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2019


Learning to Explore in Motion and Interaction Tasks
Learning to Explore in Motion and Interaction Tasks

Bogdanovic, M., Righetti, L.

Proceedings 2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pages: 2686-2692, IEEE, 2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), November 2019, ISSN: 2153-0866 (conference)

Abstract
Model free reinforcement learning suffers from the high sampling complexity inherent to robotic manipulation or locomotion tasks. Most successful approaches typically use random sampling strategies which leads to slow policy convergence. In this paper we present a novel approach for efficient exploration that leverages previously learned tasks. We exploit the fact that the same system is used across many tasks and build a generative model for exploration based on data from previously solved tasks to improve learning new tasks. The approach also enables continuous learning of improved exploration strategies as novel tasks are learned. Extensive simulations on a robot manipulator performing a variety of motion and contact interaction tasks demonstrate the capabilities of the approach. In particular, our experiments suggest that the exploration strategy can more than double learning speed, especially when rewards are sparse. Moreover, the algorithm is robust to task variations and parameter tuning, making it beneficial for complex robotic problems.

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DOI [BibTex]

2019


DOI [BibTex]


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Deep Neural Network Approach in Electrical Impedance Tomography-Based Real-Time Soft Tactile Sensor

Park, H., Lee, H., Park, K., Mo, S., Kim, J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pages: 7447-7452, Macau, China, November 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, a whole-body tactile sensing have emerged in robotics for safe human-robot interaction. A key issue in the whole-body tactile sensing is ensuring large-area manufacturability and high durability. To fulfill these requirements, a reconstruction method called electrical impedance tomography (EIT) was adopted in large-area tactile sensing. This method maps voltage measurements to conductivity distribution using only a few number of measurement electrodes. A common approach for the mapping is using a linearized model derived from the Maxwell's equation. This linearized model shows fast computation time and moderate robustness against measurement noise but reconstruction accuracy is limited. In this paper, we propose a novel nonlinear EIT algorithm through Deep Neural Network (DNN) approach to improve the reconstruction accuracy of EIT-based tactile sensors. The neural network architecture with rectified linear unit (ReLU) function ensured extremely low computational time (0.002 seconds) and nonlinear network structure which provides superior measurement accuracy. The DNN model was trained with dataset synthesized in simulation environment. To achieve the robustness against measurement noise, the training proceeded with additive Gaussian noise that estimated through actual measurement noise. For real sensor application, the trained DNN model was transferred to a conductive fabric-based soft tactile sensor. For validation, the reconstruction error and noise robustness were mainly compared using conventional linearized model and proposed approach in simulation environment. As a demonstration, the tactile sensor equipped with the trained DNN model is presented for a contact force estimation.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Robust Humanoid Locomotion Using Trajectory Optimization and Sample-Efficient Learning

Yeganegi, M. H., Khadiv, M., Moosavian, S. A. A., Zhu, J., Prete, A. D., Righetti, L.

Proceedings International Conference on Humanoid Robots, IEEE, 2019 IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, October 2019 (conference)

Abstract
Trajectory optimization (TO) is one of the most powerful tools for generating feasible motions for humanoid robots. However, including uncertainties and stochasticity in the TO problem to generate robust motions can easily lead to intractable problems. Furthermore, since the models used in TO have always some level of abstraction, it can be hard to find a realistic set of uncertainties in the model space. In this paper we leverage a sample-efficient learning technique (Bayesian optimization) to robustify TO for humanoid locomotion. The main idea is to use data from full-body simulations to make the TO stage robust by tuning the cost weights. To this end, we split the TO problem into two phases. The first phase solves a convex optimization problem for generating center of mass (CoM) trajectories based on simplified linear dynamics. The second stage employs iterative Linear-Quadratic Gaussian (iLQG) as a whole-body controller to generate full body control inputs. Then we use Bayesian optimization to find the cost weights to use in the first stage that yields robust performance in the simulation/experiment, in the presence of different disturbance/uncertainties. The results show that the proposed approach is able to generate robust motions for different sets of disturbances and uncertainties.

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https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.04616 link (url) [BibTex]

https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.04616 link (url) [BibTex]


Effect of Remote Masking on Detection of Electrovibration
Effect of Remote Masking on Detection of Electrovibration

Jamalzadeh, M., Güçlü, B., Vardar, Y., Basdogan, C.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 229-234, Tokyo, Japan, July 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Masking has been used to study human perception of tactile stimuli, including those created on haptic touch screens. Earlier studies have investigated the effect of in-site masking on tactile perception of electrovibration. In this study, we investigated whether it is possible to change detection threshold of electrovibration at fingertip of index finger via remote masking, i.e. by applying a (mechanical) vibrotactile stimulus on the proximal phalanx of the same finger. The masking stimuli were generated by a voice coil (Haptuator). For eight participants, we first measured the detection thresholds for electrovibration at the fingertip and for vibrotactile stimuli at the proximal phalanx. Then, the vibrations on the skin were measured at four different locations on the index finger of subjects to investigate how the mechanical masking stimulus propagated as the masking level was varied. Finally, electrovibration thresholds measured in the presence of vibrotactile masking stimuli. Our results show that vibrotactile masking stimuli generated sub-threshold vibrations around fingertip, and hence did not mechanically interfere with the electrovibration stimulus. However, there was a clear psychophysical masking effect due to central neural processes. Electrovibration absolute threshold increased approximately 0.19 dB for each dB increase in the masking level.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Objective and Subjective Assessment of Algorithms for Reducing Three-Axis Vibrations to One-Axis Vibrations
Objective and Subjective Assessment of Algorithms for Reducing Three-Axis Vibrations to One-Axis Vibrations

