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Wenn es was zu sagen gibt

(Klaus Tschira Award 2014 in Computer Science)

Trimpe, S.

Bild der Wissenschaft, pages: 20-23, November 2014, (popular science article in German) (article)

am ics

PDF Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Project Page [BibTex]


Nanopropellers and Their Actuation in Complex Viscoelastic Media
Nanopropellers and Their Actuation in Complex Viscoelastic Media

Schamel, D., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Miksch, C., Morozov, K. I., Leshansky, A. M., Fischer, P.

ACS Nano, 8(9):8794-8801, June 2014, Featured cover article. (article)

Abstract
Tissue and biological fluids are complex viscoelastic media with a nanoporous macromolecular structure. Here, we demonstrate that helical nanopropellers can be controllably steered through such a biological gel. The screw-propellers have a filament diameter of about 70 nm and are smaller than previously reported nanopropellers as well as any swimming microorganism. We show that the nanoscrews will move through high-viscosity solutions with comparable velocities to that of larger micropropellers, even though they are so small that Brownian forces suppress their actuation in pure water. When actuated in viscoelastic hyaluronan gels, the nanopropellers appear to have a significant advantage, as they are of the same size range as the gel’s mesh size. Whereas larger helices will show very low or negligible propulsion in hyaluronan solutions, the nanoscrews actually display significantly enhanced propulsion velocities that exceed the highest measured speeds in Newtonian fluids. The nanopropellers are not only promising for applications in the extracellular environment but small enough to be taken up by cells.

Featured cover article.

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Video - Helical Micro and Nanopropellers for Applications in Biological Fluidic Environments link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Convertor
Convertor

Fischer, P., Mark, A.

May 2014 (patent)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


3D nanofabrication on complex seed shapes using glancing angle deposition
3D nanofabrication on complex seed shapes using glancing angle deposition

Hyeon-Ho, J., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Reindl, T., Waizmann, U., Weis, J., Fischer, P.

In 2014 IEEE 27th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), pages: 437-440, January 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) fabrication techniques promise new device architectures and enable the integration of more components, but fabricating 3D nanostructures for device applications remains challenging. Recently, we have performed glancing angle deposition (GLAD) upon a nanoscale hexagonal seed array to create a variety of 3D nanoscale objects including multicomponent rods, helices, and zigzags [1]. Here, in an effort to generalize our technique, we present a step-by-step approach to grow 3D nanostructures on more complex nanoseed shapes and configurations than before. This approach allows us to create 3D nanostructures on nanoseeds regardless of seed sizes and shapes.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Circular polarization interferometry: circularly polarized modes of cholesteric liquid crystals
Circular polarization interferometry: circularly polarized modes of cholesteric liquid crystals

Sanchez-Castillo, A., Eslami, S., Giesselmann, F., Fischer, P.

OPTICS EXPRESS, 22(25):31227-31236, 2014 (article)

Abstract
We describe a novel polarization interferometer which permits the determination of the refractive indices for circularly-polarized light. It is based on a Jamin-Lebedeff interferometer, modified with waveplates, and permits us to experimentally determine the refractive indices n(L) and n(R) of the respectively left- and right-circularly polarized modes in a cholesteric liquid crystal. Whereas optical rotation measurements only determine the circular birefringence, i.e. the difference (n(L) - n(R)), the interferometer also permits the determination of their absolute values. We report refractive indices of a cholesteric liquid crystal in the region of selective (Bragg) reflection as a function of temperature. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Self-Propelling Nanomotors in the Presence of Strong Brownian Forces
Self-Propelling Nanomotors in the Presence of Strong Brownian Forces

Lee, T., Alarcon-Correa, M., Miksch, C., Hahn, K., Gibbs, J. G., Fischer, P.

