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2013


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A Practical System For Recording Instrument Interactions During Live Robotic Surgery

McMahan, W., Gomez, E. D., Chen, L., Bark, K., Nappo, J. C., Koch, E. I., Lee, D. I., Dumon, K., Williams, N., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Journal of Robotic Surgery, 7(4):351-358, 2013 (article)

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[BibTex]

2013


[BibTex]


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Vibrotactile Display: Perception, Technology, and Applications

Choi, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Proceedings of the IEEE, 101(9):2093-2104, sep 2013 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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ROS Open-source Audio Recognizer: ROAR Environmental Sound Detection Tools for Robot Programming

Romano, J. M., Brindza, J. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Autonomous Robots, 34(3):207-215, April 2013 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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In Vivo Validation of a System for Haptic Feedback of Tool Vibrations in Robotic Surgery

Bark, K., McMahan, W., Remington, A., Gewirtz, J., Wedmid, A., Lee, D. I., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 27(2):656-664, February 2013, dynamic article (paper plus video), available at \href{http://www.springerlink.com/content/417j532708417342/}{http://www.springerlink.com/content/417j532708417342/} (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Perception of Springs with Visual and Proprioceptive Motion Cues: Implications for Prosthetics

Gurari, N., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Okamura, A. M.

IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems, 43, pages: 102-114, January 2013, \href{http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBRw87Wk29E\&feature=youtu.be}{Video} (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Motor Control Adaptation to Changes in Robot Body Dynamics for a Compliant Quadruped Robot
Motor Control Adaptation to Changes in Robot Body Dynamics for a Compliant Quadruped Robot

Pouya, S., Eckert, P., Spröwitz, A., Moc̈kel, R., Ijspeert, A. J.

In Biomimetic and Biohybrid Systems, 8064, pages: 434-437, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer, Heidelberg, 2013 (incollection)

Abstract
One of the major deficiencies of current robots in comparison to living beings is the ability to adapt to new conditions either resulting from environmental changes or their own dynamics. In this work we focus on situations where the robot experiences involuntary changes in its body particularly in its limbs’ inertia. Inspired from its biological counterparts we are interested in enabling the robot to adapt its motor control to the new system dynamics. To reach this goal, we propose two different control strategies and compare their performance when handling these modifications. Our results show substantial improvements in adaptivity to body changes when the robot is aware of its new dynamics and can exploit this knowledge in synthesising new motor control.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Towards Dynamic Trot Gait Locomotion: Design, Control, and Experiments with Cheetah-cub, a Compliant Quadruped Robot
Towards Dynamic Trot Gait Locomotion: Design, Control, and Experiments with Cheetah-cub, a Compliant Quadruped Robot

Spröwitz, A., Tuleu, A., Vespignani, M., Ajallooeian, M., Badri, E., Ijspeert, A. J.

{The International Journal of Robotics Research}, 32(8):932-950, Sage Publications, Inc., Cambridge, MA, 2013 (article)

Abstract
We present the design of a novel compliant quadruped robot, called Cheetah-cub, and a series of locomotion experiments with fast trotting gaits. The robot’s leg configuration is based on a spring-loaded, pantograph mechanism with multiple segments. A dedicated open-loop locomotion controller was derived and implemented. Experiments were run in simulation and in hardware on flat terrain and with a step down, demonstrating the robot’s self-stabilizing properties. The robot reached a running trot with short flight phases with a maximum Froude number of FR = 1.30, or 6.9 body lengths per second. Morphological parameters such as the leg design also played a role. By adding distal in-series elasticity, self- stability and maximum robot speed improved. Our robot has several advantages, especially when compared with larger and stiffer quadruped robot designs. (1) It is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the fastest of all quadruped robots below 30 kg (in terms of Froude number and body lengths per second). (2) It shows self-stabilizing behavior over a large range of speeds with open-loop control. (3) It is lightweight, compact, and electrically powered. (4) It is cheap, easy to reproduce, robust, and safe to handle. This makes it an excellent tool for research of multi-segment legs in quadruped robots.