Park, G., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference, pages: 467-472, July 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A typical approach to creating realistic vibrotactile feedback is reducing 3D vibrations recorded by an accelerometer to 1D signals that can be played back on a haptic actuator, but some of the information is often lost in this dimensional reduction process. This paper describes seven representative algorithms and proposes four metrics based on the spectral match, the temporal match, and the average value and the variability of them across 3D rotations. These four performance metrics were applied to four texture recordings, and the method utilizing the discrete fourier transform (DFT) was found to be the best regardless of the sensing axis. We also recruited 16 participants to assess the perceptual similarity achieved by each algorithm in real time. We found the four metrics correlated well with the subjectively rated similarities for the six dimensional reduction algorithms, with the exception of taking the 3D vector magnitude, which was perceived to be good despite its low spectral and temporal match metrics.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Fingertip Interaction Metrics Correlate with Visual and Haptic Perception of Real Surfaces
Fingertip Interaction Metrics Correlate with Visual and Haptic Perception of Real Surfaces

Vardar, Y., Wallraven, C., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 395-400, Tokyo, Japan, July 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Both vision and touch contribute to the perception of real surfaces. Although there have been many studies on the individual contributions of each sense, it is still unclear how each modality’s information is processed and integrated. To fill this gap, we investigated the similarity of visual and haptic perceptual spaces, as well as how well they each correlate with fingertip interaction metrics. Twenty participants interacted with ten different surfaces from the Penn Haptic Texture Toolkit by either looking at or touching them and judged their similarity in pairs. By analyzing the resulting similarity ratings using multi-dimensional scaling (MDS), we found that surfaces are similarly organized within the three-dimensional perceptual spaces of both modalities. Also, between-participant correlations were significantly higher in the haptic condition. In a separate experiment, we obtained the contact forces and accelerations acting on one finger interacting with each surface in a controlled way. We analyzed the collected fingertip interaction data in both the time and frequency domains. Our results suggest that the three perceptual dimensions for each modality can be represented by roughness/smoothness, hardness/softness, and friction, and that these dimensions can be estimated by surface vibration power, tap spectral centroid, and kinetic friction coefficient, respectively.

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Haptipedia: Accelerating Haptic Device Discovery to Support Interaction & Engineering Design
Haptipedia: Accelerating Haptic Device Discovery to Support Interaction & Engineering Design

Seifi, H., Fazlollahi, F., Oppermann, M., Sastrillo, J. A., Ip, J., Agrawal, A., Park, G., Kuchenbecker, K. J., MacLean, K. E.

In Proceedings of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), Glasgow, Scotland, May 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Creating haptic experiences often entails inventing, modifying, or selecting specialized hardware. However, experience designers are rarely engineers, and 30 years of haptic inventions are buried in a fragmented literature that describes devices mechanically rather than by potential purpose. We conceived of Haptipedia to unlock this trove of examples: Haptipedia presents a device corpus for exploration through metadata that matter to both device and experience designers. It is a taxonomy of device attributes that go beyond physical description to capture potential utility, applied to a growing database of 105 grounded force-feedback devices, and accessed through a public visualization that links utility to morphology. Haptipedia's design was driven by both systematic review of the haptic device literature and rich input from diverse haptic designers. We describe Haptipedia's reception (including hopes it will redefine device reporting standards) and our plans for its sustainability through community participation.

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Internal Array Electrodes Improve the Spatial Resolution of Soft Tactile Sensors Based on Electrical Resistance Tomography

Lee, H., Park, K., Kim, J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 5411-5417, Montreal, Canada, May 2019, Hyosang Lee and Kyungseo Park contributed equally to this publication (inproceedings)

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A Clustering Approach to Categorizing 7 Degree-of-Freedom Arm Motions during Activities of Daily Living

Gloumakov, Y., Spiers, A. J., Dollar, A. M.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 7214-7220, Montreal, Canada, May 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we present a novel method of categorizing naturalistic human arm motions during activities of daily living using clustering techniques. While many current approaches attempt to define all arm motions using heuristic interpretation, or a combination of several abstract motion primitives, our unsupervised approach generates a hierarchical description of natural human motion with well recognized groups. Reliable recommendation of a subset of motions for task achievement is beneficial to various fields, such as robotic and semi-autonomous prosthetic device applications. The proposed method makes use of well-known techniques such as dynamic time warping (DTW) to obtain a divergence measure between motion segments, DTW barycenter averaging (DBA) to get a motion average, and Ward's distance criterion to build the hierarchical tree. The clusters that emerge summarize the variety of recorded motions into the following general tasks: reach-to-front, transfer-box, drinking from vessel, on-table motion, turning a key or door knob, and reach-to-back pocket. The clustering methodology is justified by comparing against an alternative measure of divergence using Bezier coefficients and K-medoids clustering.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Improving Haptic Adjective Recognition with Unsupervised Feature Learning
Improving Haptic Adjective Recognition with Unsupervised Feature Learning