NANO LETTERS, 14(5):2407-2412, 2014 (article)

Abstract
Motility in living systems is due to an array of complex molecular nanomotors that are essential for the function and survival of cells. These protein nanomotors operate not only despite of but also because of stochastic forces. Artificial means of realizing motility rely on local concentration or temperature gradients that are established across a particle, resulting in slip velocities at the particle surface and thus motion of the particle relative to the fluid. However, it remains unclear if these artificial motors can function at the smallest of scales, where Brownian motion dominates and no actively propelled living organisms can be found. Recently, the first reports have appeared suggesting that the swimming mechanisms of artificial structures may also apply to enzymes that are catalytically active. Here we report a scheme to realize artificial Janus nanoparticles (JNPs) with an overall size that is comparable to that of some enzymes similar to 30 nm. Our JNPs can catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen and thus actively move by self-electrophoresis. Geometric anisotropy of the Pt-Au Janus nanoparticles permits the simultaneous observation of their translational and rotational motion by dynamic light scattering. While their dynamics is strongly influenced by Brownian rotation, the artificial Janus nanomotors show bursts of linear ballistic motion resulting in enhanced diffusion.

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DOI [BibTex]


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A Self-Tuning LQR Approach Demonstrated on an Inverted Pendulum

Trimpe, S., Millane, A., Doessegger, S., D’Andrea, R.

In Proceedings of the 19th IFAC World Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 2014 (inproceedings)

am ics

PDF Supplementary material DOI [BibTex]

PDF Supplementary material DOI [BibTex]


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Ultracompact Three-Dimensional Tubular Conductivity Microsensors for Ionic and Biosensing Applications

Martinez-Cisneros, C. S., Sanchez, S., Schmidt, O. G., Xi, W.

Nano Letters, pages: 2219-2224, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2014 (article)

Abstract
We present ultracompact three-dimensional tubular structures integrating Au-based electrodes as impedimetric microsensors for the in-flow determination of mono- and divalent ionic species and HeLa cells. The microsensors show an improved performance of 2 orders of magnitude (limit of detection \textequals 0.1 nM for KCl) compared to conventional planar conductivity detection systems integrated in microfluidic platforms and the capability to detect single HeLa cells in flowing phosphate buffered saline. These highly integrated conductivity tubular sensors thus open new possibilities for lab-in-a-tube devices for bioapplications such as biosensing and bioelectronics.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Catalytic nanomotors for environmental monitoring and water remediation

Soler, L., Sanchez, S.

Nanoscale, 6(13):7175-7182, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Proton-proton collisions at ultra-relativistic energies in quark-gluon string model

Bravina, L., Bleibel, J., Malinina, L., Nilsson, M. S., Zabrodin, E.

EPJ Web of Conferences, 70, EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Hydrodynamic interactions induce anomalous diffusion under partial confinement

Bleibel, J., Dominguez, A., Günther, F., Harting, J., Oettel, M.

Soft Matter, 10(17):2945-2948, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Clay nanotube encapsulation for functional biocomposites

Lvov, Y., Aerov, Artem A., Aerov, A. A., Fakhrullin, R.

Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, 207, pages: 189-198, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Shape control in wafer-based aperiodic 3D nanostructures
Shape control in wafer-based aperiodic 3D nanostructures

Hyeon-Ho, J., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Reindl, T., Waizmann, U., Weis, J., Fischer, P.

NANOTECHNOLOGY, 25(23), 2014, Cover article. (article)

Abstract
Controlled local fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures is important to explore and enhance the function of single nanodevices, but is experimentally challenging. We present a scheme based on e-beam lithography (EBL) written seeds, and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) grown structures to create nanoscale objects with defined shapes but in aperiodic arrangements. By using a continuous sacrificial corral surrounding the features of interest we grow isolated 3D nanostructures that have complex cross-sections and sidewall morphology that are surrounded by zones of clean substrate.

Cover article.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Limiting Property of the Matrix Exponential

Trimpe, S., D’Andrea, R.

IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 59(4):1105-1110, 2014 (article)

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PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Control of Self-Propelled Microjets Inside a Microchannel With Time-Varying Flow Rates

Magdanz, V., Sanchez, S., Schmidt, O. G., Khalil, I. S. M., Misra, S.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, pages: 49-58, IEEE, New York, NY, 2014 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate the closed-loop motion control of self-propelled microjets inside a fluidic microchannel. The motion control of the microjets is achieved in hydrogen peroxide solution with time-varying flow rates, under the influence of the controlled magnetic fields and the self-propulsion force. Magnetic dipole mo- ment of the microjets is characterized using the U-turn and the rotating field techniques. The characterized magnetic dipole mo- ment has an average of 1.4 $\times$ 10 \textminus 13 A.m 2 at magnetic field, linear velocity, and boundary frequency of 2 mT, 100 $\mu$ m/s, and 25 rad/s, respectively. We implement a closed-loop control system that is based on the characterized magnetic dipole moment of the mi- crojets. This closed-loop control system positions the microjets by directing the magnetic field lines toward the reference position. Experiments are done using a magnetic system and a fluidic mi- crochannel with a width of 500 $\mu$ m. In the absence of a fluid flow, our control system positions the microjets at an average velocity and within an average region-of-convergence (ROC) of 119 $\mu$ m/s and 390 $\mu$ m, respectively. As a representative case, we observe that our control system positions the microjets at an average velocity and within an average ROC of 90 $\mu$ m/s and 600 $\mu$ m and 120 $\mu$ m/s and 600 $\mu$ m when a flow rate of 2.5 $\mu$ l/min is applied against and along the direction of the microjets, respectively. Furthermore, the average velocity and ROC are determined throughout the flow range (0 to 7.5 $\mu$ l/min) to characterize the motion of the microjets inside the microchannel

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Electrostatic interaction between colloidal particles trapped at an electrolyte interface

Majee, A., Bier, M., Dietrich, S.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 140(16), American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, N.Y., 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Capillary attraction induced collapse of colloidal monolayers at fluid interfaces

Bleibel, J., Dominguez, A., Oettel, M., Dietrich, S.

Soft Matter, 10(23):4091-4109, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Trapping self-propelled micromotors with microfabricated chevron and heart-shaped chips

Restrepo-Pérez, L., Soler, L., Mart\’\inez-Cisneros, C. S., Sanchez, S., Schmidt, O. G.

Lab on a Chip, 14(9):1515-1518, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Order of wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions

Ibagon, I., Bier, M., Dietrich, S.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 140(17), American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, N.Y., 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Specific salt effects on thermophoresis of charged colloids

Eslahian, K. A., Majee, A., Maskos, M., Würger, A.

Soft Matter, 10(12):1931-1936, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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H5MD: A structured, efficient, and portable file format for molecular data

De Buyl, P., Colberg, P. H., Höfling, F.

Computer Physics Communications, 185(6):1546-1553, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Emergent Long-Range Couplings in Arrays of Fluid Cells

Abraham, D. B., Maciolek, A., Vasilyev, O.

Physical Review Letters, 113(7), American Physical Society, Woodbury, N.Y., 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Active Microrheology of the Vitreous of the Eye applied to Nanorobot Propulsion
Active Microrheology of the Vitreous of the Eye applied to Nanorobot Propulsion

Qiu, T., Schamel, D., Mark, A. G., Fischer, P.

In 2014 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION (ICRA), pages: 3801-3806, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation ICRA, 2014, Best Automation Paper Award – Finalist. (inproceedings)

Abstract
Biomedical applications of micro or nanorobots require active movement through complex biological fluids. These are generally non-Newtonian (viscoelastic) fluids that are characterized by complicated networks of macromolecules that have size-dependent rheological properties. It has been suggested that an untethered microrobot could assist in retinal surgical procedures. To do this it must navigate the vitreous humor, a hydrated double network of collagen fibrils and high molecular-weight, polyanionic hyaluronan macromolecules. Here, we examine the characteristic size that potential robots must have to traverse vitreous relatively unhindered. We have constructed magnetic tweezers that provide a large gradient of up to 320 T/m to pull sub-micron paramagnetic beads through biological fluids. A novel two-step electrical discharge machining (EDM) approach is used to construct the tips of the magnetic tweezers with a resolution of 30 mu m and high aspect ratio of similar to 17:1 that restricts the magnetic field gradient to the plane of observation. We report measurements on porcine vitreous. In agreement with structural data and passive Brownian diffusion studies we find that the unhindered active propulsion through the eye calls for nanorobots with cross-sections of less than 500 nm.

