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2015


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Enzymatically active biomimetic micropropellers for the penetration of mucin gels

Walker (Schamel), D., Käsdorf, B. T., Jeong, H. H., Lieleg, O., Fischer, P.

Science Advances, 1(11):e1500501, December 2015 (article)

Abstract
In the body, mucus provides an important defense mechanism by limiting the penetration of pathogens. It is therefore also a major obstacle for the efficient delivery of particle-based drug carriers. The acidic stomach lining in particular is difficult to overcome because mucin glycoproteins form viscoelastic gels under acidic conditions. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori has developed a strategy to overcome the mucus barrier by producing the enzyme urease, which locally raises the pH and consequently liquefies the mucus. This allows the bacteria to swim through mucus and to reach the epithelial surface. We present an artificial system of reactive magnetic micropropellers that mimic this strategy to move through gastric mucin gels by making use of surface-immobilized urease. The results demonstrate the validity of this biomimetic approach to penetrate biological gels, and show that externally propelled microstructures can actively and reversibly manipulate the physical state of their surroundings, suggesting that such particles could potentially penetrate native mucus.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2015


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Reducing Student Anonymity and Increasing Engagement

Kuchenbecker, K. J.

University of Pennsylvania Almanac, 62(18):8, November 2015 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Surgeons and Non-Surgeons Prefer Haptic Feedback of Instrument Vibrations During Robotic Surgery

Koehn, J. K., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 29(10):2970-2983, October 2015 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Displaying Sensed Tactile Cues with a Fingertip Haptic Device

Pacchierotti, C., Prattichizzo, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 8(4):384-396, October 2015 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The EChemPen: A Guiding Hand To Learn Electrochemical Surface Modifications

Valetaud, M., Loget, G., Roche, J., Hueken, N., Fattah, Z., Badets, V., Fontaine, O., Zigah, D.

J. of Chem. Ed., 92(10):1700-1704, September 2015 (article)

Abstract
The Electrochemical Pen (EChemPen) was developed as an attractive tool for learning electrochemistry. The fabrication, principle, and operation of the EChemPen are simple and can be easily performed by students in practical classes. It is based on a regular fountain pen principle, where the electrolytic solution is dispensed at a tip to locally modify a conductive surface by triggering a localized electrochemical reaction. Three simple model reactions were chosen to demonstrate the versatility of the EChemPen for teaching various electrochemical processes. We describe first the reversible writing/erasing of metal letters, then the electrodeposition of a black conducting polymer "ink", and finally the colorful writings that can be generated by titanium anodization and that can be controlled by the applied potential. These entertaining and didactic experiments are adapted for teaching undergraduate students that start to study electrochemistry by means of surface modification reactions.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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3D-printed Soft Microrobot for Swimming in Biological Fluids

Qiu, T., Palagi, S., Fischer, P.

In Conf. Proc. IEEE Eng. Med. Biol. Soc., pages: 4922-4925, August 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Microscopic artificial swimmers hold the potential to enable novel non-invasive medical procedures. In order to ease their translation towards real biomedical applications, simpler designs as well as cheaper yet more reliable materials and fabrication processes should be adopted, provided that the functionality of the microrobots can be kept. A simple single-hinge design could already enable microswimming in non-Newtonian fluids, which most bodily fluids are. Here, we address the fabrication of such single-hinge microrobots with a 3D-printed soft material. Firstly, a finite element model is developed to investigate the deformability of the 3D-printed microstructure under typical values of the actuating magnetic fields. Then the microstructures are fabricated by direct 3D-printing of a soft material and their swimming performances are evaluated. The speeds achieved with the 3D-printed microrobots are comparable to those obtained in previous work with complex fabrication procedures, thus showing great promise for 3D-printed microrobots to be operated in biological fluids.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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A thin film active-lens with translational control for dynamically programmable optical zoom

Yun, S., Park, S., Park, B., Nam, S., Park, S. K., Kyung, K.

