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2011


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Learning, planning, and control for quadruped locomotion over challenging terrain

Kalakrishnan, Mrinal, Buchli, Jonas, Pastor, Peter, Mistry, Michael, Schaal, S.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 30(2):236-258, February 2011 (article)

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[BibTex]

2011


[BibTex]


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Design and application of a wire-driven bidirectional telescopic mechanism for workspace expansion with a focus on shipbuilding tasks

Lee, D., Chang, D., Shin, Y., Son, D., Kim, T., Lee, K., Kim, J.

Advanced Robotics, 25, 2011 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian robot system identification with input and output noise

Ting, J., D’Souza, A., Schaal, S.

Neural Networks, 24(1):99-108, 2011, clmc (article)

Abstract
For complex robots such as humanoids, model-based control is highly beneficial for accurate tracking while keeping negative feedback gains low for compliance. However, in such multi degree-of-freedom lightweight systems, conventional identification of rigid body dynamics models using CAD data and actuator models is inaccurate due to unknown nonlinear robot dynamic effects. An alternative method is data-driven parameter estimation, but significant noise in measured and inferred variables affects it adversely. Moreover, standard estimation procedures may give physically inconsistent results due to unmodeled nonlinearities or insufficiently rich data. This paper addresses these problems, proposing a Bayesian system identification technique for linear or piecewise linear systems. Inspired by Factor Analysis regression, we develop a computationally efficient variational Bayesian regression algorithm that is robust to ill-conditioned data, automatically detects relevant features, and identifies input and output noise. We evaluate our approach on rigid body parameter estimation for various robotic systems, achieving an error of up to three times lower than other state-of-the-art machine learning methods

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning variable impedance control

Buchli, J., Stulp, F., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 2011, clmc (article)

Abstract
One of the hallmarks of the performance, versatility, and robustness of biological motor control is the ability to adapt the impedance of the overall biomechanical system to different task requirements and stochastic disturbances. A transfer of this principle to robotics is desirable, for instance to enable robots to work robustly and safely in everyday human environments. It is, however, not trivial to derive variable impedance controllers for practical high degree-of-freedom (DOF) robotic tasks. In this contribution, we accomplish such variable impedance control with the reinforcement learning (RL) algorithm PISq ({f P}olicy {f I}mprovement with {f P}ath {f I}ntegrals). PISq is a model-free, sampling based learning method derived from first principles of stochastic optimal control. The PISq algorithm requires no tuning of algorithmic parameters besides the exploration noise. The designer can thus fully focus on cost function design to specify the task. From the viewpoint of robotics, a particular useful property of PISq is that it can scale to problems of many DOFs, so that reinforcement learning on real robotic systems becomes feasible. We sketch the PISq algorithm and its theoretical properties, and how it is applied to gain scheduling for variable impedance control. We evaluate our approach by presenting results on several simulated and real robots. We consider tasks involving accurate tracking through via-points, and manipulation tasks requiring physical contact with the environment. In these tasks, the optimal strategy requires both tuning of a reference trajectory emph{and} the impedance of the end-effector. The results show that we can use path integral based reinforcement learning not only for planning but also to derive variable gain feedback controllers in realistic scenarios. Thus, the power of variable impedance control is made available to a wide variety of robotic systems and practical applications.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Iterative path integral stochastic optimal control: Theory and applications to motor control

Theodorou, E. A.

University of Southern California, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2011 (phdthesis)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Learning of grasp selection based on shape-templates

Herzog, A.

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 2011 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Waalbot II: Adhesion recovery and improved performance of a climbing robot using fibrillar adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Kute, C., Mengüç, Y., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 30(1):118-133, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2011 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Automated 2-D nanoparticle manipulation using atomic force microscopy

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology, 10(3):472-481, IEEE, 2011 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Biaxial mechanical modeling of the small intestine

Bellini, C., Glass, P., Sitti, M., Di Martino, E. S.

Journal of the mechanical behavior of biomedical materials, 4(8):1727-1740, Elsevier, 2011 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Understanding haptics by evolving mechatronic systems

Loeb, G. E., Tsianos, G.A., Fishel, J.A., Wettels, N., Schaal, S.

