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2012


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Coupled Action Recognition and Pose Estimation from Multiple Views

Yao, A., Gall, J., van Gool, L.

International Journal of Computer Vision, 100(1):16-37, October 2012 (article)

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publisher's site code pdf Project Page Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

2012


publisher's site code pdf Project Page Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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DRAPE: DRessing Any PErson

Guan, P., Reiss, L., Hirshberg, D., Weiss, A., Black, M. J.

ACM Trans. on Graphics (Proc. SIGGRAPH), 31(4):35:1-35:10, July 2012 (article)

Abstract
We describe a complete system for animating realistic clothing on synthetic bodies of any shape and pose without manual intervention. The key component of the method is a model of clothing called DRAPE (DRessing Any PErson) that is learned from a physics-based simulation of clothing on bodies of different shapes and poses. The DRAPE model has the desirable property of "factoring" clothing deformations due to body shape from those due to pose variation. This factorization provides an approximation to the physical clothing deformation and greatly simplifies clothing synthesis. Given a parameterized model of the human body with known shape and pose parameters, we describe an algorithm that dresses the body with a garment that is customized to fit and possesses realistic wrinkles. DRAPE can be used to dress static bodies or animated sequences with a learned model of the cloth dynamics. Since the method is fully automated, it is appropriate for dressing large numbers of virtual characters of varying shape. The method is significantly more efficient than physical simulation.

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YouTube pdf talk Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

YouTube pdf talk Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Entropy Search for Information-Efficient Global Optimization

Hennig, P., Schuler, C.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 13, pages: 1809-1837, -, June 2012 (article)

Abstract
Contemporary global optimization algorithms are based on local measures of utility, rather than a probability measure over location and value of the optimum. They thus attempt to collect low function values, not to learn about the optimum. The reason for the absence of probabilistic global optimizers is that the corresponding inference problem is intractable in several ways. This paper develops desiderata for probabilistic optimization algorithms, then presents a concrete algorithm which addresses each of the computational intractabilities with a sequence of approximations and explicitly adresses the decision problem of maximizing information gain from each evaluation.

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PDF Web Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Web Project Page [BibTex]


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Visual Orientation and Directional Selectivity Through Thalamic Synchrony

Stanley, G., Jin, J., Wang, Y., Desbordes, G., Wang, Q., Black, M., Alonso, J.

Journal of Neuroscience, 32(26):9073-9088, June 2012 (article)

Abstract
Thalamic neurons respond to visual scenes by generating synchronous spike trains on the timescale of 10–20 ms that are very effective at driving cortical targets. Here we demonstrate that this synchronous activity contains unexpectedly rich information about fundamental properties of visual stimuli. We report that the occurrence of synchronous firing of cat thalamic cells with highly overlapping receptive fields is strongly sensitive to the orientation and the direction of motion of the visual stimulus. We show that this stimulus selectivity is robust, remaining relatively unchanged under different contrasts and temporal frequencies (stimulus velocities). A computational analysis based on an integrate-and-fire model of the direct thalamic input to a layer 4 cortical cell reveals a strong correlation between the degree of thalamic synchrony and the nonlinear relationship between cortical membrane potential and the resultant firing rate. Together, these findings suggest a novel population code in the synchronous firing of neurons in the early visual pathway that could serve as the substrate for establishing cortical representations of the visual scene.

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preprint publisher's site Project Page [BibTex]

preprint publisher's site Project Page [BibTex]


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From Dynamic Movement Primitives to Associative Skill Memories

Pastor, P., Kalakrishnan, M., Meier, F., Stulp, F., Buchli, J., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Two-dimensional autonomous microparticle manipulation strategies for magnetic microrobots in fluidic environments

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Diller, E., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 28(2):467-477, IEEE, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Three-dimensional microfiber devices that mimic physiological environments to probe cell mechanics and signaling

Ruder, W. C., Pratt, E. D., Bakhru, S., Sitti, M., Zappe, S., Cheng, C., Antaki, J. F., LeDuc, P. R.

Lab on a Chip, 12(10):1775-1779, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Active visual search in unknown environments using uncertain semantics

Aydemir, Alper, Pronobis, Andrzej, Jensfelt, Patric, Sj, Kristoffer, Aydemir, Alper, Jensfelt, Patric, Aydemir, A, Jensfelt, P, Aydemir, A, Jensfelt, P, others

Transactions, 1, pages: 2329-2335, IEEE, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Modelling of conductive atomic force microscope probes for scanning tunnelling microscope operation

Ozcan, O, Sitti, M

IET Micro \& Nano Letters, 7(4):329-333, IET, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Shape memory polymer-based flexure stiffness control in a miniature flapping-wing robot

Hines, L., Arabagi, V., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 28(4):987-990, IEEE, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Micro-manipulation using rotational fluid flows induced by remote magnetic micro-manipulators

Ye, Z., Diller, E., Sitti, M.

