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A Continuous-time Perspective for Modeling Acceleration in Riemannian Optimization

F Alimisis, F., Orvieto, A., Becigneul, G., Lucchi, A.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), June 2020 (conference) Accepted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Kernel Mean Embedding Approach to Reducing Conservativeness in Stochastic Programming and Control

Zhu, J., Diehl, M., Schölkopf, B.

2nd Annual Conference on Learning for Dynamics and Control (L4DC), June 2020 (conference) Accepted

ei

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Mixed-curvature Variational Autoencoders

Skopek, O., Ganea, O., Becigneul, G.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), April 2020 (conference) Accepted

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders
From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders

Ghosh*, P., Sajjadi*, M. S. M., Vergari, A., Black, M. J., Schölkopf, B.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR) , April 2020, *equal contribution (conference) Accepted

Abstract
Variational Autoencoders (VAEs) provide a theoretically-backed framework for deep generative models. However, they often produce “blurry” images, which is linked to their training objective. Sampling in the most popular implementation, the Gaussian VAE, can be interpreted as simply injecting noise to the input of a deterministic decoder. In practice, this simply enforces a smooth latent space structure. We challenge the adoption of the full VAE framework on this specific point in favor of a simpler, deterministic one. Specifically, we investigate how substituting stochasticity with other explicit and implicit regularization schemes can lead to a meaningful latent space without having to force it to conform to an arbitrarily chosen prior. To retrieve a generative mechanism for sampling new data points, we propose to employ an efficient ex-post density estimation step that can be readily adopted both for the proposed deterministic autoencoders as well as to improve sample quality of existing VAEs. We show in a rigorous empirical study that regularized deterministic autoencoding achieves state-of-the-art sample quality on the common MNIST, CIFAR-10 and CelebA datasets.

ei ps

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Sliding Mode Control with Gaussian Process Regression for Underwater Robots

Lima, G. S., Trimpe, S., Bessa, W. M.

Journal of Intelligent & Robotic Systems, January 2020 (article)

ics

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Hierarchical Event-triggered Learning for Cyclically Excited Systems with Application to Wireless Sensor Networks
Hierarchical Event-triggered Learning for Cyclically Excited Systems with Application to Wireless Sensor Networks

Beuchert, J., Solowjow, F., Raisch, J., Trimpe, S., Seel, T.

IEEE Control Systems Letters, 4(1):103-108, January 2020 (article)

ics

arXiv PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

arXiv PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Control-guided Communication: Efficient Resource Arbitration and Allocation in Multi-hop Wireless Control Systems
Control-guided Communication: Efficient Resource Arbitration and Allocation in Multi-hop Wireless Control Systems

Baumann, D., Mager, F., Zimmerling, M., Trimpe, S.

IEEE Control Systems Letters, 4(1):127-132, January 2020 (article)

ics

arXiv PDF DOI [BibTex]

arXiv PDF DOI [BibTex]


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More Powerful Selective Kernel Tests for Feature Selection

Lim, J. N., Yamada, M., Jitkrittum, W., Terada, Y., Matsui, S., Shimodaira, H.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 2020 (conference) To be published

ei

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Computationally Tractable Riemannian Manifolds for Graph Embeddings

Cruceru, C., Becigneul, G., Ganea, O.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2020 (conference) Submitted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Practical Accelerated Optimization on Riemannian Manifolds

F Alimisis, F., Orvieto, A., Becigneul, G., Lucchi, A.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2020 (conference) Submitted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Spatial Scheduling of Informative Meetings for Multi-Agent Persistent Coverage
Spatial Scheduling of Informative Meetings for Multi-Agent Persistent Coverage

Haksar, R. N., Trimpe, S., Schwager, M.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 2020 (article) Accepted

ics

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Constant Curvature Graph Convolutional Networks

Bachmann*, G., Becigneul*, G., Ganea, O.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2020, *equal contribution (conference) Submitted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Event-triggered Learning
Event-triggered Learning

Solowjow, F., Trimpe, S.

