Header logo is


2007


no image
Learning static Gestalt laws through dynamic experience

Ostrovsky, Y., Wulff, J., Sinha, P.

Journal of Vision, 7(9):315-315, ARVO, June 2007 (article)

Abstract
The Gestalt laws (Wertheimer 1923) are widely regarded as the rules that help us parse the world into objects. However, it is unclear as to how these laws are acquired by an infant's visual system. Classically, these “laws” have been presumed to be innate (Kellman and Spelke 1983). But, more recent work in infant development, showing the protracted time-course over which these grouping principles emerge (e.g., Johnson and Aslin 1995; Craton 1996), suggests that visual experience might play a role in their genesis. Specifically, our studies of patients with late-onset vision (Project Prakash; VSS 2006) and evidence from infant development both point to an early role of common motion cues for object grouping. Here we explore the possibility that the privileged status of motion in the developmental timeline is not happenstance, but rather serves to bootstrap the learning of static Gestalt cues. Our approach involves computational analyses of real-world motion sequences to investigate whether primitive optic flow information is correlated with static figural cues that could eventually come to serve as proxies for grouping in the form of Gestalt principles. We calculated local optic flow maps and then examined how similarity of motion across image patches co-varied with similarity of certain figural properties in static frames. Results indicate that patches with similar motion are much more likely to have similar luminance, color, and orientation as compared to patches with dissimilar motion vectors. This regularity suggests that, in principle, common motion extracted from dynamic visual experience can provide enough information to bootstrap region grouping based on luminance and color and contour continuation mechanisms in static scenes. These observations, coupled with the cited experimental studies, lend credence to the hypothesis that static Gestalt laws might be learned through a bootstrapping process based on early dynamic experience.

ps

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2007


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl pedestal
Neuromotor prosthesis development

Donoghue, J., Hochberg, L., Nurmikko, A., Black, M., Simeral, J., Friehs, G.

Medicine & Health Rhode Island, 90(1):12-15, January 2007 (article)

Abstract
Article describes a neuromotor prosthesis (NMP), in development at Brown University, that records human brain signals, decodes them, and transforms them into movement commands. An NMP is described as a system consisting of a neural interface, a decoding system, and a user interface, also called an effector; a closed-loop system would be completed by a feedback signal from the effector to the brain. The interface is based on neural spiking, a source of information-rich, rapid, complex control signals from the nervous system. The NMP described, named BrainGate, consists of a match-head sized platform with 100 thread-thin electrodes implanted just into the surface of the motor cortex where commands to move the hand emanate. Neural signals are decoded by a rack of computers that displays the resultant output as the motion of a cursor on a computer monitor. While computer cursor motion represents a form of virtual device control, this same command signal could be routed to a device to command motion of paralyzed muscles or the actions of prosthetic limbs. The researchers’ overall goal is the development of a fully implantable, wireless multi-neuron sensor for broad research, neural prosthetic, and human neurodiagnostic applications.

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Bacterial flagella-based propulsion and on/off motion control of microscale objects

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 90(2):023902, AIP, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Friction of partially embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofibers inside elastomers

Aksak, B., Sitti, M., Cassell, A., Li, J., Meyyappan, M., Callen, P.

Applied Physics Letters, 91(6):061906, AIP, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Enhanced friction of elastomer microfiber adhesives with spatulate tips

Kim, S., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 91(22):221913, AIP, 2007 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
The new robotics - towards human-centered machines

Schaal, S.

HFSP Journal Frontiers of Interdisciplinary Research in the Life Sciences, 1(2):115-126, 2007, clmc (article)

Abstract
Research in robotics has moved away from its primary focus on industrial applications. The New Robotics is a vision that has been developed in past years by our own university and many other national and international research instiutions and addresses how increasingly more human-like robots can live among us and take over tasks where our current society has shortcomings. Elder care, physical therapy, child education, search and rescue, and general assistance in daily life situations are some of the examples that will benefit from the New Robotics in the near future. With these goals in mind, research for the New Robotics has to embrace a broad interdisciplinary approach, ranging from traditional mathematical issues of robotics to novel issues in psychology, neuroscience, and ethics. This paper outlines some of the important research problems that will need to be resolved to make the New Robotics a reality.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Thumb xl ijcvflow2
On the spatial statistics of optical flow