Progress in Brain Research, 192, pages: 129, 2011 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Assembly and disassembly of magnetic mobile micro-robots towards deterministic 2-D reconfigurable micro-systems

Diller, E., Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 30(14):1667-1680, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2011 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Modeling of stochastic motion of bacteria propelled spherical microbeads

Arabagi, V., Behkam, B., Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

Journal of Applied Physics, 109(11):114702, AIP, 2011 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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The effect of aspect ratio on adhesion and stiffness for soft elastic fibres

Aksak, B., Hui, C., Sitti, M.

Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 8(61):1166-1175, The Royal Society, 2011 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Enhancing adhesion of biologically inspired polymer microfibers with a viscous oil coating

Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

The Journal of Adhesion, 87(6):547-557, Taylor & Francis Group, 2011 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Piezoelectric polymer fiber arrays for tactile sensing applications

Sümer, B., Aksak, B., Şsahin, K., Chuengsatiansup, K., Sitti, M.

Sensor Letters, 9(2):457-463, American Scientific Publishers, 2011 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Control methodologies for a heterogeneous group of untethered magnetic micro-robots

Floyd, S., Diller, E., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 30(13):1553-1565, SAGE Publications, 2011 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2010


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Policy learning algorithmis for motor learning (Algorithmen zum automatischen Erlernen von Motorfähigkigkeiten)

Peters, J., Kober, J., Schaal, S.

Automatisierungstechnik, 58(12):688-694, 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
Robot learning methods which allow au- tonomous robots to adapt to novel situations have been a long standing vision of robotics, artificial intelligence, and cognitive sciences. However, to date, learning techniques have yet to ful- fill this promise as only few methods manage to scale into the high-dimensional domains of manipulator robotics, or even the new upcoming trend of humanoid robotics. If possible, scaling was usually only achieved in precisely pre-structured domains. In this paper, we investigate the ingredients for a general ap- proach policy learning with the goal of an application to motor skill refinement in order to get one step closer towards human- like performance. For doing so, we study two major components for such an approach, i. e., firstly, we study policy learning algo- rithms which can be applied in the general setting of motor skill learning, and, secondly, we study a theoretically well-founded general approach to representing the required control structu- res for task representation and execution.

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link (url) [BibTex]


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Gait planning based on kinematics for a quadruped gecko model with redundancy

Son, D., Jeon, D., Nam, W. C., Chang, D., Seo, T., Kim, J.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 58, 2010 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Flat dry elastomer adhesives as attachment materials for climbing robots

Unver, O., Sitti, M.

IEEE transactions on robotics, 26(1):131-141, IEEE, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Bayesian approach to nonlinear parameter identification for rigid-body dynamics

Ting, J., DSouza, A., Schaal, S.

Neural Networks, 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
For complex robots such as humanoids, model-based control is highly beneficial for accurate tracking while keeping negative feedback gains low for compliance. However, in such multi degree-of-freedom lightweight systems, conventional identification of rigid body dynamics models using CAD data and actuator models is inaccurate due to unknown nonlinear robot dynamic effects. An alternative method is data-driven parameter estimation, but significant noise in measured and inferred variables affects it adversely. Moreover, standard estimation procedures may give physically inconsistent results due to unmodeled nonlinearities or insufficiently rich data. This paper addresses these problems, proposing a Bayesian system identification technique for linear or piecewise linear systems. Inspired by Factor Analysis regression, we develop a computationally efficient variational Bayesian regression algorithm that is robust to ill-conditioned data, automatically detects relevant features, and identifies input and output noise. We evaluate our approach on rigid body parameter estimation for various robotic systems, achieving an error of up to three times lower than other state-of-the-art machine learning methods.

am

link (url) [BibTex]


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A first optimal control solution for a complex, nonlinear, tendon driven neuromuscular finger model

Theodorou, E. A., Todorov, E., Valero-Cuevas, F.