Automatica, 2020 (article) Accepted

ics

arXiv PDF Project Page [BibTex]


Safe and Fast Tracking on a Robot Manipulator: Robust MPC and Neural Network Control
Safe and Fast Tracking on a Robot Manipulator: Robust MPC and Neural Network Control

Nubert, J., Koehler, J., Berenz, V., Allgower, F., Trimpe, S.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 2020 (article) Accepted

Abstract
Fast feedback control and safety guarantees are essential in modern robotics. We present an approach that achieves both by combining novel robust model predictive control (MPC) with function approximation via (deep) neural networks (NNs). The result is a new approach for complex tasks with nonlinear, uncertain, and constrained dynamics as are common in robotics. Specifically, we leverage recent results in MPC research to propose a new robust setpoint tracking MPC algorithm, which achieves reliable and safe tracking of a dynamic setpoint while guaranteeing stability and constraint satisfaction. The presented robust MPC scheme constitutes a one-layer approach that unifies the often separated planning and control layers, by directly computing the control command based on a reference and possibly obstacle positions. As a separate contribution, we show how the computation time of the MPC can be drastically reduced by approximating the MPC law with a NN controller. The NN is trained and validated from offline samples of the MPC, yielding statistical guarantees, and used in lieu thereof at run time. Our experiments on a state-of-the-art robot manipulator are the first to show that both the proposed robust and approximate MPC schemes scale to real-world robotic systems.

am ics

arXiv PDF DOI [BibTex]

arXiv PDF DOI [BibTex]

2013


Probabilistic Object Tracking Using a Range Camera
Probabilistic Object Tracking Using a Range Camera

Wüthrich, M., Pastor, P., Kalakrishnan, M., Bohg, J., Schaal, S.

In IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 3195-3202, IEEE, November 2013 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We address the problem of tracking the 6-DoF pose of an object while it is being manipulated by a human or a robot. We use a dynamic Bayesian network to perform inference and compute a posterior distribution over the current object pose. Depending on whether a robot or a human manipulates the object, we employ a process model with or without knowledge of control inputs. Observations are obtained from a range camera. As opposed to previous object tracking methods, we explicitly model self-occlusions and occlusions from the environment, e.g, the human or robotic hand. This leads to a strongly non-linear observation model and additional dependencies in the Bayesian network. We employ a Rao-Blackwellised particle filter to compute an estimate of the object pose at every time step. In a set of experiments, we demonstrate the ability of our method to accurately and robustly track the object pose in real-time while it is being manipulated by a human or a robot.

am

arXiv Video Code Video DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2013


arXiv Video Code Video DOI Project Page [BibTex]


3-D Object Reconstruction of Symmetric Objects by Fusing Visual and Tactile Sensing
3-D Object Reconstruction of Symmetric Objects by Fusing Visual and Tactile Sensing

Illonen, J., Bohg, J., Kyrki, V.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 33(2):321-341, Sage, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
In this work, we propose to reconstruct a complete 3-D model of an unknown object by fusion of visual and tactile information while the object is grasped. Assuming the object is symmetric, a first hypothesis of its complete 3-D shape is generated. A grasp is executed on the object with a robotic manipulator equipped with tactile sensors. Given the detected contacts between the fingers and the object, the initial full object model including the symmetry parameters can be refined. This refined model will then allow the planning of more complex manipulation tasks. The main contribution of this work is an optimal estimation approach for the fusion of visual and tactile data applying the constraint of object symmetry. The fusion is formulated as a state estimation problem and solved with an iterative extended Kalman filter. The approach is validated experimentally using both artificial and real data from two different robotic platforms.

am

Web DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Web DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Correlation of Simultaneously Acquired Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 2-Deoxy-[18F] fluoro-2-D-glucose Positron Emission Tomography of Pulmonary Lesions in a Dedicated Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance/Positron Emission Tomography System

Schmidt, H., Brendle, C., Schraml, C., Martirosian, P., Bezrukov, I., Hetzel, J., Müller, M., Sauter, A., Claussen, C., Pfannenberg, C., Schwenzer, N.

