Header logo is


2009


no image
Magnetic mobile micro-robots

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

7eme Journees Nationales de la Recherche en Robotique, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

2009


[BibTex]


no image
Gecko-Inspired Directional and Controllable Adhesion

Murphy, M. P., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Small, 5(2):170-175, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Multiple magnetic microrobot control using electrostatic anchoring

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 94(16):164108, AIP, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Wet self-cleaning of biologically inspired elastomer mushroom shaped microfibrillar adhesives

Kim, S., Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(13):7196-7199, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Robot ceiling climbers harness new tricks

Marks, Paul

New Scientist, 202(2705):18-19, Reed Business Information, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Biologically-Inspired Patterned and Coated Adhesives for Medical Devices

Glass, P, Chung, H, Lee, C, Tworkoski, E, Washburn, NR, Sitti, M

Journal of Medical Devices, 3(2):027537, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Modeling and experimental characterization of an untethered magnetic micro-robot

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 28(8):1077-1094, Sage Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Towards automated nanoassembly with the atomic force microscope: A versatile drift compensation procedure

Krohs, F., Onal, C., Sitti, M., Fatikow, S.

Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, 131(6):061106, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Valero-Cuevas, F., Hoffmann, H., Kurse, M. U., Kutch, J. J., Theodorou, E. A.

IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering – (All authors have equally contributed), (2):110?135, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Computational models of the neuromuscular system hold the potential to allow us to reach a deeper understanding of neuromuscular function and clinical rehabilitation by complementing experimentation. By serving as a means to distill and explore specific hypotheses, computational models emerge from prior experimental data and motivate future experimental work. Here we review computational tools used to understand neuromuscular function including musculoskeletal modeling, machine learning, control theory, and statistical model analysis. We conclude that these tools, when used in combination, have the potential to further our understanding of neuromuscular function by serving as a rigorous means to test scientific hypotheses in ways that complement and leverage experimental data.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
On-line learning and modulation of periodic movements with nonlinear dynamical systems

Gams, A., Ijspeert, A., Schaal, S., Lenarčič, J.

Autonomous Robots, 27(1):3-23, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Abstract  The paper presents a two-layered system for (1) learning and encoding a periodic signal without any knowledge on its frequency and waveform, and (2) modulating the learned periodic trajectory in response to external events. The system is used to learn periodic tasks on a humanoid HOAP-2 robot. The first layer of the system is a dynamical system responsible for extracting the fundamental frequency of the input signal, based on adaptive frequency oscillators. The second layer is a dynamical system responsible for learning of the waveform based on a built-in learning algorithm. By combining the two dynamical systems into one system we can rapidly teach new trajectories to robots without any knowledge of the frequency of the demonstration signal. The system extracts and learns only one period of the demonstration signal. Furthermore, the trajectories are robust to perturbations and can be modulated to cope with a dynamic environment. The system is computationally inexpensive, works on-line for any periodic signal, requires no additional signal processing to determine the frequency of the input signal and can be applied in parallel to multiple dimensions. Additionally, it can adapt to changes in frequency and shape, e.g. to non-stationary signals, such as hand-generated signals and human demonstrations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Local dimensionality reduction for non-parametric regression

Hoffman, H., Schaal, S., Vijayakumar, S.

Neural Processing Letters, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Locally-weighted regression is a computationally-efficient technique for non-linear regression. However, for high-dimensional data, this technique becomes numerically brittle and computationally too expensive if many local models need to be maintained simultaneously. Thus, local linear dimensionality reduction combined with locally-weighted regression seems to be a promising solution. In this context, we review linear dimensionality-reduction methods, compare their performance on nonparametric locally-linear regression, and discuss their ability to extend to incremental learning. The considered methods belong to the following three groups: (1) reducing dimensionality only on the input data, (2) modeling the joint input-output data distribution, and (3) optimizing the correlation between projection directions and output data. Group 1 contains principal component regression (PCR); group 2 contains principal component analysis (PCA) in joint input and output space, factor analysis, and probabilistic PCA; and group 3 contains reduced rank regression (RRR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression. Among the tested methods, only group 3 managed to achieve robust performance even for a non-optimal number of components (factors or projection directions). In contrast, group 1 and 2 failed for fewer components since these methods rely on the correct estimate of the true intrinsic dimensionality. In group 3, PLS is the only method for which a computationally-efficient incremental implementation exists. Thus, PLS appears to be ideally suited as a building block for a locally-weighted regressor in which projection directions are incrementally added on the fly.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Kim, S., Sitti, M.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(4):849-855, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Miniature devices: Voyage of the microrobots

Sitti, M.