Applied Physics Letters, 107(8):081907, AIP Publishing, August 2015 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate a thin film active-lens for rapidly and dynamically controllable optical zoom. The active-lens is composed of a convex hemispherical polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens structure working as an aperture and a dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane actuator, which is a combination of a thin DE layer made with PDMS and a compliant electrode pattern using silver-nanowires. The active-lens is capable of dynamically changing focal point of the soft aperture as high as 18.4% through its translational movement in vertical direction responding to electrically induced bulged-up deformation of the DE membrane actuator. Under operation with various sinusoidal voltage signals, the movement responses are fairly consistent with those estimated from numerical simulation. The responses are not only fast, fairly reversible, and highly durable during continuous cyclic operations, but also large enough to impart dynamic focus tunability for optical zoom in microscopic imaging devices with a light-weight and ultra-slim configuration.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Toward a large-scale visuo-haptic dataset for robotic learning

Burka, A., Hu, S., Krishnan, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Hendricks, L. A., Gao, Y., Darrell, T.

In Proc. CVPR Workshop on the Future of Datasets in Vision, 2015 (inproceedings)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Detecting Lumps in Simulated Tissue via Palpation with a BioTac

Hui, J., Block, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Hui (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Optimal Length of Low Reynolds Number Nanopropellers

Walker (Schamel), D., Kuebler, M., Morozov, K. I., Fischer, P., Leshansky, A. M.

Nano Letters, 15(7):4412-4416, June 2015 (article)

Abstract
Locomotion in fluids at the nanoscale is dominated by viscous drag. One efficient propulsion scheme is to use a weak rotating magnetic field that drives a chiral object. Froth bacterial flagella to artificial drills, the corkscrew is a universally useful chiral shape for propulsion in viscous environments. Externally powered magnetic micro- and nanomotors have been recently developed that allow for precise fuel-free propulsion in complex media. Here, we combine analytical and numerical theory with experiments on nanostructured screw-propellers to show that the optimal length is surprisingly short only about one helical turn, which is shorter than most of the structures in use to date. The results have important implications for the design of artificial actuated nano- and micropropellers and can dramatically reduce fabrication times, while ensuring optimal performance.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Analysis of the Instrument Vibrations and Contact Forces Caused by an Expert Robotic Surgeon Doing FRS Tasks

Brown, J. D., O’Brien, C., Miyasaka, K., Dumon, K. R., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics, pages: 75-76, London, England, June 2015, Poster presentation given by Brown (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Should Haptic Texture Vibrations Respond to User Force and Speed?

Culbertson, H., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In IEEE World Haptics Conference, pages: 106 - 112, Evanston, Illinois, USA, June 2015, Oral presentation given by Culbertson (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enabling the Baxter Robot to Play Hand-Clapping Games

Fitter, N. T., Neuburger, M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, June 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A theoretical study of potentially observable chirality-sensitive NMR effects in molecules

Garbacz, P., Cukras, J., Jaszunski, M.

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17(35):22642-22651, May 2015 (article)

Abstract
Two recently predicted nuclear magnetic resonance effects, the chirality-induced rotating electric polarization and the oscillating magnetization, are examined for several experimentally available chiral molecules. We discuss in detail the requirements for experimental detection of chirality-sensitive NMR effects of the studied molecules. These requirements are related to two parameters: the shielding polarizability and the antisymmetric part of the nuclear magnetic shielding tensor. The dominant second contribution has been computed for small molecules at the coupled cluster and density functional theory levels. It was found that DFT calculations using the KT2 functional and the aug-cc-pCVTZ basis set adequately reproduce the CCSD(T) values obtained with the same basis set. The largest values of parameters, thus most promising from the experimental point of view, were obtained for the fluorine nuclei in 1,3-difluorocyclopropene and 1,3-diphenyl-2-fluoro-3-trifluoromethylcyclopropene.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Dynamic Inclusion Complexes of Metal Nanoparticles Inside Nanocups

