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2019


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Chemical Nanomotors at the Gram Scale Form a Dense Active Optorheological Medium

Choudhury, U., Singh, D. P., Qiu, T., Fischer, P.

Adv. Mat., (1807382), Febuary 2019 (article)

Abstract
The rheological properties of a colloidal suspension are a function of the concentration of the colloids and their interactions. While suspensions of passive colloids are well studied and have been shown to form crystals, gels, and glasses, examples of energy‐consuming “active” colloidal suspensions are still largely unexplored. Active suspensions of biological matter, such as motile bacteria or dense mixtures of active actin–motor–protein mixtures have, respectively, reveals superfluid‐like and gel‐like states. Attractive inanimate systems for active matter are chemically self‐propelled particles. It has so far been challenging to use these swimming particles at high enough densities to affect the bulk material properties of the suspension. Here, it is shown that light‐triggered asymmetric titanium dioxide that self‐propel, can be obtained in large quantities, and self‐organize to make a gram‐scale active medium. The suspension shows an activity‐dependent tenfold reversible change in its bulk viscosity.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Perceptual Effects of Inconsistency in Human Animations

Kenny, S., Mahmood, N., Honda, C., Black, M. J., Troje, N. F.

ACM Trans. Appl. Percept., 16(1):2:1-2:18, Febuary 2019 (article)

Abstract
The individual shape of the human body, including the geometry of its articulated structure and the distribution of weight over that structure, influences the kinematics of a person’s movements. How sensitive is the visual system to inconsistencies between shape and motion introduced by retargeting motion from one person onto the shape of another? We used optical motion capture to record five pairs of male performers with large differences in body weight, while they pushed, lifted, and threw objects. From these data, we estimated both the kinematics of the actions as well as the performer’s individual body shape. To obtain consistent and inconsistent stimuli, we created animated avatars by combining the shape and motion estimates from either a single performer or from different performers. Using these stimuli we conducted three experiments in an immersive virtual reality environment. First, a group of participants detected which of two stimuli was inconsistent. Performance was very low, and results were only marginally significant. Next, a second group of participants rated perceived attractiveness, eeriness, and humanness of consistent and inconsistent stimuli, but these judgements of animation characteristics were not affected by consistency of the stimuli. Finally, a third group of participants rated properties of the objects rather than of the performers. Here, we found strong influences of shape-motion inconsistency on perceived weight and thrown distance of objects. This suggests that the visual system relies on its knowledge of shape and motion and that these components are assimilated into an altered perception of the action outcome. We propose that the visual system attempts to resist inconsistent interpretations of human animations. Actions involving object manipulations present an opportunity for the visual system to reinterpret the introduced inconsistencies as a change in the dynamics of an object rather than as an unexpected combination of body shape and body motion.

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publisher pdf DOI [BibTex]

publisher pdf DOI [BibTex]


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First Observation of Optical Activity in Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering

Collins, J., Rusimova, K., Hooper, D., Jeong, H. H., Ohnoutek, L., Pradaux-Caggiano, F., Verbiest, T., Carbery, D., Fischer, P., Valev, V.

Phys. Rev. X, 9(011024), January 2019 (article)

Abstract
Chiral nano- or metamaterials and surfaces enable striking photonic properties, such as negative refractive index and superchiral light, driving promising applications in novel optical components, nanorobotics, and enhanced chiral molecular interactions with light. In characterizing chirality, although nonlinear chiroptical techniques are typically much more sensitive than their linear optical counterparts, separating true chirality from anisotropy is a major challenge. Here, we report the first observation of optical activity in second-harmonic hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS). We demonstrate the effect in a 3D isotropic suspension of Ag nanohelices in water. The effect is 5 orders of magnitude stronger than linear optical activity and is well pronounced above the multiphoton luminescence background. Because of its sensitivity, isotropic environment, and straightforward experimental geometry, HRS optical activity constitutes a fundamental experimental breakthrough in chiral photonics for media including nanomaterials, metamaterials, and chemical molecules.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl journal iav
Data-efficient Auto-tuning with Bayesian Optimization: An Industrial Control Study

Neumann-Brosig, M., Marco, A., Schwarzmann, D., Trimpe, S.

IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, 2019 (article) Accepted

Abstract
Bayesian optimization is proposed for automatic learning of optimal controller parameters from experimental data. A probabilistic description (a Gaussian process) is used to model the unknown function from controller parameters to a user-defined cost. The probabilistic model is updated with data, which is obtained by testing a set of parameters on the physical system and evaluating the cost. In order to learn fast, the Bayesian optimization algorithm selects the next parameters to evaluate in a systematic way, for example, by maximizing information gain about the optimum. The algorithm thus iteratively finds the globally optimal parameters with only few experiments. Taking throttle valve control as a representative industrial control example, the proposed auto-tuning method is shown to outperform manual calibration: it consistently achieves better performance with a low number of experiments. The proposed auto-tuning framework is flexible and can handle different control structures and objectives.

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arXiv (PDF) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

arXiv (PDF) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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How Does It Feel to Clap Hands with a Robot?

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

International Journal of Social Robotics, 2019 (article) Accepted

Abstract
Future robots may need lighthearted physical interaction capabilities to connect with people in meaningful ways. To begin exploring how users perceive playful human–robot hand-to-hand interaction, we conducted a study with 20 participants. Each user played simple hand-clapping games with the Rethink Robotics Baxter Research Robot during a 1-h-long session involving 24 randomly ordered conditions that varied in facial reactivity, physical reactivity, arm stiffness, and clapping tempo. Survey data and experiment recordings demonstrate that this interaction is viable: all users successfully completed the experiment and mentioned enjoying at least one game without prompting. Hand-clapping tempo was highly salient to users, and human-like robot errors were more widely accepted than mechanical errors. Furthermore, perceptions of Baxter varied in the following statistically significant ways: facial reactivity increased the robot’s perceived pleasantness and energeticness; physical reactivity decreased pleasantness, energeticness, and dominance; higher arm stiffness increased safety and decreased dominance; and faster tempo increased energeticness and increased dominance. These findings can motivate and guide roboticists who want to design social–physical human–robot interactions.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microrobotics and Microorganisms: Biohybrid Autonomous Cellular Robots

Alapan, Y., Yasa, O., Yigit, B., Yasa, I. C., Erkoc, P., Sitti, M.

Annual Review of Control, Robotics, and Autonomous Systems, 2019 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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X-ray Optics Fabrication Using Unorthodox Approaches

Sanli, U., Baluktsian, M., Ceylan, H., Sitti, M., Weigand, M., Schuetz, G., Keskinbora, K.

Bulletin of the American Physical Society, APS, 2019 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The near and far of a pair of magnetic capillary disks

Koens, L., Wang, W., Sitti, M., Lauga, E.

Soft Matter, in press, 2019 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Review of emerging concepts in nanotoxicology: opportunities and challenges for safer nanomaterial design

Singh, A. V., Laux, P., Luch, A., Sudrik, C., Wiehr, S., Wild, A., Santamauro, G., Bill, J., Sitti, M.

Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods, 2019 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Doing more with less: Meta-reasoning and meta-learning in humans and machines

Griffiths, T., Callaway, F., Chang, M., Grant, E., Krueger, P. M., Lieder, F.

Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 2019 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The Virtual Caliper: Rapid Creation of Metrically Accurate Avatars from 3D Measurements

Pujades, S., Mohler, B., Thaler, A., Tesch, J., Mahmood, N., Hesse, N., Bülthoff, H. H., Black, M. J.

IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2019 (article)

Abstract
Creating metrically accurate avatars is important for many applications such as virtual clothing try-on, ergonomics, medicine, immersive social media, telepresence, and gaming. Creating avatars that precisely represent a particular individual is challenging however, due to the need for expensive 3D scanners, privacy issues with photographs or videos, and difficulty in making accurate tailoring measurements. We overcome these challenges by creating “The Virtual Caliper”, which uses VR game controllers to make simple measurements. First, we establish what body measurements users can reliably make on their own body. We find several distance measurements to be good candidates and then verify that these are linearly related to 3D body shape as represented by the SMPL body model. The Virtual Caliper enables novice users to accurately measure themselves and create an avatar with their own body shape. We evaluate the metric accuracy relative to ground truth 3D body scan data, compare the method quantitatively to other avatar creation tools, and perform extensive perceptual studies. We also provide a software application to the community that enables novices to rapidly create avatars in fewer than five minutes. Not only is our approach more rapid than existing methods, it exports a metrically accurate 3D avatar model that is rigged and skinned.

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Early Access pdf [BibTex]

Early Access pdf [BibTex]


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Microfluidics Integrated Lithography‐Free Nanophotonic Biosensor for the Detection of Small Molecules

Sreekanth, K. V., Sreejith, S., Alapan, Y., Sitti, M., Lim, C. T., Singh, R.

Advanced Optical Materials, 2019 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Resource-aware IoT Control: Saving Communication through Predictive Triggering

Trimpe, S., Baumann, D.

IEEE Internet of Things Journal, 2019 (article) Accepted

Abstract
The Internet of Things (IoT) interconnects multiple physical devices in large-scale networks. When the 'things' coordinate decisions and act collectively on shared information, feedback is introduced between them. Multiple feedback loops are thus closed over a shared, general-purpose network. Traditional feedback control is unsuitable for design of IoT control because it relies on high-rate periodic communication and is ignorant of the shared network resource. Therefore, recent event-based estimation methods are applied herein for resource-aware IoT control allowing agents to decide online whether communication with other agents is needed, or not. While this can reduce network traffic significantly, a severe limitation of typical event-based approaches is the need for instantaneous triggering decisions that leave no time to reallocate freed resources (e.g., communication slots), which hence remain unused. To address this problem, novel predictive and self triggering protocols are proposed herein. From a unified Bayesian decision framework, two schemes are developed: self triggers that predict, at the current triggering instant, the next one; and predictive triggers that check at every time step, whether communication will be needed at a given prediction horizon. The suitability of these triggers for feedback control is demonstrated in hardware experiments on a cart-pole, and scalability is discussed with a multi-vehicle simulation.

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PDF arXiv DOI [BibTex]


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Electromechanical actuation of dielectric liquid crystal elastomers for soft robotics

Davidson, Z., Shahsavan, H., Guo, Y., Hines, L., Xia, Y., Yang, S., Sitti, M.

Bulletin of the American Physical Society, APS, 2019 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Comparison of theories of fast and ultrafast magnetization dynamics

Fähnle, M.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 469, pages: 28-29, NH, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2019 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2001


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Regularized principal manifolds

Smola, A., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 1, pages: 179-209, June 2001 (article)

Abstract
Many settings of unsupervised learning can be viewed as quantization problems - the minimization of the expected quantization error subject to some restrictions. This allows the use of tools such as regularization from the theory of (supervised) risk minimization for unsupervised learning. This setting turns out to be closely related to principal curves, the generative topographic map, and robust coding. We explore this connection in two ways: (1) we propose an algorithm for finding principal manifolds that can be regularized in a variety of ways; and (2) we derive uniform convergence bounds and hence bounds on the learning rates of the algorithm. In particular, we give bounds on the covering numbers which allows us to obtain nearly optimal learning rates for certain types of regularization operators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the approach.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

2001


PDF [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: II. Bootstrap-based confidence intervals and sampling

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1314-1329, 2001 (article)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: I. Fitting, sampling and goodness-of-fit