Nature, 458(7242):1121-1122, Nature Publishing Group, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Dry spinning based spinneret based tunable engineered parameters (STEP) technique for controlled and aligned deposition of polymeric nanofibers

Nain, A. S., Sitti, M., Jacobson, A., Kowalewski, T., Amon, C.

Macromolecular rapid communications, 30(16):1406-1412, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Two-dimensional contact and noncontact micromanipulation in liquid using an untethered mobile magnetic microrobot

Floyd, S., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 25(6):1332-1342, IEEE, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A scaled bilateral control system for experimental one-dimensional teleoperated nanomanipulation

Onal, C. D., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 28(4):484-497, Sage Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A Swallowable Tethered Capsule Endoscope for Diagnosing Barrett’s Esophagus

Glass, P., Sitti, M., Pennathur, A., Appasamy, R.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 69(5):AB106, Mosby, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Adhesion of biologically inspired polymer microfibers on soft surfaces

Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6613-6616, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives

Sitti, M., Cusick, B., Aksak, B., Nese, A., Lee, H., Dong, H., Kowalewski, T., Matyjaszewski, K.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(10):2277-2287, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Incorporating Muscle Activation-Contraction dynamics to an optimal control framework for finger movements

Theodorou, Evangelos A., Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2009), 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Recent experimental and theoretical work [1] investigated the neural control of contact transition between motion and force during tapping with the index finger as a nonlinear optimization problem. Such transitions from motion to well-directed contact force are a fundamental part of dexterous manipulation. There are 3 alternative hypotheses of how this transition could be accomplished by the nervous system as a function of changes in direction and magnitude of the torque vector controlling the finger. These hypotheses are 1) an initial change in direction with a subsequent change in magnitude of the torque vector; 2) an initial change in magnitude with a subsequent directional change of the torque vector; and 3) a simultaneous and proportionally equal change of both direction and magnitude of the torque vector. Experimental work in [2] shows that the nervous system selects the first strategy, and in [1] we suggest that this may in fact be the optimal strategy. In [4] the framework of Iterative Linear Quadratic Optimal Regulator (ILQR) was extended to incorporate motion and force control. However, our prior simulation work assumed direct and instantaneous control of joint torques, which ignores the known delays and filtering properties of skeletal muscle. In this study, we implement an ILQR controller for a more biologically plausible biomechanical model of the index finger than [4], and add activation-contraction dynamics to the system to simulate muscle function. The planar biomechanical model includes the kinematics of the 3 joints while the applied torques are driven by activation?contraction dynamics with biologically plausible time constants [3]. In agreement with our experimental work [2], the task is to, within 500 ms, move the finger from a given resting configuration to target configuration with a desired terminal velocity. ILQR does not only stabilize the finger dynamics according to the objective function, but it also generates smooth joint space trajectories with minimal tuning and without an a-priori initial control policy (which is difficult to find for highly dimensional biomechanical systems). Furthemore, the use of this optimal control framework and the addition of activation-contraction dynamics considers the full nonlinear dynamics of the index finger and produces a sequence of postures which are compatible with experimental motion data [2]. These simulations combined with prior experimental results suggest that optimal control is a strong candidate for the generation of finger movements prior to abrupt motion-to-force transitions. This work is funded in part by grants NIH R01 0505520 and NSF EFRI-0836042 to Dr. Francisco J. Valero- Cuevas 1 Venkadesan M, Valero-Cuevas FJ. 
Effects of neuromuscular lags on controlling contact transitions. 
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: 2008. 2 Venkadesan M, Valero-Cuevas FJ. 
Neural Control of Motion-to-Force Transitions with the Fingertip. 
J. Neurosci., Feb 2008; 28: 1366 - 1373; 3 Zajac. Muscle and tendon: properties, models, scaling, and application to biomechanics and motor control. Crit Rev Biomed Eng, 17 4. Weiwei Li., Francisco Valero Cuevas: ?Linear Quadratic Optimal Control of Contact Transition with Fingertip ? ACC 2009

