Header logo is


2010


no image
Markerless tracking of Dynamic 3D Scans of Faces

Walder, C., Breidt, M., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B., Curio, C.

In Dynamic Faces: Insights from Experiments and Computation, pages: 255-276, (Editors: Curio, C., Bülthoff, H. H. and Giese, M. A.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2010 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

2010


Web [BibTex]


no image
Policy Gradient Methods

Peters, J., Bagnell, J.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, pages: 774-776, (Editors: Sammut, C. and Webb, G. I.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, December 2010 (inbook)

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Learning Continuous Grasp Affordances by Sensorimotor Exploration

Detry, R., Baseski, E., Popovic, M., Touati, Y., Krüger, N., Kroemer, O., Peters, J., Piater, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 451-465, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
We develop means of learning and representing object grasp affordances probabilistically. By grasp affordance, we refer to an entity that is able to assess whether a given relative object-gripper configuration will yield a stable grasp. These affordances are represented with grasp densities, continuous probability density functions defined on the space of 3D positions and orientations. Grasp densities are registered with a visual model of the object they characterize. They are exploited by aligning them to a target object using visual pose estimation. Grasp densities are refined through experience: A robot “plays” with an object by executing grasps drawn randomly for the object’s grasp density. The robot then uses the outcomes of these grasps to build a richer density through an importance sampling mechanism. Initial grasp densities, called hypothesis densities, are bootstrapped from grasps collected using a motion capture system, or from grasps generated from the visual model of the object. Refined densities, called empirical densities, represent affordances that have been confirmed through physical experience. The applicability of our method is demonstrated by producing empirical densities for two object with a real robot and its 3-finger hand. Hypothesis densities are created from visual cues and human demonstration.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Imitation and Reinforcement Learning for Motor Primitives with Perceptual Coupling

Kober, J., Mohler, B., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 209-225, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
Traditional motor primitive approaches deal largely with open-loop policies which can only deal with small perturbations. In this paper, we present a new type of motor primitive policies which serve as closed-loop policies together with an appropriate learning algorithm. Our new motor primitives are an augmented version version of the dynamical system-based motor primitives [Ijspeert et al(2002)Ijspeert, Nakanishi, and Schaal] that incorporates perceptual coupling to external variables. We show that these motor primitives can perform complex tasks such as Ball-in-a-Cup or Kendama task even with large variances in the initial conditions where a skilled human player would be challenged. We initialize the open-loop policies by imitation learning and the perceptual coupling with a handcrafted solution. We first improve the open-loop policies and subsequently the perceptual coupling using a novel reinforcement learning method which is particularly well-suited for dynamical system-based motor primitives.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots

Sigaud, O., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 1-12, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
The number of advanced robot systems has been increasing in recent years yielding a large variety of versatile designs with many degrees of freedom. These robots have the potential of being applicable in uncertain tasks outside wellstructured industrial settings. However, the complexity of both systems and tasks is often beyond the reach of classical robot programming methods. As a result, a more autonomous solution for robot task acquisition is needed where robots adaptively adjust their behaviour to the encountered situations and required tasks. Learning approaches pose one of the most appealing ways to achieve this goal. However, while learning approaches are of high importance for robotics, we cannot simply use off-the-shelf methods from the machine learning community as these usually do not scale into the domains of robotics due to excessive computational cost as well as a lack of scalability. Instead, domain appropriate approaches are needed. In this book, we focus on several core domains of robot learning. For accurate task execution, we need motor learning capabilities. For fast learning of the motor tasks, imitation learning offers the most promising approach. Self improvement requires reinforcement learning approaches that scale into the domain of complex robots. Finally, for efficient interaction of humans with robot systems, we will need a form of interaction learning. This chapter provides a general introduction to these issues and briefly presents the contributions of the subsequent chapters to the corresponding research topics.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Real-Time Local GP Model Learning