Best Automation Paper Award – Finalist.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Event-Based State Estimation With Variance-Based Triggering

Trimpe, S., D’Andrea, R.

IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 59(12):3266-3281, 2014 (article)

am ics

PDF Supplementary material DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Supplementary material DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Effective interaction between a colloid and a soft interface near criticality

Law, A. D., Harnau, L., Tröndle, M., Dietrich, S.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 141(13), 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Tubular micro- nanorobots: smart design for bio-related applications

Sanchez, S., Wang, X., Solovev, A. A., Soler, L., Magdanz, V., Schmidt, O. G.

In Small-Scale Robotics, 8336, pages: 16-27, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer, Karlsruhe, 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We designed microrobots in the form of autonomous and remotely guided microtubes. One of the challenges at small scales is the effective conversion of energy into mechanical force to overcome the high viscosity of the fluid at low Reynolds numbers. This can be achieved by integration of catalytic nano-materials and processes to decompose chemical fuels. However, up to now, mostly hydrogen peroxide has been employed as a fuel which renders the potential applications in biomedicine and in vivo experiments. Therefore, other sources of energy to achieve motion at the micro- nanoscale are highly sought-after. Here, we present different types of tubular micro- and nanorobots, alternative approaches to toxic fuels and also, steps towards the use of tubular microrobots as micro- and nanotools

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Photoactive rolled-up TiO2 microtubes: fabrition, characterization and applications

Giuducatti, S., Marz, S. M., Soler, L., Madani, A., Jorgensen, M. R., Sanchez, S., Schmidt, O. G.

Journal of Materials Chemistry C: Materials for Optical and Electronic Devices, pages: 5892-5901, Royal Society of Chemistry, London, UK, 2014 (article)

Abstract
Because of its unique properties, titania (TiO2) represents a promising candidate in a wide variety of research fields. In this paper, some of the properties and potential applications of titania within rolled-up nanotechnology are explored. It is shown how the structural and optical properties of rolled titania microtubes can be controlled by properly tuning the microfabrication parameters. The rolling up of titania films on different sacrificial layers and containing different shapes, achieving a control on the diameter of the fabricated titania microtubes, is presented. In order to obtain the more photoactive crystalline form of titania, one during-fabrication and two post-fabrication methods are demonstrated. Interesting applications in the fields of photocatalysis and photonics are suggested: the use of titania rolled-up microtubes as micromotors and optical microresonators is presented.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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How ions in solution can change the sign of the critical Casimir potential

Pousaneh, F., Ciach, A., Maciolek, A.

Soft Matter, 10(3):470-483, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Critical Casimir interactions around the consolute point of a binary solvent

Mohry, T. F., Kondrat, S., Maciolek, A., Dietrich, S.

Soft Matter, 10(30):5510-5522, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Collapse and reversibility of the superhydrophobic state on nanotextured surfaces

Checco, A., Ocko, B. M., Rahman, A., Black, C. T., Tasinkevych, M., Giacomello, A., Dietrich, S.

Physical Review Letters, 112(21), American Physical Society., Woodbury, N.Y., etc., 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Density functional theory of electrowetting

Bier, M., Ibagon, I.

Physical Review E, 89(4), American Physical Society, Melville, NY, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Swimming by reciprocal motion at low Reynolds number
Swimming by reciprocal motion at low Reynolds number

Qiu, T., Lee, T., Mark, A. G., Morozov, K. I., Muenster, R., Mierka, O., Turek, S., Leshansky, A. M., Fischer, P.

NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 5, 2014, Max Planck Press Release. (article)

Abstract
Biological microorganisms swim with flagella and cilia that execute nonreciprocal motions for low Reynolds number (Re) propulsion in viscous fluids. This symmetry requirement is a consequence of Purcell's scallop theorem, which complicates the actuation scheme needed by microswimmers. However, most biomedically important fluids are non-Newtonian where the scallop theorem no longer holds. It should therefore be possible to realize a microswimmer that moves with reciprocal periodic body-shape changes in non-Newtonian fluids. Here we report a symmetric `micro-scallop', a single-hinge microswimmer that can propel in shear thickening and shear thinning (non-Newtonian) fluids by reciprocal motion at low Re. Excellent agreement between our measurements and both numerical and analytical theoretical predictions indicates that the net propulsion is caused by modulation of the fluid viscosity upon varying the shear rate. This reciprocal swimming mechanism opens new possibilities in designing biomedical microdevices that can propel by a simple actuation scheme in non-Newtonian biological fluids.

