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2018


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Nonlinear decoding of a complex movie from the mammalian retina

Botella-Soler, V., Deny, S., Martius, G., Marre, O., Tkačik, G.

PLOS Computational Biology, 14(5):1-27, Public Library of Science, May 2018 (article)

Abstract
Author summary Neurons in the retina transform patterns of incoming light into sequences of neural spikes. We recorded from ∼100 neurons in the rat retina while it was stimulated with a complex movie. Using machine learning regression methods, we fit decoders to reconstruct the movie shown from the retinal output. We demonstrated that retinal code can only be read out with a low error if decoders make use of correlations between successive spikes emitted by individual neurons. These correlations can be used to ignore spontaneous spiking that would, otherwise, cause even the best linear decoders to “hallucinate” nonexistent stimuli. This work represents the first high resolution single-trial full movie reconstruction and suggests a new paradigm for separating spontaneous from stimulus-driven neural activity.

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DOI [BibTex]

2018


DOI [BibTex]


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Schema-related cognitive load influences performance, speech, and physiology in a dual-task setting: A continuous multi-measure approach

Wirzberger, M., Herms, R., Esmaeili Bijarsari, S., Eibl, M., Rey, G. D.

Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 3:46, Springer Nature, 2018 (article)

Abstract
Schema acquisition processes comprise an essential source of cognitive demands in learning situations. To shed light on related mechanisms and influencing factors, this study applied a continuous multi-measure approach for cognitive load assessment. In a dual-task setting, a sample of 123 student participants learned visually presented symbol combinations with one of two levels of complexity while memorizing auditorily presented number sequences. Learners’ cognitive load during the learning task was addressed by secondary task performance, prosodic speech parameters (pauses, articulation rate), and physiological markers (heart rate, skin conductance response). While results revealed increasing primary and secondary task performance over the trials, decreases in speech and physiological parameters indicated a reduction in the overall level of cognitive load with task progression. In addition, the robustness of the acquired schemata was confirmed by a transfer task that required participants to apply the obtained symbol combinations. Taken together, the observed pattern of evidence supports the idea of a logarithmically decreasing progression of cognitive load with increasing schema acquisition, and further hints on robust and stable transfer performance, even under enhanced transfer demands. Finally, theoretical and practical consequences consider evidence on desirable difficulties in learning as well as the potential of multimodal cognitive load detection in learning applications.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Attention please! Enhanced attention control abilities compensate for instructional impairments in multimedia learning

Wirzberger, M., Rey, G. D.

Journal of Computers in Education, 5(2):243-257, Springer Nature, 2018 (article)

Abstract
Learners exposed to multimedia learning contexts have to deal with a variety of visual stimuli, demanding a conducive design of learning material to maintain limitations in attentional resources. Within the current study, effects and constraints arising from two selected impairing features are investigated in more detail within a computer-based learning task on factor analysis. A sample of 53 students received a combination of textual and pictorial elements that explained the topic, while impaired attention was systematically induced in a 2 × 2 factorial between-subjects design by interrupting system-notifications (with vs. without) and seductive text passages (with vs. without). Learners’ ability for controlled attention was assessed with a standardized psychological attention inventory. Approaching the results, learners receiving seductive text passages spent significantly more time on the learning material. In addition, a moderation effect of attention control abilities on the relationship between interruptions and retention performance resulted. Explanations for the obtained findings are discussed referring to mechanisms of compensation, load, and activation.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The Computational Challenges of Pursuing Multiple Goals: Network Structure of Goal Systems Predicts Human Performance

Reichman, D., Lieder, F., Bourgin, D. D., Talmon, N., Griffiths, T. L.

PsyArXiv, 2018 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The moderating role of arousal on the seductive detail effect in a multimedia learning setting

Schneider, S., Wirzberger, M., Rey, G. D.

Applied Cognitive Psychology, Wiley, 2018 (article)

Abstract
Arousal has been found to increase learners' attentional resources. In contrast, seductive details (interesting but learning‐irrelevant information) are considered to distract attention away from relevant information and, thus, hinder learning. However, a possibly moderating role of arousal on the seductive detail effect has not been examined yet. In this study, arousal variations were induced via audio files of false heartbeats. In consequence, 100 participants were randomly assigned to a 2 (with or without seductive details) × 2 (lower vs. higher false heart rates) between‐subjects design. Data on learning performance, cognitive load, motivation, heartbeat frequency, and electro‐dermal activity were collected. Results show learning‐inhibiting effects for seductive details and learning‐enhancing effects for higher false heart rates. Cognitive processes mediate both effects. However, the detrimental effect of seductive details was not present when heart rate was higher. Results indicate that the seductive detail effect is moderated by a learner's state of arousal.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Rational metareasoning and the plasticity of cognitive control

Lieder, F., Shenhav, A., Musslick, S., Griffiths, T. L.

{PLoS Computational Biology}, 14(4):e1006043, Public Library of Science, 2018 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Over-representation of extreme events in decision making reflects rational use of cognitive resources

Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L., Hsu, M.

Psychological Review, 125(1):1-32, 2018 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2016


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Sustainable effects of simulator-based training on ecological driving

Lüderitz, C., Wirzberger, M., Karrer-Gauß, K.