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

International Journal of Computer Vision, 74(1):33-50, 2007 (article)

Abstract
We present an analysis of the spatial and temporal statistics of "natural" optical flow fields and a novel flow algorithm that exploits their spatial statistics. Training flow fields are constructed using range images of natural scenes and 3D camera motions recovered from hand-held and car-mounted video sequences. A detailed analysis of optical flow statistics in natural scenes is presented and machine learning methods are developed to learn a Markov random field model of optical flow. The prior probability of a flow field is formulated as a Field-of-Experts model that captures the spatial statistics in overlapping patches and is trained using contrastive divergence. This new optical flow prior is compared with previous robust priors and is incorporated into a recent, accurate algorithm for dense optical flow computation. Experiments with natural and synthetic sequences illustrate how the learned optical flow prior quantitatively improves flow accuracy and how it captures the rich spatial structure found in natural scene motion.

ps

pdf preprint pdf from publisher [BibTex]

pdf preprint pdf from publisher [BibTex]


no image
Microscale and nanoscale robotics systems [grand challenges of robotics]

Sitti, M.

IEEE Robotics \& Automation Magazine, 14(1):53-60, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A new biomimetic adhesive for therapeutic capsule endoscope applications in the gastrointestinal tract

Glass, P., Sitti, M., Appasamy, R.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 65(5):AB91, Mosby, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Visual servoing-based autonomous 2-D manipulation of microparticles using a nanoprobe

Onal, C. D., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on control systems technology, 15(5):842-852, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl arrayhd
Assistive technology and robotic control using MI ensemble-based neural interface systems in humans with tetraplegia

Donoghue, J. P., Nurmikko, A., Black, M. J., Hochberg, L.

Journal of Physiology, Special Issue on Brain Computer Interfaces, 579, pages: 603-611, 2007 (article)

Abstract
This review describes the rationale, early stage development, and initial human application of neural interface systems (NISs) for humans with paralysis. NISs are emerging medical devices designed to allowpersonswith paralysis to operate assistive technologies or to reanimatemuscles based upon a command signal that is obtained directly fromthe brain. Such systems require the development of sensors to detect brain signals, decoders to transformneural activity signals into a useful command, and an interface for the user.We review initial pilot trial results of an NIS that is based on an intracortical microelectrode sensor that derives control signals from the motor cortex.We review recent findings showing, first, that neurons engaged by movement intentions persist in motor cortex years after injury or disease to the motor system, and second, that signals derived from motor cortex can be used by persons with paralysis to operate a range of devices. We suggest that, with further development, this form of NIS holds promise as a useful new neurotechnology for those with limited motor function or communication.We also discuss the additional potential for neural sensors to be used in the diagnosis and management of various neurological conditions and as a new way to learn about human brain function.

ps

pdf preprint pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]

pdf preprint pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]


no image
Adhesion of biologically inspired vertical and angled polymer microfiber arrays

Aksak, B., Murphy, M. P., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 23(6):3322-3332, ACS Publications, 2007 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Waalbot: An agile small-scale wall-climbing robot utilizing dry elastomer adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Sitti, M.

IEEE/ASME transactions on Mechatronics, 12(3):330-338, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Subfeature patterning of organic and inorganic materials using robotic assembly

Tafazzoli, A., Cheng, C., Pawashe, C., Sabo, E. K., Trofin, L., Sitti, M., LeDuc, P. R.

Journal of materials research, 22(06):1601-1608, Cambridge University Press, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Effect of backing layer thickness on adhesion of single-level elastomer fiber arrays

Kim, S., Sitti, M., Hui, C., Long, R., Jagota, A.

Applied Physics Letters, 91(16):161905, AIP, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Adhesion and anisotropic friction enhancements of angled heterogeneous micro-fiber arrays with spherical and spatula tips

Murphy, M. P., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, 21(12-13):1281-1296, Taylor & Francis Group, 2007 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Surface-tension-driven biologically inspired water strider robots: Theory and experiments

Song, Y. S., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on robotics, 23(3):578-589, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2006


no image
An ultrasonic standing-wave-actuated nano-positioning walking robot: piezoelectric-metal composite beam modeling

Son, K. J., Kartik, V., Wickert, J. A., Sitti, M.