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Youtube1 Youtube2 Youtube3 Youtube4 Youtube5 DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Youtube1 Youtube2 Youtube3 Youtube4 Youtube5 DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Expectation and Attention in Hierarchical Auditory Prediction

Chennu, S., Noreika, V., Gueorguiev, D., Blenkmann, A., Kochen, S., Ibáñez, A., Owen, A. M., Bekinschtein, T. A.

Journal of Neuroscience, 33(27):11194-11205, Society for Neuroscience, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Hierarchical predictive coding suggests that attention in humans emerges from increased precision in probabilistic inference, whereas expectation biases attention in favor of contextually anticipated stimuli. We test these notions within auditory perception by independently manipulating top-down expectation and attentional precision alongside bottom-up stimulus predictability. Our findings support an integrative interpretation of commonly observed electrophysiological signatures of neurodynamics, namely mismatch negativity (MMN), P300, and contingent negative variation (CNV), as manifestations along successive levels of predictive complexity. Early first-level processing indexed by the MMN was sensitive to stimulus predictability: here, attentional precision enhanced early responses, but explicit top-down expectation diminished it. This pattern was in contrast to later, second-level processing indexed by the P300: although sensitive to the degree of predictability, responses at this level were contingent on attentional engagement and in fact sharpened by top-down expectation. At the highest level, the drift of the CNV was a fine-grained marker of top-down expectation itself. Source reconstruction of high-density EEG, supported by intracranial recordings, implicated temporal and frontal regions differentially active at early and late levels. The cortical generators of the CNV suggested that it might be involved in facilitating the consolidation of context-salient stimuli into conscious perception. These results provide convergent empirical support to promising recent accounts of attention and expectation in predictive coding.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Horse-Like Walking, Trotting, and Galloping derived from Kinematic Motion Primitives (kMPs) and their Application to Walk/Trot Transitions in a Compliant Quadruped Robot
Horse-Like Walking, Trotting, and Galloping derived from Kinematic Motion Primitives (kMPs) and their Application to Walk/Trot Transitions in a Compliant Quadruped Robot

Moro, F., Spröwitz, A., Tuleu, A., Vespignani, M., Tsagakiris, N. G., Ijspeert, A. J., Caldwell, D. G.

Biological Cybernetics, 107(3):309-320, 2013 (article)

Abstract
This manuscript proposes a method to directly transfer the features of horse walking, trotting, and galloping to a quadruped robot, with the aim of creating a much more natural (horse-like) locomotion profile. A principal component analysis on horse joint trajectories shows that walk, trot, and gallop can be described by a set of four kinematic Motion Primitives (kMPs). These kMPs are used to generate valid, stable gaits that are tested on a compliant quadruped robot. Tests on the effects of gait frequency scaling as follows: results indicate a speed optimal walking frequency around 3.4 Hz, and an optimal trotting frequency around 4 Hz. Following, a criterion to synthesize gait transitions is proposed, and the walk/trot transitions are successfully tested on the robot. The performance of the robot when the transitions are scaled in frequency is evaluated by means of roll and pitch angle phase plots.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2012


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Evaluation of Tactile Feedback Methods for Wrist Rotation Guidance

Stanley, A. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 5(3):240-251, July 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

2012


[BibTex]


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Creating realistic virtual textures from contact acceleration data

Romano, J. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 5(2):109-119, April 2012, Cover article (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Construct Validity of Instrument Vibrations as a Measure of Robotic Surgical Skill

Gomez, E. D., Bark, K., Rivera, C., McMahan, W., Remington, A., Lee, D. I., Williams, N., Murayama, K., Dumon, K., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 215(3):S119-120, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2012, Oral presentation given by Gomez at the {\em American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress} (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2005


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Contact Location Display for Haptic Perception of Curvature and Object Motion

Provancher, W. R., Cutkosky, M. R., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Niemeyer, G.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 24(9):691-702, sep 2005 (article)

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[BibTex]

2005


[BibTex]