Alarcon-Correa, M., Lee, T. C., Fischer, P.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 54(23):6730-6734, May 2015, Featured cover article. (article)

Abstract
Host-guest inclusion complexes are abundant in molecular systems and of fundamental importance in living organisms. Realizing a colloidal analogue of a molecular dynamic inclusion complex is challenging because inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with a well-defined cavity and portal are difficult to synthesize in high yield and with good structural fidelity. Herein, a generic strategy towards the fabrication of dynamic 1: 1 inclusion complexes of metal nanoparticles inside oxide nanocups with high yield (> 70%) and regiospecificity (> 90%) by means of a reactive double Janus nanoparticle intermediate is reported. Experimental evidence confirms that the inclusion complexes are formed by a kinetically controlled mechanism involving a delicate interplay between bipolar galvanic corrosion and alloying-dealloying oxidation. Release of the NP guest from the nanocups can be efficiently triggered by an external stimulus. Featured cover article.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Data-Driven Motion Mappings Improve Transparency in Teleoperation

Khurshid, R. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 24(2):132-154, May 2015 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Surface roughness-induced speed increase for active Janus micromotors

Choudhury, U., Soler, L., Gibbs, J. G., Sanchez, S., Fischer, P.

Chem. Comm., 51(41):8660-8663, April 2015 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate a simple physical fabrication method to control surface roughness of Janus micromotors and fabricate self-propelled active Janus microparticles with rough catalytic platinum surfaces that show a four-fold increase in their propulsion speed compared to conventional Janus particles coated with a smooth Pt layer.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Using IMU Data to Teach a Robot Hand-Clapping Games

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 353-355, April 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Haptic Feedback in Transoral Robotic Surgery: A Feasibility Study

Bur, A. M., Gomez, E. D., Rassekh, C. H., Newman, J. G., Weinstein, G. S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Annual Meeting of the Triological Society at COSM, April 2015, Poster presentation given by Bur (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Haptic Textures for Online Shopping

Culbertson, H., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Interactive demonstrations in The Retail Collective exhibit, presented at the Dx3 Conference in Toronto, Canada, March 2015 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Active colloidal microdrills

Gibbs, J. G., Fischer, P.

Chem. Comm., 51(20):4192-4195, Febuary 2015 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate a chemically driven, autonomous catalytic microdrill. An asymmetric distribution of catalyst causes the helical swimmer to twist while it undergoes directed propulsion. A driving torque and hydrodynamic coupling between translation and rotation at low Reynolds number leads to drill-like swimming behaviour.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Design and Validation of a Practical Simulator for Transoral Robotic Surgery

Bur, A. M., Gomez, E. D., Chalian, A. A., Newman, J. G., Weinstein, G. S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Society for Robotic Surgery Annual Meeting: Transoral Program, (T8), February 2015, Oral presentation given by Bur (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robotic Learning of Haptic Adjectives Through Physical Interaction

Chu, V., McMahon, I., Riano, L., McDonald, C. G., He, Q., Perez-Tejada, J. M., Arrigo, M., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 63(3):279-292, 2015, Vivian Chu, Ian MacMahon, and Lorenzo Riano contributed equally to this publication. Corrigendum published in June 2016 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback on Human Motor Learning of Arbitrary Arm Motions

Bark, K., Hyman, E., Tan, F., Cha, E., Jax, S. A., Buxbaum, L. J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 23(1):51-63, January 2015 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Selectable Nanopattern Arrays for Nanolithographic Imprint and Etch-Mask Applications

Jeong, H. H., Mark, A. G., Lee, T., Son, K., Chen, W., Alarcon-Correa, M., Kim, I., Schütz, G., Fischer, P.

