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2017


Probabilistic Line Searches for Stochastic Optimization
Probabilistic Line Searches for Stochastic Optimization

Mahsereci, M., Hennig, P.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 18(119):1-59, November 2017 (article)

pn

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

2017


link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Generalized exploration in policy search

van Hoof, H., Tanneberg, D., Peters, J.

Machine Learning, 106(9-10):1705-1724 , (Editors: Kurt Driessens, Dragi Kocev, Marko Robnik‐Sikonja, and Myra Spiliopoulou), October 2017, Special Issue of the ECML PKDD 2017 Journal Track (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Prioritization of Movement Primitives

Paraschos, A., Lioutikov, R., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Robot Systems, and IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters (RA-L), 2(4):2294-2301, October 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Learning Movement Primitive Libraries through Probabilistic Segmentation

Lioutikov, R., Neumann, G., Maeda, G., Peters, J.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 36(8):879-894, July 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Guiding Trajectory Optimization by Demonstrated Distributions

Osa, T., Ghalamzan E., A. M., Stolkin, R., Lioutikov, R., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 2(2):819-826, April 2017 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Whole-body multi-contact motion in humans and humanoids: Advances of the CoDyCo European project

Padois, V., Ivaldi, S., Babic, J., Mistry, M., Peters, J., Nori, F.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 90, pages: 97-117, April 2017, Special Issue on New Research Frontiers for Intelligent Autonomous Systems (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Movement Primitives for Coordination of Multiple Human-Robot Collaborative Tasks

Maeda, G., Neumann, G., Ewerton, M., Lioutikov, R., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

Autonomous Robots, 41(3):593-612, March 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Bioinspired tactile sensor for surface roughness discrimination

Yi, Z., Zhang, Y., Peters, J.

Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, 255, pages: 46-53, March 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Model-based Contextual Policy Search for Data-Efficient Generalization of Robot Skills

Kupcsik, A., Deisenroth, M., Peters, J., Ai Poh, L., Vadakkepat, V., Neumann, G.

Artificial Intelligence, 247, pages: 415-439, 2017, Special Issue on AI and Robotics (article)

ei

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Anticipatory Action Selection for Human-Robot Table Tennis

Wang, Z., Boularias, A., Mülling, K., Schölkopf, B., Peters, J.

Artificial Intelligence, 247, pages: 399-414, 2017, Special Issue on AI and Robotics (article)

Abstract
Abstract Anticipation can enhance the capability of a robot in its interaction with humans, where the robot predicts the humans' intention for selecting its own action. We present a novel framework of anticipatory action selection for human-robot interaction, which is capable to handle nonlinear and stochastic human behaviors such as table tennis strokes and allows the robot to choose the optimal action based on prediction of the human partner's intention with uncertainty. The presented framework is generic and can be used in many human-robot interaction scenarios, for example, in navigation and human-robot co-manipulation. In this article, we conduct a case study on human-robot table tennis. Due to the limited amount of time for executing hitting movements, a robot usually needs to initiate its hitting movement before the opponent hits the ball, which requires the robot to be anticipatory based on visual observation of the opponent's movement. Previous work on Intention-Driven Dynamics Models (IDDM) allowed the robot to predict the intended target of the opponent. In this article, we address the problem of action selection and optimal timing for initiating a chosen action by formulating the anticipatory action selection as a Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP), where the transition and observation are modeled by the \{IDDM\} framework. We present two approaches to anticipatory action selection based on the \{POMDP\} formulation, i.e., a model-free policy learning method based on Least-Squares Policy Iteration (LSPI) that employs the \{IDDM\} for belief updates, and a model-based Monte-Carlo Planning (MCP) method, which benefits from the transition and observation model by the IDDM. Experimental results using real data in a simulated environment show the importance of anticipatory action selection, and that \{POMDPs\} are suitable to formulate the anticipatory action selection problem by taking into account the uncertainties in prediction. We also show that existing algorithms for POMDPs, such as \{LSPI\} and MCP, can be applied to substantially improve the robot's performance in its interaction with humans.

am ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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easyGWAS: A Cloud-based Platform for Comparing the Results of Genome-wide Association Studies

Grimm, D., Roqueiro, D., Salome, P., Kleeberger, S., Greshake, B., Zhu, W., Liu, C., Lippert, C., Stegle, O., Schölkopf, B., Weigel, D., Borgwardt, K.