Richardson, B. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 3804-3810, Montreal, Canada, May 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Humans can form an impression of how a new object feels simply by touching its surfaces with the densely innervated skin of the fingertips. Many haptics researchers have recently been working to endow robots with similar levels of haptic intelligence, but these efforts almost always employ hand-crafted features, which are brittle, and concrete tasks, such as object recognition. We applied unsupervised feature learning methods, specifically K-SVD and Spatio-Temporal Hierarchical Matching Pursuit (ST-HMP), to rich multi-modal haptic data from a diverse dataset. We then tested the learned features on 19 more abstract binary classification tasks that center on haptic adjectives such as smooth and squishy. The learned features proved superior to traditional hand-crafted features by a large margin, almost doubling the average F1 score across all adjectives. Additionally, particular exploratory procedures (EPs) and sensor channels were found to support perception of certain haptic adjectives, underlining the need for diverse interactions and multi-modal haptic data.

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Efficient Humanoid Contact Planning using Learned Centroidal Dynamics Prediction

Lin, Y., Ponton, B., Righetti, L., Berenson, D.

International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 5280-5286, IEEE, May 2019 (conference)

mg

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Leveraging Contact Forces for Learning to Grasp
Leveraging Contact Forces for Learning to Grasp

Merzic, H., Bogdanovic, M., Kappler, D., Righetti, L., Bohg, J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) 2019, IEEE, International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Grasping objects under uncertainty remains an open problem in robotics research. This uncertainty is often due to noisy or partial observations of the object pose or shape. To enable a robot to react appropriately to unforeseen effects, it is crucial that it continuously takes sensor feedback into account. While visual feedback is important for inferring a grasp pose and reaching for an object, contact feedback offers valuable information during manipulation and grasp acquisition. In this paper, we use model-free deep reinforcement learning to synthesize control policies that exploit contact sensing to generate robust grasping under uncertainty. We demonstrate our approach on a multi-fingered hand that exhibits more complex finger coordination than the commonly used two- fingered grippers. We conduct extensive experiments in order to assess the performance of the learned policies, with and without contact sensing. While it is possible to learn grasping policies without contact sensing, our results suggest that contact feedback allows for a significant improvement of grasping robustness under object pose uncertainty and for objects with a complex shape.

am mg

video arXiv [BibTex]

video arXiv [BibTex]


A Novel Texture Rendering Approach for Electrostatic Displays
A Novel Texture Rendering Approach for Electrostatic Displays

Fiedler, T., Vardar, Y.

In Proceedings of International Workshop on Haptic and Audio Interaction Design (HAID), Lille, France, March 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Generating realistic texture feelings on tactile displays using data-driven methods has attracted a lot of interest in the last decade. However, the need for large data storages and transmission rates complicates the use of these methods for the future commercial displays. In this paper, we propose a new texture rendering approach which can compress the texture data signicantly for electrostatic displays. Using three sample surfaces, we first explain how to record, analyze and compress the texture data, and render them on a touchscreen. Then, through psychophysical experiments conducted with nineteen participants, we show that the textures can be reproduced by a signicantly less number of frequency components than the ones in the original signal without inducing perceptual degradation. Moreover, our results indicate that the possible degree of compression is affected by the surface properties.

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Fiedler19-HAID-Electrostatic [BibTex]

Fiedler19-HAID-Electrostatic [BibTex]

2018


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Assessment Of Atypical Motor Development In Infants Through Toy-Stimulated Play And Center Of Pressure Analysis

Zhao, S., Mohan, M., Torres, W. O., Bogen, D. K., Shofer, F. S., Prosser, L., Loeb, H., Johnson, M. J.

In Proceedings of the Annual Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Conference, Arlington, USA, July 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
There is a need to identify measures and create systems to assess motor development at an early stage. Center of Pressure (CoP) is a quantifiable metric that has been used to investigate postural control in healthy young children [6], children with CP [7], and infants just beginning to sit [8]. It was found that infants born prematurely exhibit different patterns of CoP movement than infants born full-term when assessing development impairments relating to postural control [9]. Preterm infants exhibited greater CoP excursions but had greater variability in their movements than fullterm infants. Our solution, the Play And Neuro-Development Assessment (PANDA) Gym, is a sensorized environment that aims to provide early diagnosis of neuromotor disorder in infants and improve current screening processes by providing quantitative measures rather than subjective ones, and promoting natural play with the stimulus of toys. Previous studies have documented stages in motor development in infants [10, 11], and developmental delays could become more apparent through toy interactions. This study examines the sensitivity of the pressure-sensitive mat subsystem to detect differences in CoP movement patterns for preterm and fullterm infants less than 6 months of age, with varying risk levels. This study aims to distinguish between typical and atypical motor development through assessment of the CoP data of infants in a natural play environment, in conditions where movement may be further stimulated with the presence of a toy.