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1293-1313, 2001 (article)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer'sperformance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. This paper, together with its companion paper (Wichmann & Hill, 2001), describes an integrated approach to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing the goodness of fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function'sparameters and other estimates derived from them, for the purposes of hypothesis testing. The present paper deals with the first two topics, describing a constrained maximum-likelihood method of parameter estimation and developing several goodness-of-fit tests. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we deal with two specific difficulties that arise when fitting functions to psychophysical data. First, we note that human observers are prone to stimulus-independent errors (or lapses ). We show that failure to account for this can lead to serious biases in estimates of the psychometric function'sparameters and illustrate how the problem may be overcome. Second, we note that psychophysical data sets are usually rather small by the standards required by most of the commonly applied statistical tests. We demonstrate the potential errors of applying traditional X^2 methods to psychophysical data and advocate use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory. We have made available the software to implement our methods

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Markovian domain fingerprinting: statistical segmentation of protein sequences

Bejerano, G., Seldin, Y., Margalit, H., Tishby, N.

Bioinformatics, 17(10):927-934, 2001 (article)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Isotropic second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities

Fischer, P., Buckingham, A., Albrecht, A.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 64(5), 2001 (article)

Abstract
The second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, in the electric dipole approximation, is only nonvanishing for materials that are noncentrosymmetric. Should the medium be isotropic, then only a chiral system. such as an optically active liquid, satisfies this symmetry requirement. We derive the quantum-mechanical form of the isotropic component of the sum- and difference-frequency susceptibility and discuss its unusual spectral properties. We show that any coherent second-order nonlinear optical process in a system of randomly oriented molecules requires the medium to be chiral. and the incident frequencies to be different and nonzero. Furthermore, a minimum of two nondegenerate excited molecular states are needed for the isotropic part of the susceptibility to be nonvanishing. The rotationally invariant susceptibility is zero in the static field limit and shows exceptionally sensitive resonance and dephasing effects that are particular to chiral centers.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Reply to “Comment on ‘Phenomenological damping in optical response tensors’”

Buckingham, A., Fischer, P.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 63(4), 2001 (article)

Abstract
We show that damping factors must not be incorporated in the perturbation of the ground state by a static electric field. If they are included, as in the theory of Stedman et al. {[}preceding Comment. Phys. Rev. A 63, 047801 (2001)], then there would be an electric dipole in the y direction induced in a hydrogen atom in the M-s = + 1/2 state by a static electric field in the x direction. Such a dipole is excluded by symmetry.

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DOI [BibTex]


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The coercivity of the melt-spun Sm-Fe-Ga-C permanent magnets and the effect of additives (Nb, Cu and Zr)

Zhang, J. X., Kleinschroth, I., Goll, D., Cuevas, F., Kronmüller, H.

{Journal of Physics-Condensed Matter}, 13(46):10487-10496, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hardness-depth profile of a carbon-implanted Ti-6Al-4V alloy and its relation to composition and microstructure

Kunert, M., Kienzle, O., Baretzky, B., Baker, S. P., Mittemeijer, E. J.

{Journal of Materials Research}, 16(8):2321-2335, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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New Sm(Co, Fe, Cu, Zr)(z) magnets with better temperature stability

Tang, W., Zhang, Y., Goll, D., Hadjipanayis, G. C., Kronmüller, H.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 226(Sp. Iss. SI):1365-1366, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hydrogen in nanostructured vanadium-hydrogen systems

Orimo, S., Kimmerle, F., Majer, G.

{Physical Review B}, 63(9), 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Diffusion of hydrogen in heterogeneous systems

Herrmann, A., Schimmele, L., Mössinger, J., Hirscher, M., Kronmüller, H.

{Applied Physics A-Materials Science \& Processing}, 72(2):197-208, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structural vacancies in B2-CoAl and NiAl

Meyer, B., Bester, G., Fähnle, M.