The Plant Cell, 29(1):5-19, 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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A Novel Unsupervised Segmentation Approach Quantifies Tumor Tissue Populations Using Multiparametric MRI: First Results with Histological Validation

Katiyar, P., Divine, M. R., Kohlhofer, U., Quintanilla-Martinez, L., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B. J., Disselhorst, J. A.

Molecular Imaging and Biology, 19(3):391-397, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Early Stopping Without a Validation Set
Early Stopping Without a Validation Set

Mahsereci, M., Balles, L., Lassner, C., Hennig, P.

arXiv preprint arXiv:1703.09580, 2017 (article)

Abstract
Early stopping is a widely used technique to prevent poor generalization performance when training an over-expressive model by means of gradient-based optimization. To find a good point to halt the optimizer, a common practice is to split the dataset into a training and a smaller validation set to obtain an ongoing estimate of the generalization performance. In this paper we propose a novel early stopping criterion which is based on fast-to-compute, local statistics of the computed gradients and entirely removes the need for a held-out validation set. Our experiments show that this is a viable approach in the setting of least-squares and logistic regression as well as neural networks.

ps pn

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Krylov Subspace Recycling for Fast Iterative Least-Squares in Machine Learning

Roos, F. D., Hennig, P.

arXiv preprint arXiv:1706.00241, 2017 (article)

Abstract
Solving symmetric positive definite linear problems is a fundamental computational task in machine learning. The exact solution, famously, is cubicly expensive in the size of the matrix. To alleviate this problem, several linear-time approximations, such as spectral and inducing-point methods, have been suggested and are now in wide use. These are low-rank approximations that choose the low-rank space a priori and do not refine it over time. While this allows linear cost in the data-set size, it also causes a finite, uncorrected approximation error. Authors from numerical linear algebra have explored ways to iteratively refine such low-rank approximations, at a cost of a small number of matrix-vector multiplications. This idea is particularly interesting in the many situations in machine learning where one has to solve a sequence of related symmetric positive definite linear problems. From the machine learning perspective, such deflation methods can be interpreted as transfer learning of a low-rank approximation across a time-series of numerical tasks. We study the use of such methods for our field. Our empirical results show that, on regression and classification problems of intermediate size, this approach can interpolate between low computational cost and numerical precision.

pn

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Minimax Estimation of Kernel Mean Embeddings

Tolstikhin, I., Sriperumbudur, B., Muandet, K.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 18(86):1-47, 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Kernel Mean Embedding of Distributions: A Review and Beyond

Muandet, K., Fukumizu, K., Sriperumbudur, B., Schölkopf, B.

Foundations and Trends in Machine Learning, 10(1-2):1-141, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Convergence Analysis of Deterministic Kernel-Based Quadrature Rules in Misspecified Settings

Kanagawa, M., Sriperumbudur, B. K., Fukumizu, K.

Arxiv e-prints, arXiv:1709.00147v1 [math.NA], 2017 (article)

Abstract
This paper presents convergence analysis of kernel-based quadrature rules in misspecified settings, focusing on deterministic quadrature in Sobolev spaces. In particular, we deal with misspecified settings where a test integrand is less smooth than a Sobolev RKHS based on which a quadrature rule is constructed. We provide convergence guarantees based on two different assumptions on a quadrature rule: one on quadrature weights, and the other on design points. More precisely, we show that convergence rates can be derived (i) if the sum of absolute weights remains constant (or does not increase quickly), or (ii) if the minimum distance between distance design points does not decrease very quickly. As a consequence of the latter result, we derive a rate of convergence for Bayesian quadrature in misspecified settings. We reveal a condition on design points to make Bayesian quadrature robust to misspecification, and show that, under this condition, it may adaptively achieve the optimal rate of convergence in the Sobolev space of a lesser order (i.e., of the unknown smoothness of a test integrand), under a slightly stronger regularity condition on the integrand.

pn

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Prediction of intention during interaction with iCub with Probabilistic Movement Primitives

Dermy, O., Paraschos, A., Ewerton, M., Charpillet, F., Peters, J., Ivaldi, S.

Frontiers in Robotics and AI, 4, pages: 45, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Manifold-based multi-objective policy search with sample reuse

Parisi, S., Pirotta, M., Peters, J.