Nguyen-Tuong, D., Seeger, M., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, 264, pages: 193-207, Studies in Computational Intelligence, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
For many applications in robotics, accurate dynamics models are essential. However, in some applications, e.g., in model-based tracking control, precise dynamics models cannot be obtained analytically for sufficiently complex robot systems. In such cases, machine learning offers a promising alternative for approximating the robot dynamics using measured data. However, standard regression methods such as Gaussian process regression (GPR) suffer from high computational complexity which prevents their usage for large numbers of samples or online learning to date. In this paper, we propose an approximation to the standard GPR using local Gaussian processes models inspired by [Vijayakumar et al(2005)Vijayakumar, D’Souza, and Schaal, Snelson and Ghahramani(2007)]. Due to reduced computational cost, local Gaussian processes (LGP) can be applied for larger sample-sizes and online learning. Comparisons with other nonparametric regressions, e.g., standard GPR, support vector regression (SVR) and locally weighted proje ction regression (LWPR), show that LGP has high approximation accuracy while being sufficiently fast for real-time online learning.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Machine Learning Methods for Automatic Image Colorization

Charpiat, G., Bezrukov, I., Hofmann, M., Altun, Y., Schölkopf, B.

In Computational Photography: Methods and Applications, pages: 395-418, Digital Imaging and Computer Vision, (Editors: Lukac, R.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
We aim to color greyscale images automatically, without any manual intervention. The color proposition could then be interactively corrected by user-provided color landmarks if necessary. Automatic colorization is nontrivial since there is usually no one-to-one correspondence between color and local texture. The contribution of our framework is that we deal directly with multimodality and estimate, for each pixel of the image to be colored, the probability distribution of all possible colors, instead of choosing the most probable color at the local level. We also predict the expected variation of color at each pixel, thus defining a non-uniform spatial coherency criterion. We then use graph cuts to maximize the probability of the whole colored image at the global level. We work in the L-a-b color space in order to approximate the human perception of distances between colors, and we use machine learning tools to extract as much information as possible from a dataset of colored examples. The resulting algorithm is fast, designed to be more robust to texture noise, and is above all able to deal with ambiguity, in contrary to previous approaches.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Approaches Based on Support Vector Machine to Classification of Remote Sensing Data

Bruzzone, L., Persello, C.

In Handbook of Pattern Recognition and Computer Vision, pages: 329-352, (Editors: Chen, C.H.), ICP, London, UK, 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
This chapter presents an extensive and critical review on the use of kernel methods and in particular of support vector machines (SVMs) in the classification of remote-sensing (RS) data. The chapter recalls the mathematical formulation and the main theoretical concepts related to SVMs, and discusses the motivations at the basis of the use of SVMs in remote sensing. A review on the main applications of SVMs in classification of remote sensing is given, presenting a literature survey on the use of SVMs for the analysis of different kinds of RS images. In addition, the most recent methodological developments related to SVM-based classification techniques in RS are illustrated by focusing on semisupervised, domain adaptation, and context sensitive approaches. Finally, the most promising research directions on SVM in RS are identified and discussed.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Nanohandling robot cells

Fatikow, Sergej, Wich, Thomas, Dahmen, Christian, Jasper, Daniel, Stolle, Christian, Eichhorn, Volkmar, Hagemann, Saskia, Weigel-Jech, Michael

In Handbook of Nanophysics: Nanomedicine and Nanorobotics, pages: 1-31, CRC Press, 2010 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Locally weighted regression for control

Ting, J., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, pages: 613-624, (Editors: Sammut, C.;Webb, G. I.), Springer, 2010, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
This is article addresses two topics: learning control and locally weighted regression.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Physisorption in porous materials

Hirscher, M., Panella, B.

In Handbook of Hydrogen Storage, pages: 39-62, WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2010 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Adsorption technologies

Schmitz, B., Hirscher, M.

In Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, pages: 431-445, WILEY-VCH, Weinheim, 2010 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Atomic-Force-Microscopy-Based Nanomanipulation Systems

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

In Handbook of Nanophysics: Nanomedicine and Nanorobotics, pages: 1-15, CRC Press, 2010 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Taming the Beast: Guided Self-organization of Behavior in Autonomous Robots

Martius, G., Herrmann, J. M.

