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2016


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Contextual Policy Search for Linear and Nonlinear Generalization of a Humanoid Walking Controller

Abdolmaleki, A., Lau, N., Reis, L., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

Journal of Intelligent & Robotic Systems, 83(3-4):393-408, (Editors: Luis Almeida, Lino Marques ), September 2016, Special Issue: Autonomous Robot Systems (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

2016


DOI [BibTex]


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Acquiring and Generalizing the Embodiment Mapping from Human Observations to Robot Skills

Maeda, G., Ewerton, M., Koert, D., Peters, J.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 1(2):784-791, July 2016 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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On estimation of functional causal models: General results and application to post-nonlinear causal model

Zhang, K., Wang, Z., Zhang, J., Schölkopf, B.

ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technologies, 7(2):article no. 13, January 2016 (article)

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PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Gaussian Process-Based Predictive Control for Periodic Error Correction

Klenske, E. D., Zeilinger, M., Schölkopf, B., Hennig, P.

IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology , 24(1):110-121, 2016 (article)

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PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Modeling Confounding by Half-Sibling Regression

Schölkopf, B., Hogg, D., Wang, D., Foreman-Mackey, D., Janzing, D., Simon-Gabriel, C. J., Peters, J.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 113(27):7391-7398, 2016 (article)

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Code link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Code link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Dual Control for Approximate Bayesian Reinforcement Learning

Klenske, E. D., Hennig, P.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 17(127):1-30, 2016 (article)

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PDF link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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A Population Based Gaussian Mixture Model Incorporating 18F-FDG-PET and DW-MRI Quantifies Tumor Tissue Classes

Divine, M. R., Katiyar, P., Kohlhofer, U., Quintanilla-Martinez, L., Disselhorst, J. A., Pichler, B. J.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 57(3):473-479, 2016 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Influence of initial fixation position in scene viewing

Rothkegel, L. O. M., Trukenbrod, H. A., Schütt, H. H., Wichmann, F. A., Engbert, R.

Vision Research, 129, pages: 33-49, 2016 (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Testing models of peripheral encoding using metamerism in an oddity paradigm

Wallis, T. S. A., Bethge, M., Wichmann, F. A.

Journal of Vision, 16(2), 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Pymanopt: A Python Toolbox for Optimization on Manifolds using Automatic Differentiation

Townsend, J., Koep, N., Weichwald, S.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 17(137):1-5, 2016 (article)

ei

PDF Arxiv Code Project page link (url) [BibTex]


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A Causal, Data-driven Approach to Modeling the Kepler Data

Wang, D., Hogg, D. W., Foreman-Mackey, D., Schölkopf, B.

Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 128(967):094503, 2016 (article)

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Inference for Determining Options in Reinforcement Learning

Daniel, C., van Hoof, H., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

Machine Learning, Special Issue, 104(2):337-357, (Editors: Gärtner, T., Nanni, M., Passerini, A. and Robardet, C.), European Conference on Machine Learning im Machine Learning, Journal Track, 2016, Best Student Paper Award of ECML-PKDD 2016 (article)

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Hierarchical Relative Entropy Policy Search

Daniel, C., Neumann, G., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 17(93):1-50, 2016 (article)

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link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Painfree and accurate Bayesian estimation of psychometric functions for (potentially) overdispersed data

Schütt, H. H., Harmeling, S., Macke, J. H., Wichmann, F. A.

Vision Research, 122, pages: 105-123, 2016 (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Duality for Parallel Gibbs Sampling without Graph Coloring

Mescheder, L., Nowozin, S., Geiger, A.

Arxiv, 2016 (article)

Abstract
We present a new notion of probabilistic duality for random variables involving mixture distributions. Using this notion, we show how to implement a highly-parallelizable Gibbs sampler for weakly coupled discrete pairwise graphical models with strictly positive factors that requires almost no preprocessing and is easy to implement. Moreover, we show how our method can be combined with blocking to improve mixing. Even though our method leads to inferior mixing times compared to a sequential Gibbs sampler, we argue that our method is still very useful for large dynamic networks, where factors are added and removed on a continuous basis, as it is hard to maintain a graph coloring in this setup. Similarly, our method is useful for parallelizing Gibbs sampling in graphical models that do not allow for graph colorings with a small number of colors such as densely connected graphs.