In Advances in Ergonomic Design of Systems, Products and Processes. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the GfA 2015, pages: 463-475, Springer, 2016 (inbook)

Abstract
Simulation-based driver training offers a promising way to teach ecological driving behavior under controlled, comparable conditions. In a study with 23 professional drivers, we tested the effectiveness of such training. The driving behavior of a training group in a simulated drive with and without instructions were compared. Ten weeks later, a repetition drive tested the long-term effect training. Driving data revealed reduced fuel consumption by ecological driving in both the guided and repetition drives. Driving time decreased significantly in the training and did not differ from driving time after 10 weeks. Results did not achieve significance for transfer to test drives in real traffic situations. This may be due to the small sample size and biased data as a result of unusual driving behavior. Finally, recent and promising approaches to support drivers in maintaining eco-driving styles beyond training situations are outlined.

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DOI [BibTex]

2016


DOI [BibTex]


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One for all?! Simultaneous examination of load-inducing factors for advancing media-related instructional research

Wirzberger, M., Beege, M., Schneider, S., Nebel, S., Rey, G. D.

Computers {\&} Education, 100, pages: 18-31, Elsevier BV, 2016 (article)

Abstract
In multimedia learning settings, limitations in learners' mental resource capacities need to be considered to avoid impairing effects on learning performance. Based on the prominent and often quoted Cognitive Load Theory, this study investigates the potential of a single experimental approach to provide simultaneous and separate measures for the postulated load-inducing factors. Applying a basal letter-learning task related to the process of working memory updating, intrinsic cognitive load (by varying task complexity), extraneous cognitive load (via inducing split-attention demands) and germane cognitive load (by varying the presence of schemata) were manipulated within a 3 × 2 × 2-factorial full repeated-measures design. The performance of a student sample (N = 96) was inspected regarding reaction times and errors in updating and recall steps. Approaching the results with linear mixed models, the effect of complexity gained substantial strength, whereas the other factors received at least partial significant support. Additionally, interactions between two or all load-inducing factors occurred. Despite various open questions, the study comprises a promising step for the empirical investigation of existing construction yards in cognitive load research.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2015


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Modeling interruption and resumption in a smartphone task: An ACT-R approach

Wirzberger, M., Russwinkel, N.

i-com, 14(2), Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2015 (article)

Abstract
This research aims to inspect human cognition when being interrupted while performing a smartphone task with varying levels of mental demand. Due to its benefits especially in the early stages of interface development, a cognitive modeling approach is used. It applies the cognitive architecture ACT-R to shed light on task-related cognitive processing. The inspected task setting involves a shopping scenario, manipulating interruption via product advertisements and mental demands by the respective number of people shopping is done for. Model predictions are validated through a corresponding experimental setting with 62 human participants. Comparing model and human data in a defined set of performance-related parameters displays mixed results that indicate an acceptable fit – at least in some cases. Potential explanations for the observed differences are discussed at the end.

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DOI [BibTex]

2015


DOI [BibTex]


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The optimism bias may support rational action

Lieder, F., Goel, S., Kwan, R., Griffiths, T. L.

NIPS 2015 Workshop on Bounded Optimality and Rational Metareasoning, 2015 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Rational use of cognitive resources: Levels of analysis between the computational and the algorithmic

Griffiths, T. L., Lieder, F., Goodman, N. D.

Topics in Cognitive Science, 7(2):217-229, Wiley, 2015 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Novel plasticity rule can explain the development of sensorimotor intelligence

Der, R., Martius, G.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(45):E6224-E6232, 2015 (article)

Abstract
Grounding autonomous behavior in the nervous system is a fundamental challenge for neuroscience. In particular, self-organized behavioral development provides more questions than answers. Are there special functional units for curiosity, motivation, and creativity? This paper argues that these features can be grounded in synaptic plasticity itself, without requiring any higher-level constructs. We propose differential extrinsic plasticity (DEP) as a new synaptic rule for self-learning systems and apply it to a number of complex robotic systems as a test case. Without specifying any purpose or goal, seemingly purposeful and adaptive rhythmic behavior is developed, displaying a certain level of sensorimotor intelligence. These surprising results require no system-specific modifications of the DEP rule. They rather arise from the underlying mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking, which is due to the tight brain body environment coupling. The new synaptic rule is biologically plausible and would be an interesting target for neurobiological investigation. We also argue that this neuronal mechanism may have been a catalyst in natural evolution.

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Quantifying Emergent Behavior of Autonomous Robots

Martius, G., Olbrich, E.

Entropy, 17(10):7266, 2015 (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Model-based strategy selection learning

Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L.

The 2nd Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making, 2015 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2010


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Taming the Beast: Guided Self-organization of Behavior in Autonomous Robots

Martius, G., Herrmann, J. M.

In From Animals to Animats 11, 6226, pages: 50-61, LNCS, Springer, 2010 (incollection)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2010


link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2009


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A Sensor-Based Learning Algorithm for the Self-Organization of Robot Behavior

Hesse, F., Martius, G., Der, R., Herrmann, J. M.

Algorithms, 2(1):398-409, 2009 (article)

Abstract
Ideally, sensory information forms the only source of information to a robot. We consider an algorithm for the self-organization of a controller. At short timescales the controller is merely reactive but the parameter dynamics and the acquisition of knowledge by an internal model lead to seemingly purposeful behavior on longer timescales. As a paradigmatic example, we study the simulation of an underactuated snake-like robot. By interacting with the real physical system formed by the robotic hardware and the environment, the controller achieves a sensitive and body-specific actuation of the robot.

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link (url) [BibTex]

2009


link (url) [BibTex]