In From Animals to Animats 11, 6226, pages: 50-61, LNCS, Springer, 2010 (incollection)

al

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2008


no image
New Frontiers in Characterizing Structure and Dynamics by NMR

Nilges, M., Markwick, P., Malliavin, TE., Rieping, W., Habeck, M.

In Computational Structural Biology: Methods and Applications, pages: 655-680, (Editors: Schwede, T. , M. C. Peitsch), World Scientific, New Jersey, NJ, USA, May 2008 (inbook)

Abstract
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as the method of choice for studying both the structure and the dynamics of biological macromolecule in solution. Despite the maturity of the NMR method for structure determination, its application faces a number of challenges. The method is limited to systems of relatively small molecular mass, data collection times are long, data analysis remains a lengthy procedure, and it is difficult to evaluate the quality of the final structures. The last years have seen significant advances in experimental techniques to overcome or reduce some limitations. The function of bio-macromolecules is determined by both their 3D structure and conformational dynamics. These molecules are inherently flexible systems displaying a broad range of dynamics on time–scales from picoseconds to seconds. NMR is unique in its ability to obtain dynamic information on an atomic scale. The experimental information on structure and dynamics is intricately mixed. It is however difficult to unite both structural and dynamical information into one consistent model, and protocols for the determination of structure and dynamics are performed independently. This chapter deals with the challenges posed by the interpretation of NMR data on structure and dynamics. We will first relate the standard structure calculation methods to Bayesian probability theory. We will then briefly describe the advantages of a fully Bayesian treatment of structure calculation. Then, we will illustrate the advantages of using Bayesian reasoning at least partly in standard structure calculations. The final part will be devoted to interpretation of experimental data on dynamics.

ei

Web [BibTex]

2008


Web [BibTex]


no image
A Robot System for Biomimetic Navigation: From Snapshots to Metric Embeddings of View Graphs

Franz, MO., Stürzl, W., Reichardt, W., Mallot, HA.

In Robotics and Cognitive Approaches to Spatial Mapping, pages: 297-314, Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics ; 38, (Editors: Jefferies, M.E. , W.-K. Yeap), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2008 (inbook)

Abstract
Complex navigation behaviour (way-finding) involves recognizing several places and encoding a spatial relationship between them. Way-finding skills can be classified into a hierarchy according to the complexity of the tasks that can be performed [8]. The most basic form of way-finding is route navigation, followed by topological navigation where several routes are integrated into a graph-like representation. The highest level, survey navigation, is reached when this graph can be embedded into a common reference frame. In this chapter, we present the building blocks for a biomimetic robot navigation system that encompasses all levels of this hierarchy. As a local navigation method, we use scene-based homing. In this scheme, a goal location is characterized either by a panoramic snapshot of the light intensities as seen from the place, or by a record of the distances to the surrounding objects. The goal is found by moving in the direction that minimizes the discrepancy between the recorded intensities or distances and the current sensory input. For learning routes, the robot selects distinct views during exploration that are close enough to be reached by snapshot-based homing. When it encounters already visited places during route learning, it connects the routes and thus forms a topological representation of its environment termed a view graph. The final stage, survey navigation, is achieved by a graph embedding procedure which complements the topologic information of the view graph with odometric position estimates. Calculation of the graph embedding is done with a modified multidimensional scaling algorithm which makes use of distances and angles between nodes.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Hydrogen adsorption (Carbon, Zeolites, Nanocubes)

Hirscher, M., Panella, B.

In Hydrogen as a Future Energy Carrier, pages: 173-188, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2008 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Ma\ssgeschneiderte Speichermaterialien

Hirscher, M.

In Von Brennstoffzellen bis Leuchtdioden (Energie und Chemie - Ein Bündnis für die Zukunft), pages: 31-33, Deutsche Bunsen-Gesellschaft für Physikalische Chemie e.V., Frankfurt am Main, 2008 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2006


no image
Prediction of Protein Function from Networks

Shin, H., Tsuda, K.