Adv. Science, 2(7):1500016, 2015, Featured cover article. (article)

Abstract
A parallel nanolithographic patterning method is presented that can be used to obtain arrays of multifunctional nanoparticles. These patterns can simply be converted into a variety of secondary nanopatterns that are useful for nanolithographic imprint, plasmonic, and etch-mask applications.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Haptic Robotization of Human Body via Data-Driven Vibrotactile Feedback

Kurihara, Y., Takei, S., Nakai, Y., Hachisu, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kajimoto, H.

Entertainment Computing, 5(4):485-494, December 2014 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Automatic Skill Evaluation for a Needle Passing Task in Robotic Surgery

Leung, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IROS Workshop on the Role of Human Sensorimotor Control in Robotic Surgery, Chicago, Illinois, sep 2014, Poster presentation given by Kuchenbecker. Best Poster Award (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Modeling and Rendering Realistic Textures from Unconstrained Tool-Surface Interactions

Culbertson, H., Unwin, J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 7(3):381-292, July 2014 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Nanopropellers and Their Actuation in Complex Viscoelastic Media

Schamel, D., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Miksch, C., Morozov, K. I., Leshansky, A. M., Fischer, P.

ACS Nano, 8(9):8794-8801, June 2014, Featured cover article. (article)

Abstract
Tissue and biological fluids are complex viscoelastic media with a nanoporous macromolecular structure. Here, we demonstrate that helical nanopropellers can be controllably steered through such a biological gel. The screw-propellers have a filament diameter of about 70 nm and are smaller than previously reported nanopropellers as well as any swimming microorganism. We show that the nanoscrews will move through high-viscosity solutions with comparable velocities to that of larger micropropellers, even though they are so small that Brownian forces suppress their actuation in pure water. When actuated in viscoelastic hyaluronan gels, the nanopropellers appear to have a significant advantage, as they are of the same size range as the gel’s mesh size. Whereas larger helices will show very low or negligible propulsion in hyaluronan solutions, the nanoscrews actually display significantly enhanced propulsion velocities that exceed the highest measured speeds in Newtonian fluids. The nanopropellers are not only promising for applications in the extracellular environment but small enough to be taken up by cells.

Featured cover article.

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Video - Helical Micro and Nanopropellers for Applications in Biological Fluidic Environments link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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A Data-driven Approach to Remote Tactile Interaction: From a BioTac Sensor to Any Fingertip Cutaneous Device

Pacchierotti, C., Prattichizzo, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Haptics: Neuroscience, Devices, Modeling, and Applications, Proc. EuroHaptics, Part I, 8618, pages: 418-424, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, June 2014, Poster presentation given by Pacchierotti in Versailles, France (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Evaluating the BioTac’s Ability to Detect and Characterize Lumps in Simulated Tissue

Hui, J. C. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Haptics: Neuroscience, Devices, Modeling, and Applications, Proc. EuroHaptics, Part II, 8619, pages: 295-302, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, June 2014, Poster presentation given by Hui in Versailles, France (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Teaching Forward and Inverse Kinematics of Robotic Manipulators Via MATLAB

Wong, D., Dames, P., J. Kuchenbecker, K.

June 2014, Presented at {\em ICRA Workshop on {MATLAB/Simulink} for Robotics Education and Research}. Oral presentation given by {Dames} and {Wong} (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Convertor

Fischer, P., Mark, A.

May 2014 (patent)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Analyzing Human High-Fives to Create an Effective High-Fiving Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), pages: 156-157, Bielefeld, Germany, March 2014, Poster presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dynamic Modeling and Control of Voice-Coil Actuators for High-Fidelity Display of Haptic Vibrations

McMahan, W., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 115-122, Houston, Texas, USA, February 2014, Oral presentation given by Kuchenbecker (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Wearable Device for Controlling a Robot Gripper With Fingertip Contact, Pressure, Vibrotactile, and Grip Force Feedback

Pierce, R. M., Fedalei, E. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 19-25, Houston, Texas, USA, February 2014, Oral presentation given by Pierce (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Methods for Robotic Tool-Mediated Haptic Surface Recognition