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
On-line learning and modulation of periodic movements with nonlinear dynamical systems

Gams, A., Ijspeert, A., Schaal, S., Lenarčič, J.

Autonomous Robots, 27(1):3-23, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Abstract  The paper presents a two-layered system for (1) learning and encoding a periodic signal without any knowledge on its frequency and waveform, and (2) modulating the learned periodic trajectory in response to external events. The system is used to learn periodic tasks on a humanoid HOAP-2 robot. The first layer of the system is a dynamical system responsible for extracting the fundamental frequency of the input signal, based on adaptive frequency oscillators. The second layer is a dynamical system responsible for learning of the waveform based on a built-in learning algorithm. By combining the two dynamical systems into one system we can rapidly teach new trajectories to robots without any knowledge of the frequency of the demonstration signal. The system extracts and learns only one period of the demonstration signal. Furthermore, the trajectories are robust to perturbations and can be modulated to cope with a dynamic environment. The system is computationally inexpensive, works on-line for any periodic signal, requires no additional signal processing to determine the frequency of the input signal and can be applied in parallel to multiple dimensions. Additionally, it can adapt to changes in frequency and shape, e.g. to non-stationary signals, such as hand-generated signals and human demonstrations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Reversible dry micro-fibrillar adhesives with thermally controllable adhesion

Kim, S., Sitti, M., Xie, T., Xiao, X.

Soft Matter, 5(19):3689-3693, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Enhanced reversible adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide-coated elastomer microfibrillar structures under wet conditions

Glass, P., Chung, H., Washburn, N. R., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6607-6612, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2007


no image
Space exploration-towards bio-inspired climbing robots

Menon, C., Murphy, M., Sitti, M., Lan, N.

INTECH Open Access Publisher, 2007 (misc)

pi

[BibTex]

2007


[BibTex]


no image
Bacterial flagella-based propulsion and on/off motion control of microscale objects

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 90(2):023902, AIP, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Friction of partially embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofibers inside elastomers

Aksak, B., Sitti, M., Cassell, A., Li, J., Meyyappan, M., Callen, P.

Applied Physics Letters, 91(6):061906, AIP, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Enhanced friction of elastomer microfiber adhesives with spatulate tips

Kim, S., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 91(22):221913, AIP, 2007 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
The new robotics - towards human-centered machines

Schaal, S.

HFSP Journal Frontiers of Interdisciplinary Research in the Life Sciences, 1(2):115-126, 2007, clmc (article)

Abstract
Research in robotics has moved away from its primary focus on industrial applications. The New Robotics is a vision that has been developed in past years by our own university and many other national and international research instiutions and addresses how increasingly more human-like robots can live among us and take over tasks where our current society has shortcomings. Elder care, physical therapy, child education, search and rescue, and general assistance in daily life situations are some of the examples that will benefit from the New Robotics in the near future. With these goals in mind, research for the New Robotics has to embrace a broad interdisciplinary approach, ranging from traditional mathematical issues of robotics to novel issues in psychology, neuroscience, and ethics. This paper outlines some of the important research problems that will need to be resolved to make the New Robotics a reality.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Microscale and nanoscale robotics systems [grand challenges of robotics]

Sitti, M.