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link (url) [BibTex]

2018


link (url) [BibTex]


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Travelling Ultrasonic Wave Enhances Keyclick Sensation

Gueorguiev, D., Kaci, A., Amberg, M., Giraud, F., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In Haptics: Science, Technology, and Applications, pages: 302-312, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A realistic keyclick sensation is a serious challenge for haptic feedback since vibrotactile rendering faces the limitation of the absence of contact force as experienced on physical buttons. It has been shown that creating a keyclick sensation is possible with stepwise ultrasonic friction modulation. However, the intensity of the sensation is limited by the impedance of the fingertip and by the absence of a lateral force component external to the finger. In our study, we compare this technique to rendering with an ultrasonic travelling wave, which exerts a lateral force on the fingertip. For both techniques, participants were asked to report the detection (or not) of a keyclick during a forced choice one interval procedure. In experiment 1, participants could press the surface as many time as they wanted for a given trial. In experiment 2, they were constrained to press only once. The results show a lower perceptual threshold for travelling waves. Moreover, participants pressed less times per trial and exerted smaller normal force on the surface. The subjective quality of the sensation was found similar for both techniques. In general, haptic feedback based on travelling ultrasonic waves is promising for applications without lateral motion of the finger.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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On Time Optimization of Centroidal Momentum Dynamics

Ponton, B., Herzog, A., Del Prete, A., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In 2018 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 5776-5782, IEEE, Brisbane, Australia, 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, the centroidal momentum dynamics has received substantial attention to plan dynamically consistent motions for robots with arms and legs in multi-contact scenarios. However, it is also non convex which renders any optimization approach difficult and timing is usually kept fixed in most trajectory optimization techniques to not introduce additional non convexities to the problem. But this can limit the versatility of the algorithms. In our previous work, we proposed a convex relaxation of the problem that allowed to efficiently compute momentum trajectories and contact forces. However, our approach could not minimize a desired angular momentum objective which seriously limited its applicability. Noticing that the non-convexity introduced by the time variables is of similar nature as the centroidal dynamics one, we propose two convex relaxations to the problem based on trust regions and soft constraints. The resulting approaches can compute time-optimized dynamically consistent trajectories sufficiently fast to make the approach realtime capable. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated in several multi-contact scenarios for a humanoid robot. In particular, we show that the proposed convex relaxation of the original problem finds solutions that are consistent with the original non-convex problem and illustrate how timing optimization allows to find motion plans that would be difficult to plan with fixed timing † †Implementation details and demos can be found in the source code available at https://git-amd.tuebingen.mpg.de/bponton/timeoptimization.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Exploring Fingers’ Limitation of Texture Density Perception on Ultrasonic Haptic Displays

Kalantari, F., Gueorguiev, D., Lank, E., Bremard, N., Grisoni, L.

In Haptics: Science, Technology, and Applications, pages: 354-365, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recent research in haptic feedback is motivated by the crucial role that tactile perception plays in everyday touch interactions. In this paper, we describe psychophysical experiments to investigate the perceptual threshold of individual fingers on both the right and left hand of right-handed participants using active dynamic touch for spatial period discrimination of both sinusoidal and square-wave gratings on ultrasonic haptic touchscreens. Both one-finger and multi-finger touch were studied and compared. Our results indicate that users' finger identity (index finger, middle finger, etc.) significantly affect the perception of both gratings in the case of one-finger exploration. We show that index finger and thumb are the most sensitive in all conditions whereas little finger followed by ring are the least sensitive for haptic perception. For multi-finger exploration, the right hand was found to be more sensitive than the left hand for both gratings. Our findings also demonstrate similar perception sensitivity between multi-finger exploration and the index finger of users' right hands (i.e. dominant hand in our study), while significant difference was found between single and multi-finger perception sensitivity for the left hand.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Direct observations of sub-100 nm spin wave propagation in magnonic wave-guides

Träger, N., Gruszecki, P., Lisiecki, F., Förster, J., Weigand, M., Kuswik, P., Dubowik, J., Schütz, G., Krawczyk, M., Gräfe, J.