Romano, J. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 49-56, Houston, Texas, USA, February 2014, Oral presentation given by Kuchenbecker. Finalist for Best Paper Award (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Control of a Virtual Robot with Fingertip Contact, Pressure, Vibrotactile, and Grip Force Feedback

Pierce, R. M., Fedalei, E. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, Houston, Texas, USA, February 2014 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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One Hundred Data-Driven Haptic Texture Models and Open-Source Methods for Rendering on 3D Objects

Culbertson, H., Delgado, J. J. L., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 319-325, Houston, Texas, USA, February 2014, Poster presentation given by Culbertson. Finalist for Best Poster Award (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Modular Tactile Motion Guidance System

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Anon, A. M., Barkin, T., deVillafranca, K., Lo, M.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, Houston, Texas, USA, February 2014 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The Penn Haptic Texture Toolkit

Culbertson, H., Delgado, J. J. L., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, Houston, Texas, USA, February 2014 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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3D nanofabrication on complex seed shapes using glancing angle deposition

Hyeon-Ho, J., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Reindl, T., Waizmann, U., Weis, J., Fischer, P.

In 2014 IEEE 27th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), pages: 437-440, January 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) fabrication techniques promise new device architectures and enable the integration of more components, but fabricating 3D nanostructures for device applications remains challenging. Recently, we have performed glancing angle deposition (GLAD) upon a nanoscale hexagonal seed array to create a variety of 3D nanoscale objects including multicomponent rods, helices, and zigzags [1]. Here, in an effort to generalize our technique, we present a step-by-step approach to grow 3D nanostructures on more complex nanoseed shapes and configurations than before. This approach allows us to create 3D nanostructures on nanoseeds regardless of seed sizes and shapes.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Circular polarization interferometry: circularly polarized modes of cholesteric liquid crystals

Sanchez-Castillo, A., Eslami, S., Giesselmann, F., Fischer, P.

OPTICS EXPRESS, 22(25):31227-31236, 2014 (article)

Abstract
We describe a novel polarization interferometer which permits the determination of the refractive indices for circularly-polarized light. It is based on a Jamin-Lebedeff interferometer, modified with waveplates, and permits us to experimentally determine the refractive indices n(L) and n(R) of the respectively left- and right-circularly polarized modes in a cholesteric liquid crystal. Whereas optical rotation measurements only determine the circular birefringence, i.e. the difference (n(L) - n(R)), the interferometer also permits the determination of their absolute values. We report refractive indices of a cholesteric liquid crystal in the region of selective (Bragg) reflection as a function of temperature. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Self-Propelling Nanomotors in the Presence of Strong Brownian Forces

Lee, T., Alarcon-Correa, M., Miksch, C., Hahn, K., Gibbs, J. G., Fischer, P.

NANO LETTERS, 14(5):2407-2412, 2014 (article)

Abstract
Motility in living systems is due to an array of complex molecular nanomotors that are essential for the function and survival of cells. These protein nanomotors operate not only despite of but also because of stochastic forces. Artificial means of realizing motility rely on local concentration or temperature gradients that are established across a particle, resulting in slip velocities at the particle surface and thus motion of the particle relative to the fluid. However, it remains unclear if these artificial motors can function at the smallest of scales, where Brownian motion dominates and no actively propelled living organisms can be found. Recently, the first reports have appeared suggesting that the swimming mechanisms of artificial structures may also apply to enzymes that are catalytically active. Here we report a scheme to realize artificial Janus nanoparticles (JNPs) with an overall size that is comparable to that of some enzymes similar to 30 nm. Our JNPs can catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen and thus actively move by self-electrophoresis. Geometric anisotropy of the Pt-Au Janus nanoparticles permits the simultaneous observation of their translational and rotational motion by dynamic light scattering. While their dynamics is strongly influenced by Brownian rotation, the artificial Janus nanomotors show bursts of linear ballistic motion resulting in enhanced diffusion.