IEEE Robotics \& Automation Magazine, 14(1):53-60, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A new biomimetic adhesive for therapeutic capsule endoscope applications in the gastrointestinal tract

Glass, P., Sitti, M., Appasamy, R.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 65(5):AB91, Mosby, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Visual servoing-based autonomous 2-D manipulation of microparticles using a nanoprobe

Onal, C. D., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on control systems technology, 15(5):842-852, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Adhesion of biologically inspired vertical and angled polymer microfiber arrays

Aksak, B., Murphy, M. P., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 23(6):3322-3332, ACS Publications, 2007 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Waalbot: An agile small-scale wall-climbing robot utilizing dry elastomer adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME transactions on Mechatronics, 12(3):330-338, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Subfeature patterning of organic and inorganic materials using robotic assembly

Tafazzoli, A., Cheng, C., Pawashe, C., Sabo, E. K., Trofin, L., Sitti, M., LeDuc, P. R.

Journal of materials research, 22(06):1601-1608, Cambridge University Press, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Effect of backing layer thickness on adhesion of single-level elastomer fiber arrays

Kim, S., Sitti, M., Hui, C., Long, R., Jagota, A.

Applied Physics Letters, 91(16):161905, AIP, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Adhesion and anisotropic friction enhancements of angled heterogeneous micro-fiber arrays with spherical and spatula tips

Murphy, M. P., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, 21(12-13):1281-1296, Taylor & Francis Group, 2007 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Surface-tension-driven biologically inspired water strider robots: Theory and experiments

Song, Y. S., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on robotics, 23(3):578-589, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2003


no image
Synthetic gecko foot-hair micro/nano-structures as dry adhesives

Sitti, M., Fearing, R. S.

Journal of adhesion science and technology, 17(8):1055-1073, Taylor & Francis Group, 2003 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

2003


Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Teleoperated touch feedback from the surfaces at the nanoscale: modeling and experiments

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

IEEE/ASME transactions on mechatronics, 8(2):287-298, IEEE, 2003 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Scaled teleoperation system for nano-scale interaction and manipulation

Sitti, M., Aruk, B., Shintani, H., Hashimoto, H.

Advanced Robotics, 17(3):275-291, Taylor & Francis Group, 2003 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Atomic force microscope probe based controlled pushing for nano-tribological characterization

Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, 8(3), 2003 (article)

pi

[BibTex]


no image
Computational approaches to motor learning by imitation

Schaal, S., Ijspeert, A., Billard, A.

Philosophical Transaction of the Royal Society of London: Series B, Biological Sciences, 358(1431):537-547, 2003, clmc (article)

Abstract
Movement imitation requires a complex set of mechanisms that map an observed movement of a teacher onto one's own movement apparatus. Relevant problems include movement recognition, pose estimation, pose tracking, body correspondence, coordinate transformation from external to egocentric space, matching of observed against previously learned movement, resolution of redundant degrees-of-freedom that are unconstrained by the observation, suitable movement representations for imitation, modularization of motor control, etc. All of these topics by themselves are active research problems in computational and neurobiological sciences, such that their combination into a complete imitation system remains a daunting undertaking - indeed, one could argue that we need to understand the complete perception-action loop. As a strategy to untangle the complexity of imitation, this paper will examine imitation purely from a computational point of view, i.e. we will review statistical and mathematical approaches that have been suggested for tackling parts of the imitation problem, and discuss their merits, disadvantages and underlying principles. Given the focus on action recognition of other contributions in this special issue, this paper will primarily emphasize the motor side of imitation, assuming that a perceptual system has already identified important features of a demonstrated movement and created their corresponding spatial information. Based on the formalization of motor control in terms of control policies and their associated performance criteria, useful taxonomies of imitation learning can be generated that clarify different approaches and future research directions.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Efficient charge recovery method for driving piezoelectric actuators with quasi-square waves

Campolo, D., Sitti, M., Fearing, R. S.

IEEE transactions on ultrasonics, ferroelectrics, and frequency control, 50(3):237-244, IEEE, 2003 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Piezoelectrically actuated four-bar mechanism with two flexible links for micromechanical flying insect thorax

Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME transactions on mechatronics, 8(1):26-36, IEEE, 2003 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

1997


no image
Locally weighted learning

Atkeson, C. G., Moore, A. W., Schaal, S.