Investigative Radiology, 48(5):247-255, May 2013 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


Learning and Optimization with Submodular Functions
Learning and Optimization with Submodular Functions

Sankaran, B., Ghazvininejad, M., He, X., Kale, D., Cohen, L.

ArXiv, May 2013 (techreport)

Abstract
In many naturally occurring optimization problems one needs to ensure that the definition of the optimization problem lends itself to solutions that are tractable to compute. In cases where exact solutions cannot be computed tractably, it is beneficial to have strong guarantees on the tractable approximate solutions. In order operate under these criterion most optimization problems are cast under the umbrella of convexity or submodularity. In this report we will study design and optimization over a common class of functions called submodular functions. Set functions, and specifically submodular set functions, characterize a wide variety of naturally occurring optimization problems, and the property of submodularity of set functions has deep theoretical consequences with wide ranging applications. Informally, the property of submodularity of set functions concerns the intuitive principle of diminishing returns. This property states that adding an element to a smaller set has more value than adding it to a larger set. Common examples of submodular monotone functions are entropies, concave functions of cardinality, and matroid rank functions; non-monotone examples include graph cuts, network flows, and mutual information. In this paper we will review the formal definition of submodularity; the optimization of submodular functions, both maximization and minimization; and finally discuss some applications in relation to learning and reasoning using submodular functions.

am

arxiv link (url) [BibTex]

arxiv link (url) [BibTex]


Hypothesis Testing Framework for Active Object Detection
Hypothesis Testing Framework for Active Object Detection

Sankaran, B., Atanasov, N., Le Ny, J., Koletschka, T., Pappas, G., Daniilidis, K.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), May 2013, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
One of the central problems in computer vision is the detection of semantically important objects and the estimation of their pose. Most of the work in object detection has been based on single image processing and its performance is limited by occlusions and ambiguity in appearance and geometry. This paper proposes an active approach to object detection by controlling the point of view of a mobile depth camera. When an initial static detection phase identifies an object of interest, several hypotheses are made about its class and orientation. The sensor then plans a sequence of view-points, which balances the amount of energy used to move with the chance of identifying the correct hypothesis. We formulate an active M-ary hypothesis testing problem, which includes sensor mobility, and solve it using a point-based approximate POMDP algorithm. The validity of our approach is verified through simulation and experiments with real scenes captured by a kinect sensor. The results suggest a significant improvement over static object detection.

am

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Replacing Causal Faithfulness with Algorithmic Independence of Conditionals

Lemeire, J., Janzing, D.

Minds and Machines, 23(2):227-249, May 2013 (article)

Abstract
Independence of Conditionals (IC) has recently been proposed as a basic rule for causal structure learning. If a Bayesian network represents the causal structure, its Conditional Probability Distributions (CPDs) should be algorithmically independent. In this paper we compare IC with causal faithfulness (FF), stating that only those conditional independences that are implied by the causal Markov condition hold true. The latter is a basic postulate in common approaches to causal structure learning. The common spirit of FF and IC is to reject causal graphs for which the joint distribution looks ‘non-generic’. The difference lies in the notion of genericity: FF sometimes rejects models just because one of the CPDs is simple, for instance if the CPD describes a deterministic relation. IC does not behave in this undesirable way. It only rejects a model when there is a non-generic relation between different CPDs although each CPD looks generic when considered separately. Moreover, it detects relations between CPDs that cannot be captured by conditional independences. IC therefore helps in distinguishing causal graphs that induce the same conditional independences (i.e., they belong to the same Markov equivalence class). The usual justification for FF implicitly assumes a prior that is a probability density on the parameter space. IC can be justified by Solomonoff’s universal prior, assigning non-zero probability to those points in parameter space that have a finite description. In this way, it favours simple CPDs, and therefore respects Occam’s razor. Since Kolmogorov complexity is uncomputable, IC is not directly applicable in practice. We argue that it is nevertheless helpful, since it has already served as inspiration and justification for novel causal inference algorithms.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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What can neurons do for their brain? Communicate selectivity with bursts

Balduzzi, D., Tononi, G.