{Scripta Materialia}, 44, pages: 2485-2488, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Grain boundary phase transition in the Cu-Bi system

Straumal, B. B., Prokofyev, S. I., Chang, L., Sluchanko, N. E., Baretzky, B., Gust, W., Mittemeijer, E. J.

{Diffusion and Defect Forum}, 194-199, pages: 1343-1348, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Carbon nanostructures: an efficient hydrogen storage medium for fuel cells

Atkinson, K., Roth, S., Hirscher, M., Grünwald, W.

{Fuel Cells Bulletin}, 4(38):9-12, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Magnetic domains in nanostructured media studied with M-TXM

Fischer, P., Eimüller, T., Schütz, G., Bayreuther, G., Tsunashima, S., Tagaki, N., Denbeaux, G., Attwood, D.

{Journal of Synchrotron Radiation}, 8, pages: 325-327, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Compound formation and abrasion resistance of ion-implanted Ti6Al4V

Schmidt, H., Schminke, A., Schmiedgen, M., Baretzky, B.

{Acta Materialia}, 49, pages: 487-495, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Interpretation of ab initio total energy results in a chemical language: I. Formalism and implementation into a mixed-basis pseudopotential code

Bester, G., Fähnle, M.

{Journal of Physics-Condensed Matter}, 13(50):11541-11550, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Faceting of \sum3 and \sum9 grain boundaries in copper

Straumal, B. B., Polyakov, S. A., Bischoff, E., Gust, W., Mittemeijer, E. J.

{Interface Science}, 9(3-4):287-292, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Generation and application of ultra-high-intensity magnetic field gradient pulses for NMR spectroscopy

Galvosas, P., Stallmach, F., Seiffert, G., Karger, J., Kaess, U., Majer, G.

{Journal of Magnetic Resonance}, 151(2):260-268, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Formation and structure of highly over-stoichiometric LaNi5+x (x\textasciitilde1) alloys obtained by manifold non-equilibrium methods

Cuevas, F., Latroche, M., Hirscher, M., Percheron-Guegan, A.

{Journal of Alloys and Compounds}, 323, pages: 4-7, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hydrogen permeability measurement through Pd, Ni and Fe membranes

Yamakawa, K., Ege, M., Ludescher, B., Hirscher, M., Kronmüller, H.

{Journal of Alloys and Compounds}, 321(1):17-23, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Ab-initio statistical mechanics for the phase diagram of NiAl including the effect of vacancies

Lechermann, F., Fähnle, M.

{Physica Status Solidi B-Basic Research}, 224(2):R4-R6, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Uniaxial orientational order-disorder transitions in diammine magnesium halides, Mg(ND3)2Cl2 and Mg(ND3)2Br2, investigated by neutron diffraction

Leineweber, A., Jacobs, H., Fischer, P., Böttger, G.

{Journal of Solid State Chemistry}, 156(2):487-499, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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XMCD study of the Ruddlesden-Popper Phase La1.2Nd0.2Sr1.6Mn2O7

Weigand, F., Goering, E., Geissler, J., Justen, M., Dörr, K., Ruck, K., Schütz, G.

{Journal of Synchrotron Radiation}, 8, pages: 431-433, 2001 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Nonlinear magnetoelastic effect in ultrathin epitaxial fcc Co (001) films: an ab-initio study

Komelj, M., Fähnle, M.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 224, pages: L1-L4, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Element-specific imaging of magnetic domains at 25 nm spatial Resolution using soft X-ray microscopy

Fischer, P., Eimüller, T., Schütz, G., Denbeaux, G., Pearson, A., Johnson, L., Attwood, D., Tsunashima, S., Kumazawa, M., Takagi, N., Köhler, M., Bayreuther, G.

{Review of Scientific Instruments}, 72, pages: 2322-2324, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Magnetization reversal of a multilayered FeGd dot array imaged by transmission X-ray microscopy

Eimüller, T., Scholz, M., Guttmann, P., Fischer, P., Köhler, M., Bayreuther, G., Schmahl, G., Schütz, G.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 89, pages: 7162-7164, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Ho-Fe - Garnet soft XMCD measurements below and above the compensation temperature

Goering, E., Gold, S., Schütz, G.