Journal of Applied Physics, 112(6):064912, AIP, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Remotely addressable magnetic composite micropumps

Diller, E., Miyashita, S., Sitti, M.

Rsc Advances, 2(9):3850-3856, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Model-free reinforcement learning of impedance control in stochastic environments

Stulp, Freek, Buchli, Jonas, Ellmer, Alice, Mistry, Michael, Theodorou, Evangelos A., Schaal, S.

Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on, 4(4):330-341, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Shape-Programmable Soft Capsule Robots for Semi-Implantable Drug Delivery

Yim, S., Sitti, M.

Mechatronics, IEEE/ASME Transactions on, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Control of multiple heterogeneous magnetic microrobots in two dimensions on nonspecialized surfaces

Diller, E., Floyd, S., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 28(1):172-182, IEEE, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Gecko-Inspired Controllable Adhesive Structures Applied to Micromanipulation

Mengüç, Y., Yang, S. Y., Kim, S., Rogers, J. A., Sitti, M.

Advanced Functional Materials, 22(6):1245-1245, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Elastomer surfaces with directionally dependent adhesion strength and their use in transfer printing with continuous roll-to-roll applications

Yang, S. Y., Carlson, A., Cheng, H., Yu, Q., Ahmed, N., Wu, J., Kim, S., Sitti, M., Ferreira, P. M., Huang, Y., others,

Advanced Materials, 24(16):2117-2122, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Effect of retraction speed on adhesion of elastomer fibrillar structures

Abusomwan, U., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 101(21):211907, AIP, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning with Sequences of Motion Primitives for Robust Manipulation

Stulp, F., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Impact and Surface Tension in Water: a Study of Landing Bodies

Shih, B., Laham, L., Lee, K. J., Krasnoff, N., Diller, E., Sitti, M.

Bio-inspired Robotics Final Project, Carnegie Mellon University, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design and rolling locomotion of a magnetically actuated soft capsule endoscope

Yim, S., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 28(1):183-194, IEEE, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Design and manufacturing of a controllable miniature flapping wing robotic platform

Arabagi, V., Hines, L., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 31(6):785-800, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Chemotactic steering of bacteria propelled microbeads

Kim, D., Liu, A., Diller, E., Sitti, M.

Biomedical microdevices, 14(6):1009-1017, Springer US, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2001


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Synchronized robot drumming by neural oscillator

Kotosaka, S., Schaal, S.

Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan, 19(1):116-123, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Sensory-motor integration is one of the key issues in robotics. In this paper, we propose an approach to rhythmic arm movement control that is synchronized with an external signal based on exploiting a simple neural oscillator network. Trajectory generation by the neural oscillator is a biologically inspired method that can allow us to generate a smooth and continuous trajectory. The parameter tuning of the oscillators is used to generate a synchronized movement with wide intervals. We adopted the method for the drumming task as an example task. By using this method, the robot can realize synchronized drumming with wide drumming intervals in real time. The paper also shows the experimental results of drumming by a humanoid robot.

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[BibTex]

2001


[BibTex]


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Origins and violations of the 2/3 power law in rhythmic 3D movements

Schaal, S., Sternad, D.

Experimental Brain Research, 136, pages: 60-72, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
The 2/3 power law, the nonlinear relationship between tangential velocity and radius of curvature of the endeffector trajectory, has been suggested as a fundamental constraint of the central nervous system in the formation of rhythmic endpoint trajectories. However, studies on the 2/3 power law have largely been confined to planar drawing patterns of relatively small size. With the hypothesis that this strategy overlooks nonlinear effects that are constitutive in movement generation, the present experiments tested the validity of the power law in elliptical patterns which were not confined to a planar surface and which were performed by the unconstrained 7-DOF arm with significant variations in pattern size and workspace orientation. Data were recorded from five human subjects where the seven joint angles and the endpoint trajectories were analyzed. Additionally, an anthropomorphic 7-DOF robot arm served as a "control subject" whose endpoint trajectories were generated on the basis of the human joint angle data, modeled as simple harmonic oscillations. Analyses of the endpoint trajectories demonstrate that the power law is systematically violated with increasing pattern size, in both exponent and the goodness of fit. The origins of these violations can be explained analytically based on smooth rhythmic trajectory formation and the kinematic structure of the human arm. We conclude that in unconstrained rhythmic movements, the power law seems to be a by-product of a movement system that favors smooth trajectories, and that it is unlikely to serve as a primary movement generating principle. Our data rather suggests that subjects employed smooth oscillatory pattern generators in joint space to realize the required movement patterns.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Graph-matching vs. entropy-based methods for object detection
Neural Networks, 14(3):345-354, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Labeled Graph Matching (LGM) has been shown successful in numerous ob-ject vision tasks. This method is the basis for arguably the best face recognition system in the world. We present an algorithm for visual pattern recognition that is an extension of LGM ("LGM+"). We compare the performance of LGM and LGM+ algorithms with a state of the art statistical method based on Mutual Information Maximization (MIM). We present an adaptation of the MIM method for multi-dimensional Gabor wavelet features. The three pattern recognition methods were evaluated on an object detection task, using a set of stimuli on which none of the methods had been tested previously. The results indicate that while the performance of the MIM method operating upon Gabor wavelets is superior to the same method operating on pixels and to LGM, it is surpassed by LGM+. LGM+ offers a significant improvement in performance over LGM without losing LGMâ??s virtues of simplicity, biological plausibility, and a computational cost that is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the MIM algorithm. 