Neurocomputing, 263, pages: 3-14, (Editors: Madalina Drugan, Marco Wiering, Peter Vamplew, and Madhu Chetty), 2017, Special Issue on Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Spectral Clustering predicts tumor tissue heterogeneity using dynamic 18F-FDG PET: a complement to the standard compartmental modeling approach

Katiyar, P., Divine, M. R., Kohlhofer, U., Quintanilla-Martinez, L., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B. J., Disselhorst, J. A.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 58(4):651-657, 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Electroencephalographic identifiers of motor adaptation learning

Ozdenizci, O., Yalcin, M., Erdogan, A., Patoglu, V., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Cetin, M.

Journal of Neural Engineering, 14(4):046027, 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Detecting distortions of peripherally presented letter stimuli under crowded conditions

Wallis, T. S. A., Tobias, S., Bethge, M., Wichmann, F. A.

Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 79(3):850-862, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Temporal evolution of the central fixation bias in scene viewing

Rothkegel, L. O. M., Trukenbrod, H. A., Schütt, H. H., Wichmann, F. A., Engbert, R.

Journal of Vision, 17(13):3, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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BundleMAP: Anatomically Localized Classification, Regression, and Hypothesis Testing in Diffusion MRI

Khatami, M., Schmidt-Wilcke, T., Sundgren, P. C., Abbasloo, A., Schölkopf, B., Schultz, T.

Pattern Recognition, 63, pages: 593-600, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A parametric texture model based on deep convolutional features closely matches texture appearance for humans

Wallis, T. S. A., Funke, C. M., Ecker, A. S., Gatys, L. A., Wichmann, F. A., Bethge, M.

Journal of Vision, 17(12), 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Model Selection for Gaussian Mixture Models

Huang, T., Peng, H., Zhang, K.

Statistica Sinica, 27(1):147-169, 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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An image-computable psychophysical spatial vision model

Schütt, H. H., Wichmann, F. A.

Journal of Vision, 17(12), 2017 (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Methods and measurements to compare men against machines

Wichmann, F. A., Janssen, D. H. J., Geirhos, R., Aguilar, G., Schütt, H. H., Maertens, M., Bethge, M.

Electronic Imaging, pages: 36-45(10), 2017 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Comparison of Autoregressive Hidden Markov Models for Multimodal Manipulations With Variable Masses

Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 2(2):1101-1108, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Phase Estimation for Fast Action Recognition and Trajectory Generation in Human-Robot Collaboration

Maeda, G., Ewerton, M., Neumann, G., Lioutikov, R., Peters, J.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 36(13-14):1579-1594, 2017, Special Issue on the Seventeenth International Symposium on Robotics Research (article)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A Phase-coded Aperture Camera with Programmable Optics

Chen, J., Hirsch, M., Heintzmann, R., Eberhardt, B., Lensch, H. P. A.

Electronic Imaging, 2017(17):70-75, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Efficiency of analytical and sampling-based uncertainty propagation in intensity-modulated proton therapy

Wahl, N., Hennig, P., Wieser, H. P., Bangert, M.

Physics in Medicine & Biology, 62(14):5790-5807, 2017 (article)

Abstract
The sensitivity of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans to uncertainties can be quantified and mitigated with robust/min-max and stochastic/probabilistic treatment analysis and optimization techniques. Those methods usually rely on sparse random, importance, or worst-case sampling. Inevitably, this imposes a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy of the uncertainty propagation. Here, we investigate analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) as an alternative for uncertainty propagation and minimization in IMPT that does not rely on scenario sampling. APM propagates probability distributions over range and setup uncertainties via a Gaussian pencil-beam approximation into moments of the probability distributions over the resulting dose in closed form. It supports arbitrary correlation models and allows for efficient incorporation of fractionation effects regarding random and systematic errors. We evaluate the trade-off between run-time and accuracy of APM uncertainty computations on three patient datasets. Results are compared against reference computations facilitating importance and random sampling. Two approximation techniques to accelerate uncertainty propagation and minimization based on probabilistic treatment plan optimization are presented. Runtimes are measured on CPU and GPU platforms, dosimetric accuracy is quantified in comparison to a sampling-based benchmark (5000 random samples). APM accurately propagates range and setup uncertainties into dose uncertainties at competitive run-times (GPU ##IMG## [http://ej.iop.org/images/0031-9155/62/14/5790/pmbaa6ec5ieqn001.gif] {$\leqslant {5}$} min). The resulting standard deviation (expectation value) of dose show average global ##IMG## [http://ej.iop.org/images/0031-9155/62/14/5790/pmbaa6ec5ieqn002.gif] {$\gamma_{{3}\% / {3}~{\rm mm}}$} pass rates between 94.2% and 99.9% (98.4% and 100.0%). All investigated importance sampling strategies provided less accuracy at higher run-times considering only a single fraction. Considering fractionation, APM uncertainty propagation and treatment plan optimization was proven to be possible at constant time complexity, while run-times of sampling-based computations are linear in the number of fractions. Using sum sampling within APM, uncertainty propagation can only be accelerated at the cost of reduced accuracy in variance calculations. For probabilistic plan optimization, we were able to approximate the necessary pre-computations within seconds, yielding treatment plans of similar quality as gained from exact uncertainty propagation. APM is suited to enhance the trade-off between speed and accuracy in uncertainty propagation and probabilistic treatment plan optimization, especially in the context of fractionation. This brings fully-fledged APM computations within reach of clinical application.