{Journal of Synchrotron Radiation}, 8, pages: 422-424, 2001 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Grain boundary grooving as an indicator of grain boundary phase transformations

Schölhammer, J., Baretzky, B., Gust, W., Mittemeijer, E., Straumal, B.

{Interface Science}, 9(1-2):43-53, 2001 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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X-MCD study of mixed valence manganites

Sikora, M., Kapusta, C., Zajac, D., Tokarz, W., Attenkofer, K., Fischer, P., Goering, E., Schütz, G.

{Journal of Alloys and Compounds}, 328(1-2):100-104, 2001 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Synchronized robot drumming by neural oscillator

Kotosaka, S., Schaal, S.

Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan, 19(1):116-123, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Sensory-motor integration is one of the key issues in robotics. In this paper, we propose an approach to rhythmic arm movement control that is synchronized with an external signal based on exploiting a simple neural oscillator network. Trajectory generation by the neural oscillator is a biologically inspired method that can allow us to generate a smooth and continuous trajectory. The parameter tuning of the oscillators is used to generate a synchronized movement with wide intervals. We adopted the method for the drumming task as an example task. By using this method, the robot can realize synchronized drumming with wide drumming intervals in real time. The paper also shows the experimental results of drumming by a humanoid robot.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Origins and violations of the 2/3 power law in rhythmic 3D movements

Schaal, S., Sternad, D.

Experimental Brain Research, 136, pages: 60-72, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
The 2/3 power law, the nonlinear relationship between tangential velocity and radius of curvature of the endeffector trajectory, has been suggested as a fundamental constraint of the central nervous system in the formation of rhythmic endpoint trajectories. However, studies on the 2/3 power law have largely been confined to planar drawing patterns of relatively small size. With the hypothesis that this strategy overlooks nonlinear effects that are constitutive in movement generation, the present experiments tested the validity of the power law in elliptical patterns which were not confined to a planar surface and which were performed by the unconstrained 7-DOF arm with significant variations in pattern size and workspace orientation. Data were recorded from five human subjects where the seven joint angles and the endpoint trajectories were analyzed. Additionally, an anthropomorphic 7-DOF robot arm served as a "control subject" whose endpoint trajectories were generated on the basis of the human joint angle data, modeled as simple harmonic oscillations. Analyses of the endpoint trajectories demonstrate that the power law is systematically violated with increasing pattern size, in both exponent and the goodness of fit. The origins of these violations can be explained analytically based on smooth rhythmic trajectory formation and the kinematic structure of the human arm. We conclude that in unconstrained rhythmic movements, the power law seems to be a by-product of a movement system that favors smooth trajectories, and that it is unlikely to serve as a primary movement generating principle. Our data rather suggests that subjects employed smooth oscillatory pattern generators in joint space to realize the required movement patterns.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Graph-matching vs. entropy-based methods for object detection
Neural Networks, 14(3):345-354, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Labeled Graph Matching (LGM) has been shown successful in numerous ob-ject vision tasks. This method is the basis for arguably the best face recognition system in the world. We present an algorithm for visual pattern recognition that is an extension of LGM ("LGM+"). We compare the performance of LGM and LGM+ algorithms with a state of the art statistical method based on Mutual Information Maximization (MIM). We present an adaptation of the MIM method for multi-dimensional Gabor wavelet features. The three pattern recognition methods were evaluated on an object detection task, using a set of stimuli on which none of the methods had been tested previously. The results indicate that while the performance of the MIM method operating upon Gabor wavelets is superior to the same method operating on pixels and to LGM, it is surpassed by LGM+. LGM+ offers a significant improvement in performance over LGM without losing LGMâ??s virtues of simplicity, biological plausibility, and a computational cost that is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the MIM algorithm. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]