Max Planck Press Release.

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Video - A Swimming Micro-Scallop Video - Winner of the Micro-robotic Design Challenge in Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics DOI [BibTex]

Video - A Swimming Micro-Scallop Video - Winner of the Micro-robotic Design Challenge in Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics DOI [BibTex]


Nanohelices by shadow growth
Nanohelices by shadow growth

Gibbs, J. G., Mark, A. G., Lee, T., Eslami, S., Schamel, D., Fischer, P.

NANOSCALE, 6(16):9457-9466, 2014 (article)

Abstract
The helix has remarkable qualities and is prevalent in many fields including mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. This shape, which is chiral by nature, is ubiquitous in biology with perhaps the most famous example being DNA. Other naturally occurring helices are common at the nanoscale in the form of protein secondary structures and in various macromolecules. Nanoscale helices exhibit a wide range of interesting mechanical, optical, and electrical properties which can be intentionally engineered into the structure by choosing the correct morphology and material. As technology advances, these fabrication parameters can be fine-tuned and matched to the application of interest. Herein, we focus on the fabrication and properties of nanohelices grown by a dynamic shadowing growth method combined with fast wafer-scale substrate patterning which has a number of distinct advantages. We review the fabrication methodology and provide several examples that illustrate the generality and utility of nanohelices shadow-grown on nanopatterns.

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Video - Fabrication of Designer Nanostructures DOI [BibTex]


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Alignment of cylindrical colloids near chemically patterned substrates induced by critical Casimir torques

Labbe-Laurent, M., Tröndle, M., Harnau, L., Dietrich, S.

Soft Matter, 10(13):2270-2291, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Heat transfer between anisotropic nanoparticles: Enhancement and switching

Incardone, R., Emig, T., Krüger, M.

Europhysics Letters, 106(4), 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Rolled-up Functionalized Nanomembranes as Three-Dimensional Cavities for Single Cell Studies

Xi, W., Schmidt, C., Sanchez, S., Gracias, D., Carazo-Salas, R., Jackson, S., Schmidt, O. G.

Nano Letters, 14(8):4197-4204, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Finite-size scaling study of shear viscosity anomaly at liquid-liquid criticality

Roy, S., Das, S. K.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, 141(23), 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Cosmology in a petri dish? Simulation of collective dynamics of colloids at fluid interfaces

Bleibel, J.

In EPJ Web of Conferences, 70, EDP Sciences, 2014 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]


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Dispersions of ellipsoidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal

Tasinkevych, M., Mondiot, F., Mondain-Monval, O., Loudet, J. C.

Soft Matter, 10(12):2047-2058, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Critical Casimir interactions between spherical particles in the presence of bulk ordering fields

Vasilyev, O.

Physical Review E, 90, American Physical Society, Melville, NY, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Towards Template-Assisted Assembly of Nematic Colloids

Silvestre, N. M., Liu, Q., Senyuk, B., Smalyukh, I. I., Tasinkevych, M.

Physical Review Letters, 112(22), American Physical Society, Woodbury, N.Y., 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Chiral Nanomagnets
Chiral Nanomagnets

Eslami, S., Gibbs, J. G., Rechkemmer, Y., van Slageren, J., Alarcon-Correa, M., Lee, T., Mark, A. G., Rikken, G. L. J. A., Fischer, P.