In 2018 IEEE International Magnetics Conference (INTERMAG 2018), IEEE, Singapore, 2018 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Contact Learning for Humanoid Estimation and Control

Rotella, N., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In 2018 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 411-417, IEEE, Brisbane, Australia, 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This work presents a method for contact state estimation using fuzzy clustering to learn contact probability for full, six-dimensional humanoid contacts. The data required for training is solely from proprioceptive sensors - endeffector contact wrench sensors and inertial measurement units (IMUs) - and the method is completely unsupervised. The resulting cluster means are used to efficiently compute the probability of contact in each of the six endeffector degrees of freedom (DoFs) independently. This clustering-based contact probability estimator is validated in a kinematics-based base state estimator in a simulation environment with realistic added sensor noise for locomotion over rough, low-friction terrain on which the robot is subject to foot slip and rotation. The proposed base state estimator which utilizes these six DoF contact probability estimates is shown to perform considerably better than that which determines kinematic contact constraints purely based on measured normal force.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Learning Task-Specific Dynamics to Improve Whole-Body Control

Gams, A., Mason, S., Ude, A., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In Hua, IEEE, Beijing, China, November 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In task-based inverse dynamics control, reference accelerations used to follow a desired plan can be broken down into feedforward and feedback trajectories. The feedback term accounts for tracking errors that are caused from inaccurate dynamic models or external disturbances. On underactuated, free-floating robots, such as humanoids, high feedback terms can be used to improve tracking accuracy; however, this can lead to very stiff behavior or poor tracking accuracy due to limited control bandwidth. In this paper, we show how to reduce the required contribution of the feedback controller by incorporating learned task-space reference accelerations. Thus, we i) improve the execution of the given specific task, and ii) offer the means to reduce feedback gains, providing for greater compliance of the system. With a systematic approach we also reduce heuristic tuning of the model parameters and feedback gains, often present in real-world experiments. In contrast to learning task-specific joint-torques, which might produce a similar effect but can lead to poor generalization, our approach directly learns the task-space dynamics of the center of mass of a humanoid robot. Simulated and real-world results on the lower part of the Sarcos Hermes humanoid robot demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

am mg

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Interpreting FORC diagrams beyond the Preisach model: an experimental permalloy micro array investigation

Gross, F., Ilse, S., Schütz, G., Gräfe, J., Goering, E.

In 2018 IEEE International Magnetics Conference (INTERMAG 2018), IEEE, Singapore, 2018 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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An MPC Walking Framework With External Contact Forces

Mason, S., Rotella, N., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In 2018 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 1785-1790, IEEE, Brisbane, Australia, May 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this work, we present an extension to a linear Model Predictive Control (MPC) scheme that plans external contact forces for the robot when given multiple contact locations and their corresponding friction cone. To this end, we set up a two-step optimization problem. In the first optimization, we compute the Center of Mass (CoM) trajectory, foot step locations, and introduce slack variables to account for violating the imposed constraints on the Zero Moment Point (ZMP). We then use the slack variables to trigger the second optimization, in which we calculate the optimal external force that compensates for the ZMP tracking error. This optimization considers multiple contacts positions within the environment by formulating the problem as a Mixed Integer Quadratic Program (MIQP) that can be solved at a speed between 100-300 Hz. Once contact is created, the MIQP reduces to a single Quadratic Program (QP) that can be solved in real-time ({\textless}; 1kHz). Simulations show that the presented walking control scheme can withstand disturbances 2-3× larger with the additional force provided by a hand contact.

am mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2017


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Synchronicity Trumps Mischief in Rhythmic Human-Robot Social-Physical Interaction

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the International Symposium on Robotics Research (ISRR), Puerto Varas, Chile, December 2017 (inproceedings) In press

Abstract
Hand-clapping games and other forms of rhythmic social-physical interaction might help foster human-robot teamwork, but the design of such interactions has scarcely been explored. We leveraged our prior work to enable the Rethink Robotics Baxter Research Robot to competently play one-handed tempo-matching hand-clapping games with a human user. To understand how such a robot’s capabilities and behaviors affect user perception, we created four versions of this interaction: the hand clapping could be initiated by either the robot or the human, and the non-initiating partner could be either cooperative, yielding synchronous motion, or mischievously uncooperative. Twenty adults tested two clapping tempos in each of these four interaction modes in a random order, rating every trial on standardized scales. The study results showed that having the robot initiate the interaction gave it a more dominant perceived personality. Despite previous results on the intrigue of misbehaving robots, we found that moving synchronously with the robot almost always made the interaction more enjoyable, less mentally taxing, less physically demanding, and lower effort for users than asynchronous interactions caused by robot or human mischief. Taken together, our results indicate that cooperative rhythmic social-physical interaction has the potential to strengthen human-robot partnerships.

hi

[BibTex]

2017


[BibTex]


A Robotic Framework to Overcome Sensory Overload in Children on the Autism Spectrum: A Pilot Study
A Robotic Framework to Overcome Sensory Overload in Children on the Autism Spectrum: A Pilot Study

Javed, H., Burns, R., Jeon, M., Howard, A., Park, C. H.

In International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) 2017, International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, September 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper discusses a novel framework designed to provide sensory stimulation to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The set up consists of multi-sensory stations to stimulate visual/auditory/olfactory/gustatory/tactile/vestibular senses, together with a robotic agent that navigates through each station responding to the different stimuli. We hypothesize that the robot’s responses will help children learn acceptable ways to respond to stimuli that might otherwise trigger sensory overload. Preliminary results from a pilot study conducted to examine the effectiveness of such a setup were encouraging and are described briefly in this text.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


An Interactive Robotic System for Promoting Social Engagement
An Interactive Robotic System for Promoting Social Engagement

Burns, R., Javed, H., Jeon, M., Howard, A., Park, C. H.