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pdf [BibTex]


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Kernel Mean Shrinkage Estimators

Muandet, K., Sriperumbudur, B., Fukumizu, K., Gretton, A., Schölkopf, B.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 17(48):1-41, 2016 (article)

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link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Learning to Deblur

Schuler, C. J., Hirsch, M., Harmeling, S., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 38(7):1439-1451, IEEE, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Transfer Learning in Brain-Computer Interfaces

Jayaram, V., Alamgir, M., Altun, Y., Schölkopf, B., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine, 11(1):20-31, 2016 (article)

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PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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MERLiN: Mixture Effect Recovery in Linear Networks

Weichwald, S., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Gretton, A.

IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Signal Processing, 10(7):1254-1266, 2016 (article)

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Arxiv Code PDF DOI [BibTex]

Arxiv Code PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Causal inference using invariant prediction: identification and confidence intervals

Peters, J., Bühlmann, P., Meinshausen, N.

Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B (Statistical Methodology), 78(5):947-1012, 2016, (with discussion) (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Causal discovery and inference: concepts and recent methodological advances

Spirtes, P., Zhang, K.

Applied Informatics, 3(3):1-28, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Self-regulation of brain rhythms in the precuneus: a novel BCI paradigm for patients with ALS

Fomina, T., Lohmann, G., Erb, M., Ethofer, T., Schölkopf, B., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

Journal of Neural Engineering, 13(6):066021, 2016 (article)

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Influence Estimation and Maximization in Continuous-Time Diffusion Networks

Gomez-Rodriguez, M., Song, L., Du, N., Zha, H., Schölkopf, B.

ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 34(2):9:1-9:33, 2016 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Bootstrat: Population Informed Bootstrapping for Rare Variant Tests

Huang, H., Peloso, G. M., Howrigan, D., Rakitsch, B., Simon-Gabriel, C. J., Goldstein, J. I., Daly, M. J., Borgwardt, K., Neale, B. M.

bioRxiv, 2016, preprint (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Movement Models Show that Postural Control Precedes and Predicts Volitional Motor Control

Rueckert, E., Camernik, J., Peters, J., Babic, J.

Nature PG: Scientific Reports, 6(Article number: 28455), 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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An overview of quantitative approaches in Gestalt perception

Jäkel, F., Singh, M., Wichmann, F. A., Herzog, M. H.

Vision Research, 126, pages: 3-8, 2016 (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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The population of long-period transiting exoplanets

Foreman-Mackey, D., Morton, T. D., Hogg, D. W., Agol, E., Schölkopf, B.

The Astronomical Journal, 152(6):206, 2016 (article)

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link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Learning Taxonomy Adaptation in Large-scale Classification

Babbar, R., Partalas, I., Gaussier, E., Amini, M., Amblard, C.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 17(98):1-37, 2016 (article)

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Recurrent Spiking Networks Solve Planning Tasks

Rueckert, E., Kappel, D., Tanneberg, D., Pecevski, D., Peters, J.

Nature PG: Scientific Reports, 6(Article number: 21142), 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Map-Based Probabilistic Visual Self-Localization

Brubaker, M. A., Geiger, A., Urtasun, R.

IEEE Trans. on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (PAMI), 2016 (article)

Abstract
Accurate and efficient self-localization is a critical problem for autonomous systems. This paper describes an affordable solution to vehicle self-localization which uses odometry computed from two video cameras and road maps as the sole inputs. The core of the method is a probabilistic model for which an efficient approximate inference algorithm is derived. The inference algorithm is able to utilize distributed computation in order to meet the real-time requirements of autonomous systems in some instances. Because of the probabilistic nature of the model the method is capable of coping with various sources of uncertainty including noise in the visual odometry and inherent ambiguities in the map (e.g., in a Manhattan world). By exploiting freely available, community developed maps and visual odometry measurements, the proposed method is able to localize a vehicle to 4m on average after 52 seconds of driving on maps which contain more than 2,150km of drivable roads.