ACS PHOTONICS, 1(11):1231-1236, 2014 (article)

Abstract
We report on the enhanced optical properties of chiral magnetic nanohelices with critical dimensions comparable to the ferromagnetic domain size. They are shown to be ferromagnetic at room temperature, have defined chirality, and exhibit large optical activity in the visible as verified by electron microscopy, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, natural circular dichroism (NCD), and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements. The structures exhibit magneto-chiral dichroism (MChD), which directly demonstrates coupling between their structural chirality and magnetism. A chiral nickel (Ni) film consisting of an array of nanohelices similar to 100 nm in length exhibits an MChD anisotropy factor g(MChD) approximate to 10(-4) T-1 at room temperature in a saturation field of similar to 0.2 T, permitting polarization-independent control of the film's absorption properties through magnetic field modulation. This is also the first report of MChD in a material with structural chirality on the order of the wavelength of light, and therefore the Ni nanohelix array is a metamaterial with magnetochiral properties that can be tailored through a dynamic deposition process.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Wireless powering of e-swimmers
Wireless powering of e-swimmers

Roche, J., Carrara, S., Sanchez, J., Lannelongue, J., Loget, G., Bouffier, L., Fischer, P., Kuhn, A.

SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 4, 2014 (article)

Abstract
Miniaturized structures that can move in a controlled way in solution and integrate various functionalities are attracting considerable attention due to the potential applications in fields ranging from autonomous micromotors to roving sensors. Here we introduce a concept which allows, depending on their specific design, the controlled directional motion of objects in water, combined with electronic functionalities such as the emission of light, sensing, signal conversion, treatment and transmission. The approach is based on electric field-induced polarization, which triggers different chemical reactions at the surface of the object and thereby its propulsion. This results in a localized electric current that can power in a wireless way electronic devices in water, leading to a new class of electronic swimmers (e-swimmers).

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Swelling and shrinking behaviour of photoresponsive phosphonium-based ionogel microstructures
Swelling and shrinking behaviour of photoresponsive phosphonium-based ionogel microstructures

Czugala, M., O’Connell, C., Blin, C., Fischer, P., Fraser, K. J., Benito-Lopez, F., Diamond, D.

SENSORS AND ACTUATORS B-CHEMICAL, 194, pages: 105-113, 2014 (article)

Abstract
Photoresponsive N-isopropylacrylamide ionogel microstructures are presented in this study. These ionogels are synthesised using phosphonium based room temperature ionic liquids, together with the photochromic compound benzospiropyran. The microstructures can be actuated using light irradiation, facilitating non-contact and non-invasive operation. For the first time, the characterisation of the swelling and shrinking behaviour of several photopatterned ionogel microstructures is presented and the influence of surface-area-to-volume ratio on the swelling kinetics is evaluated. It was found that the swelling and shrinking behaviour of the ionogels is strongly dependent on the nature of the ionic liquid. In particular, the {[}P-6,P-6,P-6,P-14]{[}NTf2] ionogel exhibits the greatest degree of swelling, reaching up to 180\% of its initial size, and the fastest shrinkage rate (k(sh) = 29 +/- 4 x 10(-2) s(-1)). (C) 2014 Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Stability Analysis of Distributed Event-Based State Estimation

Trimpe, S.

In Proceedings of the 53rd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Los Angeles, CA, 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
An approach for distributed and event-based state estimation that was proposed in previous work [1] is analyzed and extended to practical networked systems in this paper. Multiple sensor-actuator-agents observe a dynamic process, sporadically exchange their measurements over a broadcast network according to an event-based protocol, and estimate the process state from the received data. The event-based approach was shown in [1] to mimic a centralized Luenberger observer up to guaranteed bounds, under the assumption of identical estimates on all agents. This assumption, however, is unrealistic (it is violated by a single packet drop or slight numerical inaccuracy) and removed herein. By means of a simulation example, it is shown that non-identical estimates can actually destabilize the overall system. To achieve stability, the event-based communication scheme is supplemented by periodic (but infrequent) exchange of the agentsâ?? estimates and reset to their joint average. When the local estimates are used for feedback control, the stability guarantee for the estimation problem extends to the event-based control system.

am ics

PDF Supplementary material DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Supplementary material DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Biocompatible, accurate, and fully autonomous: a sperm-driven micro-bio-robot

Khalil, I. S. M., Magdanz, V., Sanchez, S., Schmidt, O. G., Misra, S.

Journal of Micro-Bio Robotics, 9(3-4):79-86, 2014 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]