Proceedings of the ASME 2010 Summer Bioengineering Conference August 30-September 2, 2010, Naples, Florida, USA, 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
In this work we present the first constrained stochastic op- timal feedback controller applied to a fully nonlinear, tendon driven index finger model. Our model also takes into account an extensor mechanism, and muscle force-length and force-velocity properties. We show this feedback controller is robust to noise and perturbations to the dynamics, while successfully handling the nonlinearities and high dimensionality of the system. By ex- tending prior methods, we are able to approximate physiological realism by ensuring positivity of neural commands and tendon tensions at all timesthus can, for the first time, use the optimal control framework to predict biologically plausible tendon tensions for a nonlinear neuromuscular finger model. METHODS 1 Muscle Model The rigid-body triple pendulum finger model with slightly viscous joints is actuated by Hill-type muscle models. Joint torques are generated by the seven muscles of the index fin-

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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An experimental analysis of elliptical adhesive contact

Sümer, B., Onal, C. D., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Journal of Applied Physics, 107(11):113512, AIP, 2010 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Efficient learning and feature detection in high dimensional regression

Ting, J., D’Souza, A., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

Neural Computation, 22, pages: 831-886, 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
We present a novel algorithm for efficient learning and feature selection in high- dimensional regression problems. We arrive at this model through a modification of the standard regression model, enabling us to derive a probabilistic version of the well-known statistical regression technique of backfitting. Using the Expectation- Maximization algorithm, along with variational approximation methods to overcome intractability, we extend our algorithm to include automatic relevance detection of the input features. This Variational Bayesian Least Squares (VBLS) approach retains its simplicity as a linear model, but offers a novel statistically robust â??black- boxâ? approach to generalized linear regression with high-dimensional inputs. It can be easily extended to nonlinear regression and classification problems. In particular, we derive the framework of sparse Bayesian learning, e.g., the Relevance Vector Machine, with VBLS at its core, offering significant computational and robustness advantages for this class of methods. We evaluate our algorithm on synthetic and neurophysiological data sets, as well as on standard regression and classification benchmark data sets, comparing it with other competitive statistical approaches and demonstrating its suitability as a drop-in replacement for other generalized linear regression techniques.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Stochastic Differential Dynamic Programming

Theodorou, E., Tassa, Y., Todorov, E.

In the proceedings of American Control Conference (ACC 2010) , 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
We present a generalization of the classic Differential Dynamic Programming algorithm. We assume the existence of state- and control-dependent process noise, and proceed to derive the second-order expansion of the cost-to-go. Despite having quartic and cubic terms in the initial expression, we show that these vanish, leaving us with the same quadratic structure as standard DDP.

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Enhanced wet adhesion and shear of elastomeric micro-fiber arrays with mushroom tip geometry and a photopolymerized p (DMA-co-MEA) tip coating

Glass, P., Chung, H., Washburn, N. R., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 26(22):17357-17362, American Chemical Society, 2010 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Learning control in robotics – trajectory-based opitimal control techniques

Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G.

Robotics and Automation Magazine, 17(2):20-29, 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
In a not too distant future, robots will be a natural part of daily life in human society, providing assistance in many areas ranging from clinical applications, education and care giving, to normal household environments [1]. It is hard to imagine that all possible tasks can be preprogrammed in such robots. Robots need to be able to learn, either by themselves or with the help of human supervision. Additionally, wear and tear on robots in daily use needs to be automatically compensated for, which requires a form of continuous self-calibration, another form of learning. Finally, robots need to react to stochastic and dynamic environments, i.e., they need to learn how to optimally adapt to uncertainty and unforeseen changes. Robot learning is going to be a key ingredient for the future of autonomous robots. While robot learning covers a rather large field, from learning to perceive, to plan, to make decisions, etc., we will focus this review on topics of learning control, in particular, as it is concerned with learning control in simulated or actual physical robots. In general, learning control refers to the process of acquiring a control strategy for a particular control system and a particular task by trial and error. Learning control is usually distinguished from adaptive control [2] in that the learning system can have rather general optimization objectivesâ??not just, e.g., minimal tracking errorâ??and is permitted to fail during the process of learning, while adaptive control emphasizes fast convergence without failure. Thus, learning control resembles the way that humans and animals acquire new movement strategies, while adaptive control is a special case of learning control that fulfills stringent performance constraints, e.g., as needed in life-critical systems like airplanes. Learning control has been an active topic of research for at least three decades. However, given the lack of working robots that actually use learning components, more work needs to be done before robot learning will make it beyond the laboratory environment. This article will survey some ongoing and past activities in robot learning to assess where the field stands and where it is going. We will largely focus on nonwheeled robots and less on topics of state estimation, as typically explored in wheeled robots [3]â??6], and we emphasize learning in continuous state-action spaces rather than discrete state-action spaces [7], [8]. We will illustrate the different topics of robot learning with examples from our own research with anthropomorphic and humanoid robots.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning, planning, and control for quadruped locomotion over challenging terrain

