Science, Les-Ulis, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Autonomous Identification and Goal-Directed Invocation of Event-Predictive Behavioral Primitives
Autonomous Identification and Goal-Directed Invocation of Event-Predictive Behavioral Primitives

Gumbsch, C., Butz, M. V., Martius, G.

IEEE Transactions on Cognitive and Developmental Systems, 2019 (article)

Abstract
Voluntary behavior of humans appears to be composed of small, elementary building blocks or behavioral primitives. While this modular organization seems crucial for the learning of complex motor skills and the flexible adaption of behavior to new circumstances, the problem of learning meaningful, compositional abstractions from sensorimotor experiences remains an open challenge. Here, we introduce a computational learning architecture, termed surprise-based behavioral modularization into event-predictive structures (SUBMODES), that explores behavior and identifies the underlying behavioral units completely from scratch. The SUBMODES architecture bootstraps sensorimotor exploration using a self-organizing neural controller. While exploring the behavioral capabilities of its own body, the system learns modular structures that predict the sensorimotor dynamics and generate the associated behavior. In line with recent theories of event perception, the system uses unexpected prediction error signals, i.e., surprise, to detect transitions between successive behavioral primitives. We show that, when applied to two robotic systems with completely different body kinematics, the system manages to learn a variety of complex behavioral primitives. Moreover, after initial self-exploration the system can use its learned predictive models progressively more effectively for invoking model predictive planning and goal-directed control in different tasks and environments.

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arXiv PDF video link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Drag Force for Asymmetrically Grafted Colloids in Polymer Solutions

Werner, M., Malgaretti, P., Maciolek, A.

Frontiers in Physics, 7, Frontiers Media, Lausanne, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Feeling Your Neighbors across the Walls: How Interpore Ionic Interactions Affect Capacitive Energy Storage

Kondrat, S., Vasilyev, O., Kornyshev, A. A.

The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 10(16):4523-4527, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Active Janus colloids at chemically structured surfaces

Uspal, W. E., Popescu, M. N., Dietrich, S., Tasinkevych, M.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 150(20), American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, N.Y., 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Illumination-induced motion of a Janus nanoparticle in binary solvents

Araki, T., Maciolek, A.

Soft Matter, 15(26):5243-5254, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Transient response of an electrolyte to a thermal quench

Janssen, M., Bier, M.

Physical Review E, 99(4), American Physical Society, Melville, NY, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Even Delta-Matroids and the Complexity of Planar Boolean CSPs

Kazda, A., Kolmogorov, V., Rolinek, M.

ACM Transactions on Algorithms, 15(2, Special Issue on Soda'17 and Regular Papers):Article Number 22, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Machine Learning for Haptics: Inferring Multi-Contact Stimulation From Sparse Sensor Configuration

Sun, H., Martius, G.

Frontiers in Neurorobotics, 13, pages: 51, 2019 (article)

Abstract
Robust haptic sensation systems are essential for obtaining dexterous robots. Currently, we have solutions for small surface areas such as fingers, but affordable and robust techniques for covering large areas of an arbitrary 3D surface are still missing. Here, we introduce a general machine learning framework to infer multi-contact haptic forces on a 3D robot’s limb surface from internal deformation measured by only a few physical sensors. The general idea of this framework is to predict first the whole surface deformation pattern from the sparsely placed sensors and then to infer number, locations and force magnitudes of unknown contact points. We show how this can be done even if training data can only be obtained for single-contact points using transfer learning at the example of a modified limb of the Poppy robot. With only 10 strain-gauge sensors we obtain a high accuracy also for multiple-contact points. The method can be applied to arbitrarily shaped surfaces and physical sensor types, as long as training data can be obtained.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]


The Virtual Caliper: Rapid Creation of Metrically Accurate Avatars from {3D} Measurements
The Virtual Caliper: Rapid Creation of Metrically Accurate Avatars from 3D Measurements

Pujades, S., Mohler, B., Thaler, A., Tesch, J., Mahmood, N., Hesse, N., Bülthoff, H. H., Black, M. J.

IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 25, pages: 1887,1897, IEEE, 2019 (article)

Abstract
Creating metrically accurate avatars is important for many applications such as virtual clothing try-on, ergonomics, medicine, immersive social media, telepresence, and gaming. Creating avatars that precisely represent a particular individual is challenging however, due to the need for expensive 3D scanners, privacy issues with photographs or videos, and difficulty in making accurate tailoring measurements. We overcome these challenges by creating “The Virtual Caliper”, which uses VR game controllers to make simple measurements. First, we establish what body measurements users can reliably make on their own body. We find several distance measurements to be good candidates and then verify that these are linearly related to 3D body shape as represented by the SMPL body model. The Virtual Caliper enables novice users to accurately measure themselves and create an avatar with their own body shape. We evaluate the metric accuracy relative to ground truth 3D body scan data, compare the method quantitatively to other avatar creation tools, and perform extensive perceptual studies. We also provide a software application to the community that enables novices to rapidly create avatars in fewer than five minutes. Not only is our approach more rapid than existing methods, it exports a metrically accurate 3D avatar model that is rigged and skinned.

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Project Page IEEE Open Access IEEE Open Access PDF DOI [BibTex]

Project Page IEEE Open Access IEEE Open Access PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Aging phenomena during phase separation in fluids: decay of autocorrelation for vapor\textendashliquid transitions

Roy, Sutapa, Bera, Arabinda, Majumder, Suman, Das, Subir K.

Soft Matter, 15(23):4743-4750, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Flux and storage of energy in nonequilibrium stationary states

Holyst, R., Maciolek, A., Zhang, Y., Litniewski, M., Knycha\la, P., Kasprzak, M., Banaszak, M.

Physical Review E, 99(4), American Physical Society, Melville, NY, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Correlations and forces in sheared fluids with or without quenching

Rohwer, C. M., Maciolek, A., Dietrich, S., Krüger, M.

New Journal of Physics, 21, IOP Publishing, Bristol, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]


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Ensemble dependence of critical Casimir forces in films with Dirichlet boundary conditions

Rohwer, C. M., Squarcini, A., Vasilyev, O., Dietrich, S., Gross, M.

Physical Review E, 99(6), American Physical Society, Melville, NY, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Controlling the dynamics of colloidal particles by critical Casimir forces

Magazzù, A., Callegari, A., Staforelli, J. P., Gambassi, A., Dietrich, S., Volpe, G.

Soft Matter, 15(10):2152-2162, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Charge regulation radically modifies electrostatics in membrane stacks

Majee, A., Bier, M., Blossey, R., Podgornik, R.

Physical Review E, 100(5), American Physical Society, Melville, NY, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Self and Body Part Localization in Virtual Reality: Comparing a Headset and a Large-Screen Immersive Display

van der Veer, A. H., Longo, M. R., Alsmith, A. J. T., Wong, H. Y., Mohler, B. J.

Frontiers in Robotics and AI, 6(33), 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Comment on "Which interactions dominate in active colloids?" [J. Chem. Phys. 150, 061102 (2019)]

Popescu, M. N., Dominguez, A., Uspal, W. E., Tasinkevych, M., Dietrich, S.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 151(6), American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, N.Y., 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Current-mediated synchronization of a pair of beating non-identical flagella

Dotsenko, V., Maciolek, A., Oshanin, G., Vasilyev, O., Dietrich, S.

New Journal of Physics, 21, IOP Publishing, Bristol, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Driving an electrolyte through a corrugated nanopore

Malgaretti, P., Janssen, M., Pagonabarraga, I., Rubi, J. M.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 151(8), American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, N.Y., 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Spectral Content of a Single Non-Brownian Trajectory

Krapf, D., Lukat, N., Marinari, E., Metzler, R., Oshanin, G., Selhuber-Unkel, C., Squarcini, A., Stadler, L., Weiss, M., Xu, X.