In Semi-Supervised Learning, pages: 361-376, Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning, (Editors: Chapelle, O. , B. Schölkopf, A. Zien), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, November 2006 (inbook)

Abstract
In computational biology, it is common to represent domain knowledge using graphs. Frequently there exist multiple graphs for the same set of nodes, representing information from different sources, and no single graph is sufficient to predict class labels of unlabelled nodes reliably. One way to enhance reliability is to integrate multiple graphs, since individual graphs are partly independent and partly complementary to each other for prediction. In this chapter, we describe an algorithm to assign weights to multiple graphs within graph-based semi-supervised learning. Both predicting class labels and searching for weights for combining multiple graphs are formulated into one convex optimization problem. The graph-combining method is applied to functional class prediction of yeast proteins.When compared with individual graphs, the combined graph with optimized weights performs significantly better than any single graph.When compared with the semidefinite programming-based support vector machine (SDP/SVM), it shows comparable accuracy in a remarkably short time. Compared with a combined graph with equal-valued weights, our method could select important graphs without loss of accuracy, which implies the desirable property of integration with selectivity.

ei

Web [BibTex]

2006


Web [BibTex]


no image
Discrete Regularization

Zhou, D., Schölkopf, B.

In Semi-supervised Learning, pages: 237-250, Adaptive computation and machine learning, (Editors: O Chapelle and B Schölkopf and A Zien), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, November 2006 (inbook)

Abstract
Many real-world machine learning problems are situated on finite discrete sets, including dimensionality reduction, clustering, and transductive inference. A variety of approaches for learning from finite sets has been proposed from different motivations and for different problems. In most of those approaches, a finite set is modeled as a graph, in which the edges encode pairwise relationships among the objects in the set. Consequently many concepts and methods from graph theory are adopted. In particular, the graph Laplacian is widely used. In this chapter we present a systemic framework for learning from a finite set represented as a graph. We develop discrete analogues of a number of differential operators, and then construct a discrete analogue of classical regularization theory based on those discrete differential operators. The graph Laplacian based approaches are special cases of this general discrete regularization framework. An important thing implied in this framework is that we have a wide choices of regularization on graph in addition to the widely-used graph Laplacian based one.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Combining a Filter Method with SVMs

Lal, T., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Feature Extraction: Foundations and Applications, Studies in Fuzziness and Soft Computing, Vol. 207, pages: 439-446, Studies in Fuzziness and Soft Computing ; 207, (Editors: I Guyon and M Nikravesh and S Gunn and LA Zadeh), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2006 (inbook)

Abstract
Our goal for the competition (feature selection competition NIPS 2003) was to evaluate the usefulness of simple machine learning techniques. We decided to use the correlation criteria as a feature selection method and Support Vector Machines for the classification part. Here we explain how we chose the regularization parameter C of the SVM, how we determined the kernel parameter and how we estimated the number of features used for each data set. All analyzes were carried out on the training sets of the competition data. We choose the data set Arcene as an example to explain the approach step by step. In our view the point of this competition was the construction of a well performing classifier rather than the systematic analysis of a specific approach. This is why our search for the best classifier was only guided by the described methods and that we deviated from the road map at several occasions. All calculations were done with the software Spider [2004].

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Embedded methods

Lal, T., Chapelle, O., Weston, J., Elisseeff, A.

In Feature Extraction: Foundations and Applications, pages: 137-165, Studies in Fuzziness and Soft Computing ; 207, (Editors: Guyon, I. , S. Gunn, M. Nikravesh, L. A. Zadeh), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2006 (inbook)

Abstract
Embedded methods are a relatively new approach to feature selection. Unlike filter methods, which do not incorporate learning, and wrapper approaches, which can be used with arbitrary classifiers, in embedded methods the features selection part can not be separated from the learning part. Existing embedded methods are reviewed based on a unifying mathematical framework.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


Thumb xl 1 4020 4850 5 1
NONLINEAR OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF CHIRAL LIQUIDS Electric-dipolar pseudoscalars in nonlinear optics

Fischer, P., Champagne, B.