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pdf Project Page [BibTex]

pdf Project Page [BibTex]


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BOiS—Berlin Object in Scene Database: Controlled Photographic Images for Visual Search Experiments with Quantified Contextual Priors

Mohr, J., Seyfarth, J., Lueschow, A., Weber, J. E., Wichmann, F. A., Obermayer, K.

Frontiers in Psychology, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Preface to the ACM TIST Special Issue on Causal Discovery and Inference

Zhang, K., Li, J., Bareinboim, E., Schölkopf, B., Pearl, J.

ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technologies, 7(2):article no. 17, 2016 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Bio-inspired feedback-circuit implementation of discrete, free energy optimizing, winner-take-all computations

Genewein, T, Braun, DA

Biological Cybernetics, 110(2):135–150, June 2016 (article)

Abstract
Bayesian inference and bounded rational decision-making require the accumulation of evidence or utility, respectively, to transform a prior belief or strategy into a posterior probability distribution over hypotheses or actions. Crucially, this process cannot be simply realized by independent integrators, since the different hypotheses and actions also compete with each other. In continuous time, this competitive integration process can be described by a special case of the replicator equation. Here we investigate simple analog electric circuits that implement the underlying differential equation under the constraint that we only permit a limited set of building blocks that we regard as biologically interpretable, such as capacitors, resistors, voltage-dependent conductances and voltage- or current-controlled current and voltage sources. The appeal of these circuits is that they intrinsically perform normalization without requiring an explicit divisive normalization. However, even in idealized simulations, we find that these circuits are very sensitive to internal noise as they accumulate error over time. We discuss in how far neural circuits could implement these operations that might provide a generic competitive principle underlying both perception and action.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Decision-Making under Ambiguity Is Modulated by Visual Framing, but Not by Motor vs. Non-Motor Context: Experiments and an Information-Theoretic Ambiguity Model

Grau-Moya, J, Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

PLoS ONE, 11(4):1-21, April 2016 (article)

Abstract
A number of recent studies have investigated differences in human choice behavior depending on task framing, especially comparing economic decision-making to choice behavior in equivalent sensorimotor tasks. Here we test whether decision-making under ambiguity exhibits effects of task framing in motor vs. non-motor context. In a first experiment, we designed an experience-based urn task with varying degrees of ambiguity and an equivalent motor task where subjects chose between hitting partially occluded targets. In a second experiment, we controlled for the different stimulus design in the two tasks by introducing an urn task with bar stimuli matching those in the motor task. We found ambiguity attitudes to be mainly influenced by stimulus design. In particular, we found that the same subjects tended to be ambiguity-preferring when choosing between ambiguous bar stimuli, but ambiguity-avoiding when choosing between ambiguous urn sample stimuli. In contrast, subjects’ choice pattern was not affected by changing from a target hitting task to a non-motor context when keeping the stimulus design unchanged. In both tasks subjects’ choice behavior was continuously modulated by the degree of ambiguity. We show that this modulation of behavior can be explained by an information-theoretic model of ambiguity that generalizes Bayes-optimal decision-making by combining Bayesian inference with robust decision-making under model uncertainty. Our results demonstrate the benefits of information-theoretic models of decision-making under varying degrees of ambiguity for a given context, but also demonstrate the sensitivity of ambiguity attitudes across contexts that theoretical models struggle to explain.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

2008


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Modelling contrast discrimination data suggest both the pedestal effect and stochastic resonance to be caused by the same mechanism

Goris, R., Wagemans, J., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 8(15):1-21, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Computational models of spatial vision typically make use of a (rectified) linear filter, a nonlinearity and dominant late noise to account for human contrast discrimination data. Linear–nonlinear cascade models predict an improvement in observers' contrast detection performance when low, subthreshold levels of external noise are added (i.e., stochastic resonance). Here, we address the issue whether a single contrast gain-control model of early spatial vision can account for both the pedestal effect, i.e., the improved detectability of a grating in the presence of a low-contrast masking grating, and stochastic resonance. We measured contrast discrimination performance without noise and in both weak and moderate levels of noise. Making use of a full quantitative description of our data with few parameters combined with comprehensive model selection assessments, we show the pedestal effect to be more reduced in the presence of weak noise than in moderate noise. This reduction rules out independent, additive sources of performance improvement and, together with a simulation study, supports the parsimonious explanation that a single mechanism underlies the pedestal effect and stochastic resonance in contrast perception.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]


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gBoost: A Mathematical Programming Approach to Graph Classification and Regression

Saigo, H., Nowozin, S., Kadowaki, T., Kudo, T., Tsuda, K.