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DOI [BibTex]


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Shape control in wafer-based aperiodic 3D nanostructures

Hyeon-Ho, J., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Reindl, T., Waizmann, U., Weis, J., Fischer, P.

NANOTECHNOLOGY, 25(23), 2014, Cover article. (article)

Abstract
Controlled local fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures is important to explore and enhance the function of single nanodevices, but is experimentally challenging. We present a scheme based on e-beam lithography (EBL) written seeds, and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) grown structures to create nanoscale objects with defined shapes but in aperiodic arrangements. By using a continuous sacrificial corral surrounding the features of interest we grow isolated 3D nanostructures that have complex cross-sections and sidewall morphology that are surrounded by zones of clean substrate.

Cover article.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Active Microrheology of the Vitreous of the Eye applied to Nanorobot Propulsion

Qiu, T., Schamel, D., Mark, A. G., Fischer, P.

In 2014 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION (ICRA), pages: 3801-3806, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation ICRA, 2014, Best Automation Paper Award – Finalist. (inproceedings)

Abstract
Biomedical applications of micro or nanorobots require active movement through complex biological fluids. These are generally non-Newtonian (viscoelastic) fluids that are characterized by complicated networks of macromolecules that have size-dependent rheological properties. It has been suggested that an untethered microrobot could assist in retinal surgical procedures. To do this it must navigate the vitreous humor, a hydrated double network of collagen fibrils and high molecular-weight, polyanionic hyaluronan macromolecules. Here, we examine the characteristic size that potential robots must have to traverse vitreous relatively unhindered. We have constructed magnetic tweezers that provide a large gradient of up to 320 T/m to pull sub-micron paramagnetic beads through biological fluids. A novel two-step electrical discharge machining (EDM) approach is used to construct the tips of the magnetic tweezers with a resolution of 30 mu m and high aspect ratio of similar to 17:1 that restricts the magnetic field gradient to the plane of observation. We report measurements on porcine vitreous. In agreement with structural data and passive Brownian diffusion studies we find that the unhindered active propulsion through the eye calls for nanorobots with cross-sections of less than 500 nm.

Best Automation Paper Award – Finalist.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Cutaneous Feedback of Planar Fingertip Deformation and Vibration on a da Vinci Surgical Robot

Pacchierotti, C., Shirsat, P., Koehn, J. K., Prattichizzo, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IROS Workshop on the Role of Human Sensorimotor Control in Robotic Surgery, Chicago, Illinois, 2014, Poster presentation given by Koehn (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Swimming by reciprocal motion at low Reynolds number

Qiu, T., Lee, T., Mark, A. G., Morozov, K. I., Muenster, R., Mierka, O., Turek, S., Leshansky, A. M., Fischer, P.

NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 5, 2014, Max Planck Press Release. (article)

Abstract
Biological microorganisms swim with flagella and cilia that execute nonreciprocal motions for low Reynolds number (Re) propulsion in viscous fluids. This symmetry requirement is a consequence of Purcell's scallop theorem, which complicates the actuation scheme needed by microswimmers. However, most biomedically important fluids are non-Newtonian where the scallop theorem no longer holds. It should therefore be possible to realize a microswimmer that moves with reciprocal periodic body-shape changes in non-Newtonian fluids. Here we report a symmetric `micro-scallop', a single-hinge microswimmer that can propel in shear thickening and shear thinning (non-Newtonian) fluids by reciprocal motion at low Re. Excellent agreement between our measurements and both numerical and analytical theoretical predictions indicates that the net propulsion is caused by modulation of the fluid viscosity upon varying the shear rate. This reciprocal swimming mechanism opens new possibilities in designing biomedical microdevices that can propel by a simple actuation scheme in non-Newtonian biological fluids.

Max Planck Press Release.

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Video - A Swimming Micro-Scallop Video - Winner of the Micro-robotic Design Challenge in Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics DOI [BibTex]

Video - A Swimming Micro-Scallop Video - Winner of the Micro-robotic Design Challenge in Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics DOI [BibTex]