In International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) 2017, International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, September 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This abstract (and poster) is a condensed version of Burns' Master's thesis and related journal article. It discusses the use of imitation via robotic motion learning to improve human-robot interaction. It focuses on the preliminary results from a pilot study of 12 subjects. We hypothesized that the robot's use of imitation will increase the user's openness towards engaging with the robot. Post-imitation, experimental subjects displayed a more positive emotional state, had higher instances of mood contagion towards the robot, and interpreted the robot to have a higher level of autonomy than their control group counterparts. These results point to an increased user interest in engagement fueled by personalized imitation during interaction.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Stiffness Perception during Pinching and Dissection with Teleoperated Haptic Forceps

Ng, C., Zareinia, K., Sun, Q., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), pages: 456-463, Lisbon, Portugal, August 2017 (inproceedings)

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Towards quantifying dynamic human-human physical interactions for robot assisted stroke therapy

Mohan, M., Mendonca, R., Johnson, M. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), London, UK, July 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Human-Robot Interaction is a prominent field of robotics today. Knowledge of human-human physical interaction can prove vital in creating dynamic physical interactions between human and robots. Most of the current work in studying this interaction has been from a haptic perspective. Through this paper, we present metrics that can be used to identify if a physical interaction occurred between two people using kinematics. We present a simple Activity of Daily Living (ADL) task which involves a simple interaction. We show that we can use these metrics to successfully identify interactions.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Design of a Parallel Continuum Manipulator for 6-DOF Fingertip Haptic Display

Young, E. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 599-604, Munich, Germany, June 2017, Finalist for best poster paper (inproceedings)

Abstract
Despite rapid advancements in the field of fingertip haptics, rendering tactile cues with six degrees of freedom (6 DOF) remains an elusive challenge. In this paper, we investigate the potential of displaying fingertip haptic sensations with a 6-DOF parallel continuum manipulator (PCM) that mounts to the user's index finger and moves a contact platform around the fingertip. Compared to traditional mechanisms composed of rigid links and discrete joints, PCMs have the potential to be strong, dexterous, and compact, but they are also more complicated to design. We define the design space of 6-DOF parallel continuum manipulators and outline a process for refining such a device for fingertip haptic applications. Following extensive simulation, we obtain 12 designs that meet our specifications, construct a manually actuated prototype of one such design, and evaluate the simulation's ability to accurately predict the prototype's motion. Finally, we demonstrate the range of deliverable fingertip tactile cues, including a normal force into the finger and shear forces tangent to the finger at three extreme points on the boundary of the fingertip.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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High Magnitude Unidirectional Haptic Force Display Using a Motor/Brake Pair and a Cable

Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 394-399, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Clever electromechanical design is required to make the force feedback delivered by a kinesthetic haptic interface both strong and safe. This paper explores a onedimensional haptic force display that combines a DC motor and a magnetic particle brake on the same shaft. Rather than a rigid linkage, a spooled cable connects the user to the actuators to enable a large workspace, reduce the moving mass, and eliminate the sticky residual force from the brake. This design combines the high torque/power ratio of the brake and the active output capabilities of the motor to provide a wider range of forces than can be achieved with either actuator alone. A prototype of this device was built, its performance was characterized, and it was used to simulate constant force sources and virtual springs and dampers. Compared to the conventional design of using only a motor, the hybrid device can output higher unidirectional forces at the expense of free space feeling less free.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A Stimulus-Response Model Of Therapist-Patient Interactions In Task-Oriented Stroke Therapy Can Guide Robot-Patient Interactions

Johnson, M., Mohan, M., Mendonca, R.

In Proceedings of the Annual Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Conference, New Orleans, USA, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Current robot-patient interactions do not accurately model therapist-patient interactions in task-oriented stroke therapy. We analyzed patient-therapist interactions in task-oriented stroke therapy captured in 8 videos. We developed a model of the interaction between a patient and a therapist that can be overlaid on a stimulus-response paradigm where the therapist and the patient take on a set of acting states or roles and are motivated to move from one role to another when certain physical or verbal stimuli or cues are sensed and received. We examined how the model varies across 8 activities of daily living tasks and map this to a possible model for robot-patient interaction.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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A Wrist-Squeezing Force-Feedback System for Robotic Surgery Training

Brown, J. D., Fernandez, J. N., Cohen, S. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 107-112, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Over time, surgical trainees learn to compensate for the lack of haptic feedback in commercial robotic minimally invasive surgical systems. Incorporating touch cues into robotic surgery training could potentially shorten this learning process if the benefits of haptic feedback were sustained after it is removed. In this paper, we develop a wrist-squeezing haptic feedback system and evaluate whether it holds the potential to train novice da Vinci users to reduce the force they exert on a bimanual inanimate training task. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups according to a multiple baseline experimental design. Each of the ten participants moved a ring along a curved wire nine times while the haptic feedback was conditionally withheld, provided, and withheld again. The realtime tactile feedback of applied force magnitude significantly reduced the integral of the force produced by the da Vinci tools on the task materials, and this result remained even when the haptic feedback was removed. Overall, our findings suggest that wrist-squeezing force feedback can play an essential role in helping novice trainees learn to minimize the force they exert with a surgical robot.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Handling Scan-Time Parameters in Haptic Surface Classification