pn

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Analytical probabilistic modeling of RBE-weighted dose for ion therapy

Wieser, H., Hennig, P., Wahl, N., Bangert, M.

Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), 62(23):8959-8982, 2017 (article)

pn

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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On Maximum Entropy and Inference

Gresele, L., Marsili, M.

Entropy, 19(12):article no. 642, 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Towards Engagement Models that Consider Individual Factors in HRI: On the Relation of Extroversion and Negative Attitude Towards Robots to Gaze and Speech During a Human-Robot Assembly Task

Ivaldi, S., Lefort, S., Peters, J., Chetouani, M., Provasi, J., Zibetti, E.

International Journal of Social Robotics, 9(1):63-86, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Non-parametric Policy Search with Limited Information Loss

van Hoof, H., Neumann, G., Peters, J.

Journal of Machine Learning Research , 18(73):1-46, 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Stability of Controllers for Gaussian Process Dynamics

Vinogradska, J., Bischoff, B., Nguyen-Tuong, D., Peters, J.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 18(100):1-37, 2017 (article)

ei

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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SUV-quantification of physiological lung tissue in an integrated PET/MR-system: Impact of lung density and bone tissue

Seith, F., Schmidt, H., Gatidis, S., Bezrukov, I., Schraml, C., Pfannenberg, C., la Fougère, C., Nikolaou, K., Schwenzer, N.

PLOS ONE, 12(5):1-13, 2017 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2008


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Modelling contrast discrimination data suggest both the pedestal effect and stochastic resonance to be caused by the same mechanism

Goris, R., Wagemans, J., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 8(15):1-21, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Computational models of spatial vision typically make use of a (rectified) linear filter, a nonlinearity and dominant late noise to account for human contrast discrimination data. Linear–nonlinear cascade models predict an improvement in observers' contrast detection performance when low, subthreshold levels of external noise are added (i.e., stochastic resonance). Here, we address the issue whether a single contrast gain-control model of early spatial vision can account for both the pedestal effect, i.e., the improved detectability of a grating in the presence of a low-contrast masking grating, and stochastic resonance. We measured contrast discrimination performance without noise and in both weak and moderate levels of noise. Making use of a full quantitative description of our data with few parameters combined with comprehensive model selection assessments, we show the pedestal effect to be more reduced in the presence of weak noise than in moderate noise. This reduction rules out independent, additive sources of performance improvement and, together with a simulation study, supports the parsimonious explanation that a single mechanism underlies the pedestal effect and stochastic resonance in contrast perception.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]


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gBoost: A Mathematical Programming Approach to Graph Classification and Regression

Saigo, H., Nowozin, S., Kadowaki, T., Kudo, T., Tsuda, K.

Machine Learning, 75(1):69-89, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Graph mining methods enumerate frequently appearing subgraph patterns, which can be used as features for subsequent classification or regression. However, frequent patterns are not necessarily informative for the given learning problem. We propose a mathematical programming boosting method (gBoost) that progressively collects informative patterns. Compared to AdaBoost, gBoost can build the prediction rule with fewer iterations. To apply the boosting method to graph data, a branch-and-bound pattern search algorithm is developed based on the DFS code tree. The constructed search space is reused in later iterations to minimize the computation time. Our method can learn more efficiently than the simpler method based on frequent substructure mining, because the output labels are used as an extra information source for pruning the search space. Furthermore, by engineering the mathematical program, a wide range of machine learning problems can be solved without modifying the pattern search algorithm.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Machine Learning for Motor Skills in Robotics

Peters, J.