Physical Review X, 9(1), American Physical Society, New York, NY, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Curvature affects electrolyte relaxation: Studies of spherical and cylindrical electrodes

Janssen, M.

Physical Review E, 100(4), American Physical Society, Melville, NY, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Dynamics of the critical Casimir force for a conserved order parameter after a critical quench

Gross, M., Rohwer, C. M., Dietrich, S.

Physical Review E, 100(1), American Physical Society, Melville, NY, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Interface structures in ionic liquid crystals

Bartsch, H., Bier, M., Dietrich, S.

Soft Matter, 15(20):4109-4126, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Interfacial premelting of ice in nano composite materials

Li, H., Bier, M., Mars, J., Weiss, H., Dippel, A., Gutowski, O., Honkimäki, V., Mezger, M.

Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 21(7):3734-3741, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, England, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Connections Matter: On the Importance of Pore Percolation for Nanoporous Supercapacitors

Vasilyev, O., Kornyshev, A. A., Kondrat, S.

ACS Applied Energy Materials, 2(8):5386-5390, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Theory of light-activated catalytic Janus particles

Uspal, W. E.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 150(11), American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, N.Y., 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Recovering superhydrophobicity in nanoscale and macroscale surface textures

Giacomello, A., Schimmele, L., Dietrich, S., Tasinkevych, M.

Soft Matter, 15(37):7462-7471, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Brownian dynamics assessment of enhanced diffusion exhibited by "fluctuating-dumbbell enzymes".

Kondrat, S., Popescu, M. N.

Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 21(35):18811-18815, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, England, 2019 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2016


Creating body shapes from verbal descriptions by linking similarity spaces
Creating body shapes from verbal descriptions by linking similarity spaces

Hill, M. Q., Streuber, S., Hahn, C. A., Black, M. J., O’Toole, A. J.

Psychological Science, 27(11):1486-1497, November 2016, (article)

Abstract
Brief verbal descriptions of bodies (e.g. curvy, long-legged) can elicit vivid mental images. The ease with which we create these mental images belies the complexity of three-dimensional body shapes. We explored the relationship between body shapes and body descriptions and show that a small number of words can be used to generate categorically accurate representations of three-dimensional bodies. The dimensions of body shape variation that emerged in a language-based similarity space were related to major dimensions of variation computed directly from three-dimensional laser scans of 2094 bodies. This allowed us to generate three-dimensional models of people in the shape space using only their coordinates on analogous dimensions in the language-based description space. Human descriptions of photographed bodies and their corresponding models matched closely. The natural mapping between the spaces illustrates the role of language as a concise code for body shape, capturing perceptually salient global and local body features.

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pdf [BibTex]

2016


pdf [BibTex]


{Body Talk}: Crowdshaping Realistic {3D} Avatars with Words
Body Talk: Crowdshaping Realistic 3D Avatars with Words

Streuber, S., Quiros-Ramirez, M. A., Hill, M. Q., Hahn, C. A., Zuffi, S., O’Toole, A., Black, M. J.

ACM Trans. Graph. (Proc. SIGGRAPH), 35(4):54:1-54:14, July 2016 (article)

Abstract
Realistic, metrically accurate, 3D human avatars are useful for games, shopping, virtual reality, and health applications. Such avatars are not in wide use because solutions for creating them from high-end scanners, low-cost range cameras, and tailoring measurements all have limitations. Here we propose a simple solution and show that it is surprisingly accurate. We use crowdsourcing to generate attribute ratings of 3D body shapes corresponding to standard linguistic descriptions of 3D shape. We then learn a linear function relating these ratings to 3D human shape parameters. Given an image of a new body, we again turn to the crowd for ratings of the body shape. The collection of linguistic ratings of a photograph provides remarkably strong constraints on the metric 3D shape. We call the process crowdshaping and show that our Body Talk system produces shapes that are perceptually indistinguishable from bodies created from high-resolution scans and that the metric accuracy is sufficient for many tasks. This makes body “scanning” practical without a scanner, opening up new applications including database search, visualization, and extracting avatars from books.