Theory in Biosciences , 132(1):27-39, Springer, March 2013 (article)

Abstract
Neurons deep in cortex interact with the environment extremely indirectly; the spikes they receive and produce are pre- and post-processed by millions of other neurons. This paper proposes two information-theoretic constraints guiding the production of spikes, that help ensure bursting activity deep in cortex relates meaningfully to events in the environment. First, neurons should emphasize selective responses with bursts. Second, neurons should propagate selective inputs by burst-firing in response to them. We show the constraints are necessary for bursts to dominate information-transfer within cortex, thereby providing a substrate allowing neurons to distribute credit amongst themselves. Finally, since synaptic plasticity degrades the ability of neurons to burst selectively, we argue that homeostatic regulation of synaptic weights is necessary, and that it is best performed offline during sleep.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Apprenticeship Learning with Few Examples

Boularias, A., Chaib-draa, B.

Neurocomputing, 104, pages: 83-96, March 2013 (article)

Abstract
We consider the problem of imitation learning when the examples, provided by an expert human, are scarce. Apprenticeship learning via inverse reinforcement learning provides an efficient tool for generalizing the examples, based on the assumption that the expert's policy maximizes a value function, which is a linear combination of state and action features. Most apprenticeship learning algorithms use only simple empirical averages of the features in the demonstrations as a statistics of the expert's policy. However, this method is efficient only when the number of examples is sufficiently large to cover most of the states, or the dynamics of the system is nearly deterministic. In this paper, we show that the quality of the learned policies is sensitive to the error in estimating the averages of the features when the dynamics of the system is stochastic. To reduce this error, we introduce two new approaches for bootstrapping the demonstrations by assuming that the expert is near-optimal and the dynamics of the system is known. In the first approach, the expert's examples are used to learn a reward function and to generate furthermore examples from the corresponding optimal policy. The second approach uses a transfer technique, known as graph homomorphism, in order to generalize the expert's actions to unvisited regions of the state space. Empirical results on simulated robot navigation problems show that our approach is able to learn sufficiently good policies from a significantly small number of examples.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


Quasi-Newton Methods: A New Direction
Quasi-Newton Methods: A New Direction

Hennig, P., Kiefel, M.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 14(1):843-865, March 2013 (article)

Abstract
Four decades after their invention, quasi-Newton methods are still state of the art in unconstrained numerical optimization. Although not usually interpreted thus, these are learning algorithms that fit a local quadratic approximation to the objective function. We show that many, including the most popular, quasi-Newton methods can be interpreted as approximations of Bayesian linear regression under varying prior assumptions. This new notion elucidates some shortcomings of classical algorithms, and lights the way to a novel nonparametric quasi-Newton method, which is able to make more efficient use of available information at computational cost similar to its predecessors.

ei ps pn

website+code pdf link (url) [BibTex]

website+code pdf link (url) [BibTex]


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Regional effects of magnetization dispersion on quantitative perfusion imaging for pulsed and continuous arterial spin labeling

Cavusoglu, M., Pohmann, R., Burger, H. C., Uludag, K.

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 69(2):524-530, Febuary 2013 (article)

Abstract
Most experiments assume a global transit delay time with blood flowing from the tagging region to the imaging slice in plug flow without any dispersion of the magnetization. However, because of cardiac pulsation, nonuniform cross-sectional flow profile, and complex vessel networks, the transit delay time is not a single value but follows a distribution. In this study, we explored the regional effects of magnetization dispersion on quantitative perfusion imaging for varying transit times within a very large interval from the direct comparison of pulsed, pseudo-continuous, and dual-coil continuous arterial spin labeling encoding schemes. Longer distances between tagging and imaging region typically used for continuous tagging schemes enhance the regional bias on the quantitative cerebral blood flow measurement causing an underestimation up to 37% when plug flow is assumed as in the standard model.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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The multivariate Watson distribution: Maximum-likelihood estimation and other aspects

Sra, S., Karp, D.