Artificial Intelligence Review, 11(1-5):11-73, 1997, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper surveys locally weighted learning, a form of lazy learning and memory-based learning, and focuses on locally weighted linear regression. The survey discusses distance functions, smoothing parameters, weighting functions, local model structures, regularization of the estimates and bias, assessing predictions, handling noisy data and outliers, improving the quality of predictions by tuning fit parameters, interference between old and new data, implementing locally weighted learning efficiently, and applications of locally weighted learning. A companion paper surveys how locally weighted learning can be used in robot learning and control. Keywords: locally weighted regression, LOESS, LWR, lazy learning, memory-based learning, least commitment learning, distance functions, smoothing parameters, weighting functions, global tuning, local tuning, interference.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

1997


link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Locally weighted learning for control

Atkeson, C. G., Moore, A. W., Schaal, S.

Artificial Intelligence Review, 11(1-5):75-113, 1997, clmc (article)

Abstract
Lazy learning methods provide useful representations and training algorithms for learning about complex phenomena during autonomous adaptive control of complex systems. This paper surveys ways in which locally weighted learning, a type of lazy learning, has been applied by us to control tasks. We explain various forms that control tasks can take, and how this affects the choice of learning paradigm. The discussion section explores the interesting impact that explicitly remembering all previous experiences has on the problem of learning to control. Keywords: locally weighted regression, LOESS, LWR, lazy learning, memory-based learning, least commitment learning, forward models, inverse models, linear quadratic regulation (LQR), shifting setpoint algorithm, dynamic programming.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

1996


no image
A Kendama learning robot based on bi-directional theory

Miyamoto, H., Schaal, S., Gandolfo, F., Koike, Y., Osu, R., Nakano, E., Wada, Y., Kawato, M.

Neural Networks, 9(8):1281-1302, 1996, clmc (article)

Abstract
A general theory of movement-pattern perception based on bi-directional theory for sensory-motor integration can be used for motion capture and learning by watching in robotics. We demonstrate our methods using the game of Kendama, executed by the SARCOS Dextrous Slave Arm, which has a very similar kinematic structure to the human arm. Three ingredients have to be integrated for the successful execution of this task. The ingredients are (1) to extract via-points from a human movement trajectory using a forward-inverse relaxation model, (2) to treat via-points as a control variable while reconstructing the desired trajectory from all the via-points, and (3) to modify the via-points for successful execution. In order to test the validity of the via-point representation, we utilized a numerical model of the SARCOS arm, and examined the behavior of the system under several conditions.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

1996


link (url) [BibTex]


no image
One-handed juggling: A dynamical approach to a rhythmic movement task

Schaal, S., Sternad, D., Atkeson, C. G.

Journal of Motor Behavior, 28(2):165-183, 1996, clmc (article)

Abstract
The skill of rhythmic juggling a ball on a racket is investigated from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics. The difference equations that model the dynamical system are analyzed by means of local and non-local stability analyses. These analyses yield that the task dynamics offer an economical juggling pattern which is stable even for open-loop actuator motion. For this pattern, two types of pre dictions are extracted: (i) Stable periodic bouncing is sufficiently characterized by a negative acceleration of the racket at the moment of impact with the ball; (ii) A nonlinear scaling relation maps different juggling trajectories onto one topologically equivalent dynamical system. The relevance of these results for the human control of action was evaluated in an experiment where subjects performed a comparable task of juggling a ball on a paddle. Task manipulations involved different juggling heights and gravity conditions of the ball. The predictions were confirmed: (i) For stable rhythmic performance the paddle's acceleration at impact is negative and fluctuations of the impact acceleration follow predictions from global stability analysis; (ii) For each subject, the realizations of juggling for the different experimental conditions are related by the scaling relation. These results allow the conclusion that for the given task, humans reliably exploit the stable solutions inherent to the dynamics of the task and do not overrule these dynamics by other control mechanisms. The dynamical scaling serves as an efficient principle to generate different movement realizations from only a few parameter changes and is discussed as a dynamical formalization of the principle of motor equivalence.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]