Header logo is


2002


Chirality-specific nonlinear spectroscopies in isotropic media
Chirality-specific nonlinear spectroscopies in isotropic media

Fischer, P., Albrecht, A.

BULLETIN OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN, 75(5):1119-1124, 2002, 10th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS 2001), OKAZZAKI, JAPAN, MAY 21-25, 2001 (article)

Abstract
Sum or difference frequency generation (SFG or DFG) in isotropic media is in the electric-dipole approximation only symmetry allowed for optically active systems. The hyperpolarizability giving rise to these three-wave mixing processes features only one isotropic component. It factorizes into two terms, an energy (denominator) factor and a triple product of transition moments. These forbid degenerate SFG, i.e., second harmonic generation, as well as the existence of the linear electrooptic effect (Pockels effect) in isotropic media. This second order response also has no static limit, which leads to particularly strong resonance phenomena that are qualitatively different from those usually seen in the ubiquitous even-wave mixing spectroscopies. In particular, the participation of two (not the usual one) excited states is essential to achieve dramatic resonance enhancement, We report our first efforts to see such resonantly enhanced chirality specific SFG.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

2002


DOI [BibTex]


The chiral specificity of sum-frequency generation in solutions
The chiral specificity of sum-frequency generation in solutions

Fischer, P., Beckwitt, K., Wise, F., Albrecht, A.

CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS, 352(5-6):463-468, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Sum-frequency generation in isotropic media is in the electric-dipole approximation the only symmetry allowed for chiral systems. We demonstrate that the sum-frequency intensity from an optically active liquid depends quadratically on the difference in concentration of the two enantiomers. The dominant contribution to the signal is found to be due to the chirality specific electric-dipolar three-wave mixing nonlinearity. Selecting the polarization of all fields allows the chiral electric-dipolar contributions to the bulk sum-frequency signal to be discerned from any achiral magnetic-dipolar and electric-quadrupolar contributions. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


On optical rectification in isotropic media
On optical rectification in isotropic media

Fischer, P., Albrecht, A.

LASER PHYSICS, 12(8):1177-1181, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Coherent nonlinear optical processes at second-order are only electric-dipole allowed in isotropic media that are optically active. Sum-frequency generation in chiral liquids has recently been observed, and difference-frequency and optical rectification have been predicted to exist in isotropic chiral media. Both Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory and the density matrix approach are used to discuss the quantum-chemical basis of optical rectification in optically active liquids. For pinene we compute the corresponding orientationally averaged hyperpolarizability, and estimate the light-induced dc electric polarization and the consequent voltage across a measuring capacitor it may give rise to near resonance.

pf

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2001


Isotropic second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities
Isotropic second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities

Fischer, P., Buckingham, A., Albrecht, A.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 64(5), 2001 (article)

Abstract
The second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, in the electric dipole approximation, is only nonvanishing for materials that are noncentrosymmetric. Should the medium be isotropic, then only a chiral system. such as an optically active liquid, satisfies this symmetry requirement. We derive the quantum-mechanical form of the isotropic component of the sum- and difference-frequency susceptibility and discuss its unusual spectral properties. We show that any coherent second-order nonlinear optical process in a system of randomly oriented molecules requires the medium to be chiral. and the incident frequencies to be different and nonzero. Furthermore, a minimum of two nondegenerate excited molecular states are needed for the isotropic part of the susceptibility to be nonvanishing. The rotationally invariant susceptibility is zero in the static field limit and shows exceptionally sensitive resonance and dephasing effects that are particular to chiral centers.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

2001


DOI [BibTex]


Reply to ``Comment on `Phenomenological damping in optical response tensors'{''}
Reply to “Comment on ‘Phenomenological damping in optical response tensors’”

Buckingham, A., Fischer, P.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 63(4), 2001 (article)

Abstract
We show that damping factors must not be incorporated in the perturbation of the ground state by a static electric field. If they are included, as in the theory of Stedman et al. {[}preceding Comment. Phys. Rev. A 63, 047801 (2001)], then there would be an electric dipole in the y direction induced in a hydrogen atom in the M-s = + 1/2 state by a static electric field in the x direction. Such a dipole is excluded by symmetry.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

1994


A computational and evolutionary perspective on the role of representation in computer vision
A computational and evolutionary perspective on the role of representation in computer vision

Tarr, M. J., Black, M. J.

CVGIP: Image Understanding, 60(1):65-73, July 1994 (article)

Abstract
Recently, the assumed goal of computer vision, reconstructing a representation of the scene, has been critcized as unproductive and impractical. Critics have suggested that the reconstructive approach should be supplanted by a new purposive approach that emphasizes functionality and task driven perception at the cost of general vision. In response to these arguments, we claim that the recovery paradigm central to the reconstructive approach is viable, and, moreover, provides a promising framework for understanding and modeling general purpose vision in humans and machines. An examination of the goals of vision from an evolutionary perspective and a case study involving the recovery of optic flow support this hypothesis. In particular, while we acknowledge that there are instances where the purposive approach may be appropriate, these are insufficient for implementing the wide range of visual tasks exhibited by humans (the kind of flexible vision system presumed to be an end-goal of artificial intelligence). Furthermore, there are instances, such as recent work on the estimation of optic flow, where the recovery paradigm may yield useful and robust results. Thus, contrary to certain claims, the purposive approach does not obviate the need for recovery and reconstruction of flexible representations of the world.

ps

pdf [BibTex]

1994


pdf [BibTex]


Reconstruction and purpose
Reconstruction and purpose

Tarr, M. J., Black, M. J.

CVGIP: Image Understanding, 60(1):113-118, July 1994 (article)

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]