Journal of vibration and control, 12(12):1293-1309, Sage Publications, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

2006


[BibTex]


no image
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS

VOLZ, RICHARD A, TARN, TJ, MACIEJEWSKI, ANTHONY A, LEE, SUKHAN, BICCHI, ANTONIO, DE LUCA, ALESSANDRO, LUH, PETER B, TAYLOR, RUSSELL H, BEKEY, GEORGE A, ARAI, HIROHIKO, others

2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Design methodology for biomimetic propulsion of miniature swimming robots

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

Trans.-ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems Measurement and Control, 128(1):36, ASME, 2006 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Augmented reality user interface for an atomic force microscope-based nanorobotic system

Vogl, W., Ma, B. K., Sitti, M.

IEEE transactions on nanotechnology, 5(4):397-406, IEEE, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Friction enhancement via micro-patterned wet elastomer adhesives on small intestinal surfaces

Kwon, J., Cheung, E., Park, S., Sitti, M.

Biomedical Materials, 1(4):216, IOP Publishing, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Compliant and low-cost humidity nanosensors using nanoporous polymer membranes

Yang, B., Aksak, B., Lin, Q., Sitti, M.

Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 114(1):254-262, Elsevier, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Task-based and stable telenanomanipulation in a nanoscale virtual environment

Kim, S., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on automation science and engineering, 3(3):240-247, IEEE, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Drawing suspended polymer micro-/nanofibers using glass micropipettes

Nain, A. S., Wong, J. C., Amon, C., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 89(18):183105, AIP, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl neuralcomp
Bayesian population decoding of motor cortical activity using a Kalman filter

Wu, W., Gao, Y., Bienenstock, E., Donoghue, J. P., Black, M. J.

Neural Computation, 18(1):80-118, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Effective neural motor prostheses require a method for decoding neural activity representing desired movement. In particular, the accurate reconstruction of a continuous motion signal is necessary for the control of devices such as computer cursors, robots, or a patient's own paralyzed limbs. For such applications, we developed a real-time system that uses Bayesian inference techniques to estimate hand motion from the firing rates of multiple neurons. In this study, we used recordings that were previously made in the arm area of primary motor cortex in awake behaving monkeys using a chronically implanted multielectrode microarray. Bayesian inference involves computing the posterior probability of the hand motion conditioned on a sequence of observed firing rates; this is formulated in terms of the product of a likelihood and a prior. The likelihood term models the probability of firing rates given a particular hand motion. We found that a linear gaussian model could be used to approximate this likelihood and could be readily learned from a small amount of training data. The prior term defines a probabilistic model of hand kinematics and was also taken to be a linear gaussian model. Decoding was performed using a Kalman filter, which gives an efficient recursive method for Bayesian inference when the likelihood and prior are linear and gaussian. In off-line experiments, the Kalman filter reconstructions of hand trajectory were more accurate than previously reported results. The resulting decoding algorithm provides a principled probabilistic model of motor-cortical coding, decodes hand motion in real time, provides an estimate of uncertainty, and is straightforward to implement. Additionally the formulation unifies and extends previous models of neural coding while providing insights into the motor-cortical code.

ps

pdf preprint pdf from publisher abstract [BibTex]

pdf preprint pdf from publisher abstract [BibTex]


no image
Biologically inspired polymer microfibers with spatulate tips as repeatable fibrillar adhesives

Kim, S., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 89(26):261911-261911, AIP, 2006 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Two-dimensional vision-based autonomous microparticle manipulation using a nanoprobe

Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

Journal of Micromechatronics, 3(3):285-306, Brill, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A biomimetic climbing robot based on the gecko

Menon, C., Sitti, M.

Journal of Bionic Engineering, 3(3):115-125, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Proximal probes based nanorobotic drawing of polymer micro/nanofibers

Nain, A. S., Amon, C., Sitti, M.

IEEE transactions on nanotechnology, 5(5):499-510, IEEE, 2006 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]