Machine Learning, 75(1):69-89, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Graph mining methods enumerate frequently appearing subgraph patterns, which can be used as features for subsequent classification or regression. However, frequent patterns are not necessarily informative for the given learning problem. We propose a mathematical programming boosting method (gBoost) that progressively collects informative patterns. Compared to AdaBoost, gBoost can build the prediction rule with fewer iterations. To apply the boosting method to graph data, a branch-and-bound pattern search algorithm is developed based on the DFS code tree. The constructed search space is reused in later iterations to minimize the computation time. Our method can learn more efficiently than the simpler method based on frequent substructure mining, because the output labels are used as an extra information source for pruning the search space. Furthermore, by engineering the mathematical program, a wide range of machine learning problems can be solved without modifying the pattern search algorithm.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Machine Learning for Motor Skills in Robotics

Peters, J.

K{\"u}nstliche Intelligenz, 2008(4):41-43, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Autonomous robots that can adapt to novel situations has been a long standing vision of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. Early approaches to this goal during the heydays of artificial intelligence research in the late 1980s, however, made it clear that an approach purely based on reasoning or human insights would not be able to model all the perceptuomotor tasks of future robots. Instead, new hope was put in the growing wake of machine learning that promised fully adaptive control algorithms which learn both by observation and trial-and-error. However, to date, learning techniques have yet to fulfill this promise as only few methods manage to scale into the high-dimensional domains of manipulator and humanoid robotics and usually scaling was only achieved in precisely pre-structured domains. We have investigated the ingredients for a general approach to motor skill learning in order to get one step closer towards human-like performance. For doing so, we study two major components for such an approach, i.e., firstly, a theoretically well-founded general approach to representing the required control structures for task representation and execution and, secondly, appropriate learning algorithms which can be applied in this setting.

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PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernels, Regularization and Differential Equations

Steinke, F., Schölkopf, B.

Pattern Recognition, 41(11):3271-3286, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Many common machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines or Gaussian process inference make use of positive definite kernels, reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, Gaussian processes, and regularization operators. In this work these objects are presented in a general, unifying framework, and interrelations are highlighted. With this in mind we then show how linear stochastic differential equation models can be incorporated naturally into the kernel framework. And vice versa, many kernel machines can be interpreted in terms of differential equations. We focus especially on ordinary differential equations, also known as dynamical systems, and it is shown that standard kernel inference algorithms are equivalent to Kalman filter methods based on such models. In order not to cloud qualitative insights with heavy mathematical machinery, we restrict ourselves to finite domains, implying that differential equations are treated via their corresponding finite difference equations.

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PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Mixture Models for Protein Structure Ensembles

Hirsch, M., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 24(19):2184-2192, October 2008 (article)

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Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Structure of the human voltage-dependent anion channel

Bayrhuber, M., Meins, T., Habeck, M., Becker, S., Giller, K., Villinger, S., Vonrhein, C., Griesinger, C., Zweckstetter, M., Zeth, K.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105(40):15370-15375, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), also known as mitochondrial porin, is the most abundant protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). VDAC is the channel known to guide the metabolic flux across the MOM and plays a key role in mitochondrially induced apoptosis. Here, we present the 3D structure of human VDAC1, which was solved conjointly by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Human VDAC1 (hVDAC1) adopts a β-barrel architecture composed of 19 β-strands with an α-helix located horizontally midway within the pore. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that this channel architecture is common to all VDAC proteins and is adopted by the general import pore TOM40 of mammals, which is also located in the MOM.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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MRI-Based Attenuation Correction for PET/MRI: A Novel Approach Combining Pattern Recognition and Atlas Registration