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Biomimetic gaze stabilization based on feedback-error learning with nonparametric regression networks

Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

Neural Networks, 14(2):201-216, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Oculomotor control in a humanoid robot faces similar problems as biological oculomotor systems, i.e. the stabilization of gaze in face of unknown perturbations of the body, selective attention, stereo vision, and dealing with large information processing delays. Given the nonlinearities of the geometry of binocular vision as well as the possible nonlinearities of the oculomotor plant, it is desirable to accomplish accurate control of these behaviors through learning approaches. This paper develops a learning control system for the phylogenetically oldest behaviors of oculomotor control, the stabilization reflexes of gaze. In a step-wise procedure, we demonstrate how control theoretic reasonable choices of control components result in an oculomotor control system that resembles the known functional anatomy of the primate oculomotor system. The core of the learning system is derived from the biologically inspired principle of feedback-error learning combined with a state-of-the-art non-parametric statistical learning network. With this circuitry, we demonstrate that our humanoid robot is able to acquire high performance visual stabilization reflexes after about 40 s of learning despite significant nonlinearities and processing delays in the system.

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link (url) [BibTex]


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Fast learning of biomimetic oculomotor control with nonparametric regression networks (in Japanese)

Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan, 19(4):468-479, 2001, clmc (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bouncing a ball: Tuning into dynamic stability

Sternad, D., Duarte, M., Katsumata, H., Schaal, S.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(5):1163-1184, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Rhythmically bouncing a ball with a racket was investigated and modeled with a nonlinear map. Model analyses provided a variable defining a dynamically stable solution that obviates computationally expensive corrections. Three experiments evaluated whether dynamic stability is optimized and what perceptual support is necessary for stable behavior. Two hypotheses were tested: (a) Performance is stable if racket acceleration is negative at impact, and (b) variability is lowest at an impact acceleration between -4 and -1 m/s2. In Experiment 1 participants performed the task, eyes open or closed, bouncing a ball confined to a 1-dimensional trajectory. Experiment 2 eliminated constraints on racket and ball trajectory. Experiment 3 excluded visual or haptic information. Movements were performed with negative racket accelerations in the range of highest stability. Performance with eyes closed was more variable, leaving acceleration unaffected. With haptic information, performance was more stable than with visual information alone.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Wing transmission for a micromechanical flying insect

Yan, J., Avadhanula, S., Birch, J., Dickinson, M., Sitti, M., Su, T., Fearing, R.

Journal of Micromechatronics, 1(3):221-237, Brill, 2001 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Biomimetic oculomotor control

Shibata, T., Vijayakumar, S., Conradt, J., Schaal, S.

Adaptive Behavior, 9(3/4):189-207, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Oculomotor control in a humanoid robot faces similar problems as biological oculomotor systems, i.e., capturing targets accurately on a very narrow fovea, dealing with large delays in the control system, the stabilization of gaze in face of unknown perturbations of the body, selective attention, and the complexity of stereo vision. In this paper, we suggest control circuits to realize three of the most basic oculomotor behaviors and their integration - the vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflex (VOR-OKR) for gaze stabilization, smooth pursuit for tracking moving objects, and saccades for overt visual attention. Each of these behaviors and the mechanism for their integration was derived with inspiration from computational theories as well as behavioral and physiological data in neuroscience. Our implementations on a humanoid robot demonstrate good performance of the oculomotor behaviors, which proves to be a viable strategy to explore novel control mechanisms for humanoid robotics. Conversely, insights gained from our models have been able to directly influence views and provide new directions for computational neuroscience research.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]