Burka, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 424-429, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Proton 2: Increasing the Sensitivity and Portability of a Visuo-haptic Surface Interaction Recorder

Burka, A., Rajvanshi, A., Allen, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 439-445, Singapore, May 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Portable Robotic Optical/Tactile ObservatioN PACKage (PROTONPACK, or Proton for short) is a new handheld visuo-haptic sensing system that records surface interactions. We previously demonstrated system calibration and a classification task using external motion tracking. This paper details improvements in surface classification performance and removal of the dependence on external motion tracking, necessary before embarking on our goal of gathering a vast surface interaction dataset. Two experiments were performed to refine data collection parameters. After adjusting the placement and filtering of the Proton's high-bandwidth accelerometers, we recorded interactions between two differently-sized steel tooling ball end-effectors (diameter 6.35 and 9.525 mm) and five surfaces. Using features based on normal force, tangential force, end-effector speed, and contact vibration, we trained multi-class SVMs to classify the surfaces using 50 ms chunks of data from each end-effector. Classification accuracies of 84.5% and 91.5% respectively were achieved on unseen test data, an improvement over prior results. In parallel, we pursued on-board motion tracking, using the Proton's camera and fiducial markers. Motion tracks from the external and onboard trackers agree within 2 mm and 0.01 rad RMS, and the accuracy decreases only slightly to 87.7% when using onboard tracking for the 9.525 mm end-effector. These experiments indicate that the Proton 2 is ready for portable data collection.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Robot Therapist for Assisting in At-Home Rehabilitation of Shoulder Surgery Patients
Robot Therapist for Assisting in At-Home Rehabilitation of Shoulder Surgery Patients

(Recipient of Innovation & Entrepreneurship Prize)

Burns, R., Alborz, M., Chalup, Z., Downen, S., Genuino, K., Nayback, C., Nesbitt, N., Park, C. H.

In 2017 GW Research Days, Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations, April 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The number of middle-aged to elderly patients receiving shoulder surgery is increasing. However, statistically, very few of these patients perform the necessary at-home physical therapy regimen they are prescribed post-surgery. This results in longer recovery times and/or incomplete healing. We propose the use of a robotic therapist, with customized training and encouragement regimens, to increase physical therapy adherence and improve the patient’s recovery experience.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Motion Learning for Emotional Interaction and Imitation of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Motion Learning for Emotional Interaction and Imitation of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

(First place tie in category, "Biomedical Engineering, Graduate Research")

Burns, R., Cowin, S.

In 2017 GW Research Days, Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations, April 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We aim to use motion learning to teach a robot to imitate people's unique gestures. Our robot, ROBOTIS-OP2, can ultimately use imitation to practice social skills with children with autism. In this abstract, two methods of motion learning were compared: Dynamic motion primitives with least squares (DMP with WLS), and Dynamic motion primitives with a Gaussian Mixture Regression (DMP with GMR). Movements with sharp turns were most accurately reproduced using DMP with GMR. Additionally, more states are required to accurately recreate more complex gestures.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Roughness perception of virtual textures displayed by electrovibration on touch screens
Roughness perception of virtual textures displayed by electrovibration on touch screens

Vardar, Y., Isleyen, A., Saleem, M. K., Basdogan, C.

In 2017 IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 263-268, 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this study, we have investigated the human roughness perception of periodical textures on an electrostatic display by conducting psychophysical experiments with 10 subjects. To generate virtual textures, we used low frequency unipolar pulse waves in different waveform (sinusoidal, square, saw-tooth, triangle), and spacing. We modulated these waves with a 3kHz high frequency sinusoidal carrier signal to minimize perceptional differences due to the electrical filtering of human finger and eliminate low-frequency distortions. The subjects were asked to rate 40 different macro textures on a Likert scale of 1-7. We also collected the normal and tangential forces acting on the fingers of subjects during the experiment. The results of our user study showed that subjects perceived the square wave as the roughest while they perceived the other waveforms equally rough. The perceived roughness followed an inverted U-shaped curve as a function of groove width, but the peak point shifted to the left compared to the results of the earlier studies. Moreover, we found that the roughness perception of subjects is best correlated with the rate of change of the contact forces rather than themselves.

hi

vardar_whc2017 DOI [BibTex]

vardar_whc2017 DOI [BibTex]


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Feeling multiple edges: The tactile perception of short ultrasonic square reductions of the finger-surface friction

Gueorguiev, D., Vezzoli, E., Sednaoui, T., Grisoni, L., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In 2017 IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 125-129, 2017 (inproceedings)

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Pattern Generation for Walking on Slippery Terrains

Khadiv, M., Moosavian, S. A. A., Herzog, A., Righetti, L.

