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Fischer, P., Mark, A.

May 2014 (patent)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


3D nanofabrication on complex seed shapes using glancing angle deposition
3D nanofabrication on complex seed shapes using glancing angle deposition

Hyeon-Ho, J., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Reindl, T., Waizmann, U., Weis, J., Fischer, P.

In 2014 IEEE 27th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), pages: 437-440, January 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) fabrication techniques promise new device architectures and enable the integration of more components, but fabricating 3D nanostructures for device applications remains challenging. Recently, we have performed glancing angle deposition (GLAD) upon a nanoscale hexagonal seed array to create a variety of 3D nanoscale objects including multicomponent rods, helices, and zigzags [1]. Here, in an effort to generalize our technique, we present a step-by-step approach to grow 3D nanostructures on more complex nanoseed shapes and configurations than before. This approach allows us to create 3D nanostructures on nanoseeds regardless of seed sizes and shapes.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Active Microrheology of the Vitreous of the Eye applied to Nanorobot Propulsion
Active Microrheology of the Vitreous of the Eye applied to Nanorobot Propulsion

Qiu, T., Schamel, D., Mark, A. G., Fischer, P.

In 2014 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION (ICRA), pages: 3801-3806, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation ICRA, 2014, Best Automation Paper Award – Finalist. (inproceedings)

Abstract
Biomedical applications of micro or nanorobots require active movement through complex biological fluids. These are generally non-Newtonian (viscoelastic) fluids that are characterized by complicated networks of macromolecules that have size-dependent rheological properties. It has been suggested that an untethered microrobot could assist in retinal surgical procedures. To do this it must navigate the vitreous humor, a hydrated double network of collagen fibrils and high molecular-weight, polyanionic hyaluronan macromolecules. Here, we examine the characteristic size that potential robots must have to traverse vitreous relatively unhindered. We have constructed magnetic tweezers that provide a large gradient of up to 320 T/m to pull sub-micron paramagnetic beads through biological fluids. A novel two-step electrical discharge machining (EDM) approach is used to construct the tips of the magnetic tweezers with a resolution of 30 mu m and high aspect ratio of similar to 17:1 that restricts the magnetic field gradient to the plane of observation. We report measurements on porcine vitreous. In agreement with structural data and passive Brownian diffusion studies we find that the unhindered active propulsion through the eye calls for nanorobots with cross-sections of less than 500 nm.

Best Automation Paper Award – Finalist.

pf

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Increasing the sensor performance using Au modified high temperature superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films

Katzer, C., Stahl, C., Michalowski, P., Treiber, S., Westernhausen, M., Schmidl, F., Seidel, P., Schütz, G., Albrecht, J.

In 507, IOP Pub., Genova, Italy, 2014 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Self-Exploration of the Stumpy Robot with Predictive Information Maximization

Martius, G., Jahn, L., Hauser, H., V. Hafner, V.

In Proc. From Animals to Animats, SAB 2014, 8575, pages: 32-42, LNCS, Springer, 2014 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2012


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Spin wave mediated magnetic vortex core reversal

Stoll, H.

In 8461, San Diego, California, USA, 2012 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]

2012


DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetization reversal behavior of nanogranular CoCrPt alloy thin films studied with magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy

Fischer, P., Im, M., Eimüller, T., Schütz, G., Shin, S.

In 286, pages: 311-314, Boulder, CO, USA, 2005 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Defects distribution of Pr2Fe14B hard magnetic magnet from amorphous to nanostructures characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy

Wu, Y. C., Sprengel, W., Reimann, K., Reichle, K. J., Goll, D., Würschum, R., Schaefer, H. E.

In PRICM 5. Proceedings of the Fifth Pacific RIM International Conference on Advanced Materials and Processing, 475-479, pages: 2123-2126, Materials Science Forum, Trans Tech, Beijing, China, 2005 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Implementing sub-ns time resolution into magnetic X-ray microscopies

Puzic, A., Stoll, H., Fischer, P., Van Waeyenberge, B., Raabe, J., Denbeaux, G., Haug, T., Weiss, D., Schütz, G.

In T115, pages: 1029-1031, Malmö/Lund, Sweden, 2005 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning to Feel the Physics of a Body

Der, R., Hesse, F., Martius, G.

In Computational Intelligence for Modelling, Control and Automation, CIMCA 2005 , 2, pages: 252-257, Washington, DC, USA, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Despite the tremendous progress in robotic hardware and in both sensorial and computing efficiencies the performance of contemporary autonomous robots is still far below that of simple animals. This has triggered an intensive search for alternative approaches to the control of robots. The present paper exemplifies a general approach to the self-organization of behavior which has been developed and tested in various examples in recent years. We apply this approach to an underactuated snake like artifact with a complex physical behavior which is not known to the controller. Due to the weak forces available, the controller so to say has to develop a kind of feeling for the body which is seen to emerge from our approach in a natural way with meandering and rotational collective modes being observed in computer simulation experiments.

al

[BibTex]

[BibTex]