Hofmann, M., Steinke, F., Scheel, V., Charpiat, G., Farquhar, J., Aschoff, P., Brady, M., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 49(11):1875-1883, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
For quantitative PET information, correction of tissue photon attenuation is mandatory. Generally in conventional PET, the attenuation map is obtained from a transmission scan, which uses a rotating radionuclide source, or from the CT scan in a combined PET/CT scanner. In the case of PET/MRI scanners currently under development, insufficient space for the rotating source exists; the attenuation map can be calculated from the MR image instead. This task is challenging because MR intensities correlate with proton densities and tissue-relaxation properties, rather than with attenuation-related mass density. METHODS: We used a combination of local pattern recognition and atlas registration, which captures global variation of anatomy, to predict pseudo-CT images from a given MR image. These pseudo-CT images were then used for attenuation correction, as the process would be performed in a PET/CT scanner. RESULTS: For human brain scans, we show on a database of 17 MR/CT image pairs that our method reliably enables e stimation of a pseudo-CT image from the MR image alone. On additional datasets of MRI/PET/CT triplets of human brain scans, we compare MRI-based attenuation correction with CT-based correction. Our approach enables PET quantification with a mean error of 3.2% for predefined regions of interest, which we found to be clinically not significant. However, our method is not specific to brain imaging, and we show promising initial results on 1 whole-body animal dataset. CONCLUSION: This method allows reliable MRI-based attenuation correction for human brain scans. Further work is necessary to validate the method for whole-body imaging.

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Web DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines and Kernels for Computational Biology

Ben-Hur, A., Ong, C., Sonnenburg, S., Schölkopf, B., Rätsch, G.

PLoS Computational Biology, 4(10: e1000173):1-10, October 2008 (article)

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PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Approximations for Binary Gaussian Process Classification

Nickisch, H., Rasmussen, C.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 9, pages: 2035-2078, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
We provide a comprehensive overview of many recent algorithms for approximate inference in Gaussian process models for probabilistic binary classification. The relationships between several approaches are elucidated theoretically, and the properties of the different algorithms are corroborated by experimental results. We examine both 1) the quality of the predictive distributions and 2) the suitability of the different marginal likelihood approximations for model selection (selecting hyperparameters) and compare to a gold standard based on MCMC. Interestingly, some methods produce good predictive distributions although their marginal likelihood approximations are poor. Strong conclusions are drawn about the methods: The Expectation Propagation algorithm is almost always the method of choice unless the computational budget is very tight. We also extend existing methods in various ways, and provide unifying code implementing all approaches.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Accurate NMR Structures Through Minimization of an Extended Hybrid Energy

Nilges, M., Bernard, A., Bardiaux, B., Malliavin, T., Habeck, M., Rieping, W.

Structure, 16(9):1305-1312, September 2008 (article)

Abstract
The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X–ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications—for example, in homology modeling.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Similarity, Kernels, and the Triangle Inequality

Jäkel, F., Schölkopf, B., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 52(5):297-303, September 2008 (article)

Abstract
Similarity is used as an explanatory construct throughout psychology and multidimensional scaling (MDS) is the most popular way to assess similarity. In MDS, similarity is intimately connected to the idea of a geometric representation of stimuli in a perceptual space. Whilst connecting similarity and closeness of stimuli in a geometric representation may be intuitively plausible, Tversky and Gati [Tversky, A., Gati, I. (1982). Similarity, separability, and the triangle inequality. Psychological Review, 89(2), 123–154] have reported data which are inconsistent with the usual geometric representations that are based on segmental additivity. We show that similarity measures based on Shepard’s universal law of generalization [Shepard, R. N. (1987). Toward a universal law of generalization for psychologica science. Science, 237(4820), 1317–1323] lead to an inner product representation in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. In such a space stimuli are represented by their similarity to all other stimuli. This representation, based on Shepard’s law, has a natural metric that does not have additive segments whilst still retaining the intuitive notion of connecting similarity and distance between stimuli. Furthermore, this representation has the psychologically appealing property that the distance between stimuli is bounded.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]