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pdf web tool video talk (ppt) [BibTex]

pdf web tool video talk (ppt) [BibTex]


Capturing Hands in Action using Discriminative Salient Points and Physics Simulation
Capturing Hands in Action using Discriminative Salient Points and Physics Simulation

Tzionas, D., Ballan, L., Srikantha, A., Aponte, P., Pollefeys, M., Gall, J.

International Journal of Computer Vision (IJCV), 118(2):172-193, June 2016 (article)

Abstract
Hand motion capture is a popular research field, recently gaining more attention due to the ubiquity of RGB-D sensors. However, even most recent approaches focus on the case of a single isolated hand. In this work, we focus on hands that interact with other hands or objects and present a framework that successfully captures motion in such interaction scenarios for both rigid and articulated objects. Our framework combines a generative model with discriminatively trained salient points to achieve a low tracking error and with collision detection and physics simulation to achieve physically plausible estimates even in case of occlusions and missing visual data. Since all components are unified in a single objective function which is almost everywhere differentiable, it can be optimized with standard optimization techniques. Our approach works for monocular RGB-D sequences as well as setups with multiple synchronized RGB cameras. For a qualitative and quantitative evaluation, we captured 29 sequences with a large variety of interactions and up to 150 degrees of freedom.

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Website pdf link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Website pdf link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Human Pose Estimation from Video and IMUs
Human Pose Estimation from Video and IMUs

Marcard, T. V., Pons-Moll, G., Rosenhahn, B.

Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence PAMI, 38(8):1533-1547, January 2016 (article)

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data pdf dataset_documentation [BibTex]

data pdf dataset_documentation [BibTex]


Moving-horizon Nonlinear Least Squares-based Multirobot Cooperative Perception
Moving-horizon Nonlinear Least Squares-based Multirobot Cooperative Perception

Ahmad, A., Bülthoff, H.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 83, pages: 275-286, 2016 (article)

Abstract
In this article we present an online estimator for multirobot cooperative localization and target tracking based on nonlinear least squares minimization. Our method not only makes the rigorous optimization-based approach applicable online but also allows the estimator to be stable and convergent. We do so by employing a moving horizon technique to nonlinear least squares minimization and a novel design of the arrival cost function that ensures stability and convergence of the estimator. Through an extensive set of real robot experiments, we demonstrate the robustness of our method as well as the optimality of the arrival cost function. The experiments include comparisons of our method with i) an extended Kalman filter-based online-estimator and ii) an offline-estimator based on full-trajectory nonlinear least squares.

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Self-diffusiophoresis of chemically active colloids

Popescu, M. N., Uspal, W. E., Dietrich, S.

The European Physical Journal Special Topics, 225(11-12):2189-2206, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Perpetual superhydrophobicity

Giacomello, A., Schimmele, L., Dietrich, S., Tasinkevych, M.

Soft Matter, 12, pages: 8927-8934, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Molecular dynamics simulation of a binary mixture near the lower critical point

Pousaneh, F., Edholm, O., Maciolek, A.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 145(1), American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, N.Y., 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Effective Interaction between Active Colloids and Fluid Interfaces Induced by Marangoni Flows

Dom\’\inguez, A., Malgaretti, P., Popescu, M. N., Dietrich, S.

Physical Review Letters, 116, American Physical Society, Woodbury, N.Y., 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Dynamics of Novel Photoactive AgCl Microstars and Their Environmental Applications

Simmchen, J., Baeza, A., Miguel-Lopez, A., Stanton, M. M., Vallet-Regi, M., Ruiz-Molina, D., Sánchez, S.

ChemNanoMat, 3(1):65-71, Wiley, Weinheim, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Wetting hysteresis induced by nanodefects

Giacomello, A., Schimmele, L., Dietrich, S.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(3):E262-E271, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C., 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Three-phase contact line and line tension of electrolyte solutions in contact with charged substrates

Ibagon, I., Bier, M., Dietrich, S.

Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, 28(24), IOP Publishing, Bristol, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]