K{\"u}nstliche Intelligenz, 2008(4):41-43, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Autonomous robots that can adapt to novel situations has been a long standing vision of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. Early approaches to this goal during the heydays of artificial intelligence research in the late 1980s, however, made it clear that an approach purely based on reasoning or human insights would not be able to model all the perceptuomotor tasks of future robots. Instead, new hope was put in the growing wake of machine learning that promised fully adaptive control algorithms which learn both by observation and trial-and-error. However, to date, learning techniques have yet to fulfill this promise as only few methods manage to scale into the high-dimensional domains of manipulator and humanoid robotics and usually scaling was only achieved in precisely pre-structured domains. We have investigated the ingredients for a general approach to motor skill learning in order to get one step closer towards human-like performance. For doing so, we study two major components for such an approach, i.e., firstly, a theoretically well-founded general approach to representing the required control structures for task representation and execution and, secondly, appropriate learning algorithms which can be applied in this setting.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernels, Regularization and Differential Equations

Steinke, F., Schölkopf, B.

Pattern Recognition, 41(11):3271-3286, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Many common machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines or Gaussian process inference make use of positive definite kernels, reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, Gaussian processes, and regularization operators. In this work these objects are presented in a general, unifying framework, and interrelations are highlighted. With this in mind we then show how linear stochastic differential equation models can be incorporated naturally into the kernel framework. And vice versa, many kernel machines can be interpreted in terms of differential equations. We focus especially on ordinary differential equations, also known as dynamical systems, and it is shown that standard kernel inference algorithms are equivalent to Kalman filter methods based on such models. In order not to cloud qualitative insights with heavy mathematical machinery, we restrict ourselves to finite domains, implying that differential equations are treated via their corresponding finite difference equations.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Mixture Models for Protein Structure Ensembles

Hirsch, M., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 24(19):2184-2192, October 2008 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Structure of the human voltage-dependent anion channel

Bayrhuber, M., Meins, T., Habeck, M., Becker, S., Giller, K., Villinger, S., Vonrhein, C., Griesinger, C., Zweckstetter, M., Zeth, K.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105(40):15370-15375, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), also known as mitochondrial porin, is the most abundant protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). VDAC is the channel known to guide the metabolic flux across the MOM and plays a key role in mitochondrially induced apoptosis. Here, we present the 3D structure of human VDAC1, which was solved conjointly by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Human VDAC1 (hVDAC1) adopts a β-barrel architecture composed of 19 β-strands with an α-helix located horizontally midway within the pore. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that this channel architecture is common to all VDAC proteins and is adopted by the general import pore TOM40 of mammals, which is also located in the MOM.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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MRI-Based Attenuation Correction for PET/MRI: A Novel Approach Combining Pattern Recognition and Atlas Registration

Hofmann, M., Steinke, F., Scheel, V., Charpiat, G., Farquhar, J., Aschoff, P., Brady, M., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 49(11):1875-1883, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
For quantitative PET information, correction of tissue photon attenuation is mandatory. Generally in conventional PET, the attenuation map is obtained from a transmission scan, which uses a rotating radionuclide source, or from the CT scan in a combined PET/CT scanner. In the case of PET/MRI scanners currently under development, insufficient space for the rotating source exists; the attenuation map can be calculated from the MR image instead. This task is challenging because MR intensities correlate with proton densities and tissue-relaxation properties, rather than with attenuation-related mass density. METHODS: We used a combination of local pattern recognition and atlas registration, which captures global variation of anatomy, to predict pseudo-CT images from a given MR image. These pseudo-CT images were then used for attenuation correction, as the process would be performed in a PET/CT scanner. RESULTS: For human brain scans, we show on a database of 17 MR/CT image pairs that our method reliably enables e stimation of a pseudo-CT image from the MR image alone. On additional datasets of MRI/PET/CT triplets of human brain scans, we compare MRI-based attenuation correction with CT-based correction. Our approach enables PET quantification with a mean error of 3.2% for predefined regions of interest, which we found to be clinically not significant. However, our method is not specific to brain imaging, and we show promising initial results on 1 whole-body animal dataset. CONCLUSION: This method allows reliable MRI-based attenuation correction for human brain scans. Further work is necessary to validate the method for whole-body imaging.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines and Kernels for Computational Biology

Ben-Hur, A., Ong, C., Sonnenburg, S., Schölkopf, B., Rätsch, G.

PLoS Computational Biology, 4(10: e1000173):1-10, October 2008 (article)

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]