In NON-LINEAR OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER: FROM MOLECULES TO CONDENSED PHASES, 1, pages: 359-381, Challenges and Advances in Computational Chemistry and Physics, 2006 (incollection)

Abstract
We give all overview of linear and nonlinear optical processes that can be specific to chiral molecules in isotropic media. Specifically, we discuss the pseudoscalars that underlie nonlinear optical activity and chiral frequency conversion processes in fluids. We show that nonlinear optical techniques open entirely new ways of exploring chirality: Sum-frequency-generation (SFG) at second-order and BioCARS at fourth-order arise in the electric-dipole approximation and do not require circularly polarized light to detect chiral molecules in solution. Here the frequency conversion in itself is a measure of chirality. This is in contrast to natural optical activity phenomena which are based on the interference of radiation from induced oscillating electric and magnetic dipoles, and which are observed as a differential response to right and left circularly polarized light. We give examples from our SFG experiments in optically active solutions and show how the application of an additional static electric field to sum-frequency generation allows the absolute configuration of the chiral solute to be determined via all electric-dipolar process. Results from ab initio calculations of the SFG pseudoscalar are presented for a number of chiral molecules

pf

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Approximate nearest neighbor regression in very high dimensions

Vijayakumar, S., DSouza, A., Schaal, S.

In Nearest-Neighbor Methods in Learning and Vision, pages: 103-142, (Editors: Shakhnarovich, G.;Darrell, T.;Indyk, P.), Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006, clmc (inbook)

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

2005


no image
Support Vector Machines and Kernel Algorithms

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (2nd edition), Vol. 8, 8, pages: 5328-5335, (Editors: P Armitage and T Colton), John Wiley & Sons, NY USA, 2005 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

2005


[BibTex]


no image
Visual perception I: Basic principles

Wagemans, J., Wichmann, F., de Beeck, H.

In Handbook of Cognition, pages: 3-47, (Editors: Lamberts, K. , R. Goldstone), Sage, London, 2005 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Geckobot and waalbot: Small-scale wall climbing robots

Unver, O., Murphy, M., Sitti, M.

In Infotech@ Aerospace, pages: 6940, 2005 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2003


no image
Extension of the nu-SVM range for classification

Perez-Cruz, F., Weston, J., Herrmann, D., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Learning Theory: Methods, Models and Applications, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Sciences, Vol. 190, 190, pages: 179-196, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Sciences, (Editors: J Suykens and G Horvath and S Basu and C Micchelli and J Vandewalle), IOS Press, Amsterdam, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

2003


[BibTex]


no image
An Introduction to Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B.

In Recent Advances and Trends in Nonparametric Statistics , pages: 3-17, (Editors: MG Akritas and DN Politis), Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Statistical Learning and Kernel Methods in Bioinformatics

Schölkopf, B., Guyon, I., Weston, J.

In Artificial Intelligence and Heuristic Methods in Bioinformatics, 183, pages: 1-21, 3, (Editors: P Frasconi und R Shamir), IOS Press, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A Short Introduction to Learning with Kernels

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Proceedings of the Machine Learning Summer School, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 2600, pages: 41-64, LNAI 2600, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Bayesian Kernel Methods

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advanced Lectures on Machine Learning, Machine Learning Summer School 2002, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 2600, LNAI 2600, pages: 65-117, 0, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Stability of ensembles of kernel machines

Elisseeff, A., Pontil, M.

In 190, pages: 111-124, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Science, (Editors: Suykens, J., G. Horvath, S. Basu, C. Micchelli and J. Vandewalle), IOS press, Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Investigation of the Initial Oxidation of Surfaces of Quasicrystals by High-Resolution RBS and ERDA

Plachke, D., Khellaf, A., Kurth, M., Szökefalvi-Nagy, A., Carstanjen, H. D.

In Quasicrystals: Structure and Physical Properties, pages: 598-614, Wiley-VCH GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2003 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
AMOC in positron and positronium chemistry

Stoll, H., Castellaz, P., Siegle, A.

In Principles and Applications of Positron and Positronium Chemistry, pages: 344-366, World Scientific Publishers, Singapore, 2003 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]