Kalakrishnan, M., Buchli, J., Pastor, P., Mistry, M., Schaal, S.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 30(2):236-258, 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
We present a control architecture for fast quadruped locomotion over rough terrain. We approach the problem by decomposing it into many sub-systems, in which we apply state-of-the-art learning, planning, optimization, and control techniques to achieve robust, fast locomotion. Unique features of our control strategy include: (1) a system that learns optimal foothold choices from expert demonstration using terrain templates, (2) a body trajectory optimizer based on the Zero- Moment Point (ZMP) stability criterion, and (3) a floating-base inverse dynamics controller that, in conjunction with force control, allows for robust, compliant locomotion over unperceived obstacles. We evaluate the performance of our controller by testing it on the LittleDog quadruped robot, over a wide variety of rough terrains of varying difficulty levels. The terrain that the robot was tested on includes rocks, logs, steps, barriers, and gaps, with obstacle sizes up to the leg length of the robot. We demonstrate the generalization ability of this controller by presenting results from testing performed by an independent external test team on terrain that has never been shown to us.

am

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Teleoperated 3-D force feedback from the nanoscale with an atomic force microscope

Onal, C. D., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on nanotechnology, 9(1):46-54, IEEE, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Roll and pitch motion analysis of a biologically inspired quadruped water runner robot

Park, H. S., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 29(10):1281-1297, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2010 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microstructured elastomeric surfaces with reversible adhesion and examples of their use in deterministic assembly by transfer printing

Kim, Seok, Wu, Jian, Carlson, Andrew, Jin, Sung Hun, Kovalsky, Anton, Glass, Paul, Liu, Zhuangjian, Ahmed, Numair, Elgan, Steven L, Chen, Weiqiu, others

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(40):17095-17100, National Acad Sciences, 2010 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Tankbot: A palm-size, tank-like climbing robot using soft elastomer adhesive treads

Unver, O., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 29(14):1761-1777, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2010 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Note: Aligned deposition and modal characterization of micron and submicron poly (methyl methacyrlate) fiber cantilevers

Nain, A. S., Filiz, S., Burak Ozdoganlar, O., Sitti, M., Amon, C.

Review of Scientific Instruments, 81(1):016102, AIP, 2010 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enhanced adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide elastomers via viscoelasticity tuning

Chung, H., Glass, P., Pothen, J. M., Sitti, M., Washburn, N. R.

Biomacromolecules, 12(2):342-347, American Chemical Society, 2010 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2009


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Magnetic mobile micro-robots

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

7eme Journees Nationales de la Recherche en Robotique, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

2009


[BibTex]


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Gecko-Inspired Directional and Controllable Adhesion

Murphy, M. P., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Small, 5(2):170-175, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2009 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Multiple magnetic microrobot control using electrostatic anchoring

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 94(16):164108, AIP, 2009 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Wet self-cleaning of biologically inspired elastomer mushroom shaped microfibrillar adhesives

Kim, S., Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(13):7196-7199, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robot ceiling climbers harness new tricks

Marks, Paul

New Scientist, 202(2705):18-19, Reed Business Information, 2009 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Biologically-Inspired Patterned and Coated Adhesives for Medical Devices

Glass, P, Chung, H, Lee, C, Tworkoski, E, Washburn, NR, Sitti, M

Journal of Medical Devices, 3(2):027537, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2009 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Modeling and experimental characterization of an untethered magnetic micro-robot

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 28(8):1077-1094, Sage Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Towards automated nanoassembly with the atomic force microscope: A versatile drift compensation procedure

Krohs, F., Onal, C., Sitti, M., Fatikow, S.

Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, 131(6):061106, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Valero-Cuevas, F., Hoffmann, H., Kurse, M. U., Kutch, J. J., Theodorou, E. A.

IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering – (All authors have equally contributed), (2):110?135, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Computational models of the neuromuscular system hold the potential to allow us to reach a deeper understanding of neuromuscular function and clinical rehabilitation by complementing experimentation. By serving as a means to distill and explore specific hypotheses, computational models emerge from prior experimental data and motivate future experimental work. Here we review computational tools used to understand neuromuscular function including musculoskeletal modeling, machine learning, control theory, and statistical model analysis. We conclude that these tools, when used in combination, have the potential to further our understanding of neuromuscular function by serving as a rigorous means to test scientific hypotheses in ways that complement and leverage experimental data.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Bayesian Methods for Autonomous Learning Systems (Phd Thesis)

Ting, J.

Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2009, clmc (phdthesis)

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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On-line learning and modulation of periodic movements with nonlinear dynamical systems

Gams, A., Ijspeert, A., Schaal, S., Lenarčič, J.

Autonomous Robots, 27(1):3-23, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Abstract  The paper presents a two-layered system for (1) learning and encoding a periodic signal without any knowledge on its frequency and waveform, and (2) modulating the learned periodic trajectory in response to external events. The system is used to learn periodic tasks on a humanoid HOAP-2 robot. The first layer of the system is a dynamical system responsible for extracting the fundamental frequency of the input signal, based on adaptive frequency oscillators. The second layer is a dynamical system responsible for learning of the waveform based on a built-in learning algorithm. By combining the two dynamical systems into one system we can rapidly teach new trajectories to robots without any knowledge of the frequency of the demonstration signal. The system extracts and learns only one period of the demonstration signal. Furthermore, the trajectories are robust to perturbations and can be modulated to cope with a dynamic environment. The system is computationally inexpensive, works on-line for any periodic signal, requires no additional signal processing to determine the frequency of the input signal and can be applied in parallel to multiple dimensions. Additionally, it can adapt to changes in frequency and shape, e.g. to non-stationary signals, such as hand-generated signals and human demonstrations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Local dimensionality reduction for non-parametric regression

Hoffman, H., Schaal, S., Vijayakumar, S.

Neural Processing Letters, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Locally-weighted regression is a computationally-efficient technique for non-linear regression. However, for high-dimensional data, this technique becomes numerically brittle and computationally too expensive if many local models need to be maintained simultaneously. Thus, local linear dimensionality reduction combined with locally-weighted regression seems to be a promising solution. In this context, we review linear dimensionality-reduction methods, compare their performance on nonparametric locally-linear regression, and discuss their ability to extend to incremental learning. The considered methods belong to the following three groups: (1) reducing dimensionality only on the input data, (2) modeling the joint input-output data distribution, and (3) optimizing the correlation between projection directions and output data. Group 1 contains principal component regression (PCR); group 2 contains principal component analysis (PCA) in joint input and output space, factor analysis, and probabilistic PCA; and group 3 contains reduced rank regression (RRR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression. Among the tested methods, only group 3 managed to achieve robust performance even for a non-optimal number of components (factors or projection directions). In contrast, group 1 and 2 failed for fewer components since these methods rely on the correct estimate of the true intrinsic dimensionality. In group 3, PLS is the only method for which a computationally-efficient incremental implementation exists. Thus, PLS appears to be ideally suited as a building block for a locally-weighted regressor in which projection directions are incrementally added on the fly.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Kim, S., Sitti, M.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(4):849-855, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Miniature devices: Voyage of the microrobots

Sitti, M.

Nature, 458(7242):1121-1122, Nature Publishing Group, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dry spinning based spinneret based tunable engineered parameters (STEP) technique for controlled and aligned deposition of polymeric nanofibers

Nain, A. S., Sitti, M., Jacobson, A., Kowalewski, T., Amon, C.

Macromolecular rapid communications, 30(16):1406-1412, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]