Journal of Multivariate Analysis, 114, pages: 256-269, February 2013 (article)

Abstract
This paper studies fundamental aspects of modelling data using multivariate Watson distributions. Although these distributions are natural for modelling axially symmetric data (i.e., unit vectors where View the MathML source are equivalent), for high-dimensions using them can be difficult—largely because for Watson distributions even basic tasks such as maximum-likelihood are numerically challenging. To tackle the numerical difficulties some approximations have been derived. But these are either grossly inaccurate in high-dimensions [K.V. Mardia, P. Jupp, Directional Statistics, second ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2000] or when reasonably accurate [A. Bijral, M. Breitenbach, G.Z. Grudic, Mixture of Watson distributions: a generative model for hyperspherical embeddings, in: Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, AISTATS 2007, 2007, pp. 35–42], they lack theoretical justification. We derive new approximations to the maximum-likelihood estimates; our approximations are theoretically well-defined, numerically accurate, and easy to compute. We build on our parameter estimation and discuss mixture-modelling with Watson distributions; here we uncover a hitherto unknown connection to the “diametrical clustering” algorithm of Dhillon et al. [I.S. Dhillon, E.M. Marcotte, U. Roshan, Diametrical clustering for identifying anticorrelated gene clusters, Bioinformatics 19 (13) (2003) 1612–1619].

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Action and Goal Related Decision Variables Modulate the Competition Between Multiple Potential Targets

Enachescu, V, Christopoulos, Vassilios N, Schrater, P. R., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2013), February 2013 (inproceedings)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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How the result of graph clustering methods depends on the construction of the graph

Maier, M., von Luxburg, U., Hein, M.

ESAIM: Probability & Statistics, 17, pages: 370-418, January 2013 (article)

Abstract
We study the scenario of graph-based clustering algorithms such as spectral clustering. Given a set of data points, one rst has to construct a graph on the data points and then apply a graph clustering algorithm to nd a suitable partition of the graph. Our main question is if and how the construction of the graph (choice of the graph, choice of parameters, choice of weights) in uences the outcome of the nal clustering result. To this end we study the convergence of cluster quality measures such as the normalized cut or the Cheeger cut on various kinds of random geometric graphs as the sample size tends to in nity. It turns out that the limit values of the same objective function are systematically di erent on di erent types of graphs. This implies that clustering results systematically depend on the graph and can be very di erent for di erent types of graph. We provide examples to illustrate the implications on spectral clustering.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Falsification and future performance

Balduzzi, D.

In Algorithmic Probability and Friends. Bayesian Prediction and Artificial Intelligence, 7070, pages: 65-78, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer, Berlin, Germany, Solomonoff 85th Memorial Conference, January 2013 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We information-theoretically reformulate two measures of capacity from statistical learning theory: empirical VC-entropy and empirical Rademacher complexity. We show these capacity measures count the number of hypotheses about a dataset that a learning algorithm falsifies when it finds the classifier in its repertoire minimizing empirical risk. It then follows from that the future performance of predictors on unseen data is controlled in part by how many hypotheses the learner falsifies. As a corollary we show that empirical VC-entropy quantifies the message length of the true hypothesis in the optimal code of a particular probability distribution, the so-called actual repertoire.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Explicit eigenvalues of certain scaled trigonometric matrices

Sra, S.

Linear Algebra and its Applications, 438(1):173-181, January 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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How Sensitive Is the Human Visual System to the Local Statistics of Natural Images?

Gerhard, H., Wichmann, F., Bethge, M.

PLoS Computational Biology, 9(1):e1002873, January 2013 (article)

Abstract
Several aspects of primate visual physiology have been identified as adaptations to local regularities of natural images. However, much less work has measured visual sensitivity to local natural image regularities. Most previous work focuses on global perception of large images and shows that observers are more sensitive to visual information when image properties resemble those of natural images. In this work we measure human sensitivity to local natural image regularities using stimuli generated by patch-based probabilistic natural image models that have been related to primate visual physiology. We find that human observers can learn to discriminate the statistical regularities of natural image patches from those represented by current natural image models after very few exposures and that discriminability depends on the degree of regularities captured by the model. The quick learning we observed suggests that the human visual system is biased for processing natural images, even at very fine spatial scales, and that it has a surprisingly large knowledge of the regularities in natural images, at least in comparison to the state-of-the-art statistical models of natural images.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A neural population model for visual pattern detection

Goris, R., Putzeys, T., Wagemans, J., Wichmann, F.