In 2017 5th International Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ICROM), Iran, August 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we extend state of the art Model Predictive Control (MPC) approaches to generate safe bipedal walking on slippery surfaces. In this setting, we formulate walking as a trade off between realizing a desired walking velocity and preserving robust foot-ground contact. Exploiting this for- mulation inside MPC, we show that safe walking on various flat terrains can be achieved by compromising three main attributes, i. e. walking velocity tracking, the Zero Moment Point (ZMP) modulation, and the Required Coefficient of Friction (RCoF) regulation. Simulation results show that increasing the walking velocity increases the possibility of slippage, while reducing the slippage possibility conflicts with reducing the tip-over possibility of the contact and vice versa.

mg

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

2015


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Assessing human-human therapy kinematics for retargeting to human-robot therapy

Johnson, M. J., Christopher, S. M., Mohan, M., Mendonca, R.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), Singapore, August 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we present experiments examining the accuracy of data collected from a Kinect sensor for capturing close interactive actions of a therapist with a patient during stroke rehabilitation. Our long-term goal is to map human-human interactions such as these patient-therapist ones onto human-robot interactions. In many robot interaction scenarios, the robot does not mimic interaction between two or more humans, which is a major part of stroke therapy. The Kinect works for functional tasks such as a reaching task where the interaction to be retargeted by the robot is minimal to none; though this data is not good for a functional task involving touching another person. We demonstrate that the noisy data from Kinect does not produce a system robust enough to be for remapping to a humanoid robot a therapit's movements when in contact with a person.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

2015


DOI [BibTex]


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Toward a large-scale visuo-haptic dataset for robotic learning

Burka, A., Hu, S., Krishnan, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Hendricks, L. A., Gao, Y., Darrell, T.

In Proc. CVPR Workshop on the Future of Datasets in Vision, 2015 (inproceedings)

hi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Detecting Lumps in Simulated Tissue via Palpation with a BioTac

Hui, J., Block, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Hui (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Analysis of the Instrument Vibrations and Contact Forces Caused by an Expert Robotic Surgeon Doing FRS Tasks

Brown, J. D., O’Brien, C., Miyasaka, K., Dumon, K. R., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics, pages: 75-76, London, England, June 2015, Poster presentation given by Brown (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Should Haptic Texture Vibrations Respond to User Force and Speed?

Culbertson, H., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In IEEE World Haptics Conference, pages: 106 - 112, Evanston, Illinois, USA, June 2015, Oral presentation given by Culbertson (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enabling the Baxter Robot to Play Hand-Clapping Games

Fitter, N. T., Neuburger, M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, June 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Using IMU Data to Teach a Robot Hand-Clapping Games

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 353-355, April 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Haptic Feedback in Transoral Robotic Surgery: A Feasibility Study

Bur, A. M., Gomez, E. D., Rassekh, C. H., Newman, J. G., Weinstein, G. S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Annual Meeting of the Triological Society at COSM, April 2015, Poster presentation given by Bur (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Human Machine Interface for Dexto Eka: - The humanoid robot

Kumra, S., Mohan, M., Gupta, S., Vaswani, H.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics, Automation, Control and Embedded Systems (RACE), Chennai, India, Febuary 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper illustrates hybrid control system of the humanoid robot, Dexto:Eka: focusing on the dependent or slave mode. Efficiency of any system depends on the fluid operation of its control system. Here, we elucidate the control of 12 DoF robotic arms and an omnidirectional mecanum wheel drive using an exo-frame, and a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a control column. This paper comprises of algorithms, control mechanisms and overall flow of execution for the regulation of robotic arms, graphical user interface and locomotion.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Conception and development of Dexto:Eka: The Humanoid Robot - Part IV

Kumra, S., Mohan, M., Vaswani, H., Gupta, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics, Automation, Control and Embedded Systems (RACE), Febuary 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper elucidates the fourth phase of the development of `Dexto:Eka: - The Humanoid Robot'. It lays special emphasis on the conception of the locomotion drive and the development of vision based system that aids navigation and tele-operation. The first three phases terminated with the completion of two robotic arms with six degrees of freedom each, structural development and the creation of a human machine interface that included an exo-frame, a control column and a graphical user interface. This phase also involved the enhancement of the exo-frame to a vision based system using a Kinect camera. The paper also focuses on the reasons behind choosing the locomotion drive and the benefits it has.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Design and Validation of a Practical Simulator for Transoral Robotic Surgery

Bur, A. M., Gomez, E. D., Chalian, A. A., Newman, J. G., Weinstein, G. S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Society for Robotic Surgery Annual Meeting: Transoral Program, (T8), February 2015, Oral presentation given by Bur (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Combined FORC and x-ray microscopy study of magnetisation reversal in antidot lattices

Gräfe, J., Haering, F., Stahl, C., Weigand, M., Skripnik, M., Nowak, U., Ziemann, P., Wiedwald, U., Schütz, G., Goering, E.

In IEEE International Magnetics Conference (INTERMAG 2015), IEEE, Beijing, China, 2015 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]