Psychological Review, 120(3):472–496, 2013 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Feedback Error Learning for Rhythmic Motor Primitives

Gopalan, N., Deisenroth, M., Peters, J.

In Proceedings of 2013 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2013), pages: 1317-1322, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Gaussian Process Vine Copulas for Multivariate Dependence

Lopez-Paz, D., Hernandez-Lobato, J., Ghahramani, Z.

In Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Machine Learning, W&CP 28(2), pages: 10-18, (Editors: S Dasgupta and D McAllester), JMLR, ICML, 2013, Poster: http://people.tuebingen.mpg.de/dlopez/papers/icml2013_gpvine_poster.pdf (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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The Randomized Dependence Coefficient

Lopez-Paz, D., Hennig, P., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 1-9, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges, L. Bottou, M. Welling, Z. Ghahramani, and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

ei pn

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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On a link between kernel mean maps and Fraunhofer diffraction, with an application to super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit

Harmeling, S., Hirsch, M., Schölkopf, B.

In IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, pages: 1083-1090, IEEE, CVPR, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Output Kernel Learning Methods

Dinuzzo, F., Ong, C., Fukumizu, K.

In International Workshop on Advances in Regularization, Optimization, Kernel Methods and Support Vector Machines: theory and applications, ROKS, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Alignment-based Transfer Learning for Robot Models

Bocsi, B., Csato, L., Peters, J.

In Proceedings of the 2013 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN 2013), pages: 1-7, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Accurate indel prediction using paired-end short reads

Grimm, D., Hagmann, J., Koenig, D., Weigel, D., Borgwardt, KM.

BMC Genomics, 14(132), 2013 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Nonlinear Causal Discovery for High Dimensional Data: A Kernelized Trace Method

Chen, Z., Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In 13th International Conference on Data Mining, pages: 1003-1008, (Editors: H. Xiong, G. Karypis, B. M. Thuraisingham, D. J. Cook and X. Wu), IEEE Computer Society, ICDM, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A probabilistic approach to robot trajectory generation

Paraschos, A., Neumann, G., Peters, J.

In Proceedings of the 13th IEEE International Conference on Humanoid Robots (HUMANOIDS), pages: 477-483, IEEE, 13th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Geometric optimisation on positive definite matrices for elliptically contoured distributions

Sra, S., Hosseini, R.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 2562-2570, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges and L. Bottou and M. Welling and Z. Ghahramani and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Counterfactual Reasoning and Learning Systems: The Example of Computational Advertising

Bottou, L., Peters, J., Quiñonero-Candela, J., Charles, D., Chickering, D., Portugualy, E., Ray, D., Simard, P., Snelson, E.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 14, pages: 3207-3260, 2013 (article)

ei

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Fast Probabilistic Optimization from Noisy Gradients

Hennig, P.

In Proceedings of The 30th International Conference on Machine Learning, JMLR W&CP 28(1), pages: 62–70, (Editors: S Dasgupta and D McAllester), ICML, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei pn

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Structure and Dynamics of Information Pathways in On-line Media

Gomez Rodriguez, M., Leskovec, J., Schölkopf, B.

In 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining (WSDM), pages: 23-32, (Editors: S Leonardi, A Panconesi, P Ferragina, and A Gionis), ACM, WSDM, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Evaluation and Analysis of the Performance of the EXP3 Algorithm in Stochastic Environments

Seldin, Y., Szepesvári, C., Auer, P., Abbasi-Yadkori, Y.

In Proceedings of the Tenth European Workshop on Reinforcement Learning , pages: 103-116, (Editors: MP Deisenroth and C Szepesvári and J Peters), JMLR, EWRL, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Domain adaptation under Target and Conditional Shift

Zhang, K., Schölkopf, B., Muandet, K., Wang, Z.

In Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Machine Learning, W&CP 28 (3), pages: 819–827, (Editors: S Dasgupta and D McAllester), JMLR, ICML, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]