Header logo is


2019


Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems - Highlights
Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems - Highlights
2019 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
In the future, artificially intelligent systems will substantially change the way we live, work, and communicate. Intelligent systems will become increasingly important in all spheres of life – as virtual systems on the Internet, or as cyber-physical systems in the real world. Artificial intelligence (AI) will be used for autonomous driving, as well as to diagnose and fight diseases, or to carry out emergency operations that are too dangerous for humans. This is just the beginning.

MPI IS Yearbook 2019 (en) MPI IS Jahresbericht 2019 (de) [BibTex]


Das Tier als Modell für Roboter, und Roboter als Modell für Tiere
Das Tier als Modell für Roboter, und Roboter als Modell für Tiere

Badri-Spröwitz, A.

In pages: 167-175, Springer, 2019 (incollection)

dlg

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2013


no image
A Review of Performance Variations in SMR-Based Brain–Computer Interfaces (BCIs)

Grosse-Wentrup, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Brain-Computer Interface Research, pages: 39-51, 4, SpringerBriefs in Electrical and Computer Engineering, (Editors: Guger, C., Allison, B. Z. and Edlinger, G.), Springer, 2013 (inbook)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

2013


PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Semi-supervised learning in causal and anticausal settings

Schölkopf, B., Janzing, D., Peters, J., Sgouritsa, E., Zhang, K., Mooij, J.

In Empirical Inference, pages: 129-141, 13, Festschrift in Honor of Vladimir Vapnik, (Editors: Schölkopf, B., Luo, Z. and Vovk, V.), Springer, 2013 (inbook)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Tractable large-scale optimization in machine learning

Sra, S.

In Tractability: Practical Approaches to Hard Problems, pages: 202-230, 7, (Editors: Bordeaux, L., Hamadi , Y., Kohli, P. and Mateescu, R. ), Cambridge University Press , 2013 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Perceiving Systems – Computers that see

Gehler, P. V.

2013 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Our research goal is to define in a mathematical precise way how visual perception works. We want to describe how intelligent systems understand images. To this end we study probabilistic models and statistical learning. Encoding prior knowledge about the world is complemented with automatic learning from training data. One aspect is being able to identify physical factors in images, such as lighting, geometry, and materials. Furthermore we want to automatically recognize and give names to objects and persons in images and understand the scene as a whole.

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Being small, being smart

Liu, Na

2013 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Metallic nanostructures feature plasmonic resonances which spatially confine light on the nanometer scale. In the ultimate limit of a single nanostructure, the electromagnetic field can be strongly concentrated in a volume of only a few hundred nm3 or less. We utilize such plasmonic focusing for hydrogen detection at the single particle level, which avoids any inhomogeneous broadening and statistical effects that would occur in sensors based on nanoparticle ensembles. This concept paves the road towards the observation of single catalytic processes in nanoreactors.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
On the Relations and Differences between Popper Dimension, Exclusion Dimension and VC-Dimension

Seldin, Y., Schölkopf, B.

In Empirical Inference - Festschrift in Honor of Vladimir N. Vapnik, pages: 53-57, 6, (Editors: Schölkopf, B., Luo, Z. and Vovk, V.), Springer, 2013 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Dynamics of nanodroplets on structured surfaces

Rauscher, M.

In Nanodroplets, 18, pages: 143-167, Lecture Notes in Nanoscale Science and Technology, Springer, New York, 2013 (incollection)

Abstract
Editors:Zhiming M. Wang

icm

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Wetting Phenomena on the Nanometer Scale

Rauscher, M., Dietrich, S., Napiórkowski, M.

In Nanoscale Liquid Interfaces - Wetting, Patterning and Force Microscopy at the Molecular Scale, pages: 83-154, Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd., Singapore, 2013 (incollection)

icm

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Using Torque Redundancy to Optimize Contact Forces in Legged Robots

Righetti, L., Buchli, J., Mistry, M., Kalakrishnan, M., Schaal, S.

In Redundancy in Robot Manipulators and Multi-Robot Systems, 57, pages: 35-51, Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2013 (incollection)

Abstract
The development of legged robots for complex environments requires controllers that guarantee both high tracking performance and compliance with the environment. More specifically the control of contact interaction with the environment is of crucial importance to ensure stable, robust and safe motions. In the following, we present an inverse dynamics controller that exploits torque redundancy to directly and explicitly minimize any combination of linear and quadratic costs in the contact constraints and in the commands. Such a result is particularly relevant for legged robots as it allows to use torque redundancy to directly optimize contact interactions. For example, given a desired locomotion behavior, it can guarantee the minimization of contact forces to reduce slipping on difficult terrains while ensuring high tracking performance of the desired motion. The proposed controller is very simple and computationally efficient, and most importantly it can greatly improve the performance of legged locomotion on difficult terrains as can be seen in the experimental results.

am mg

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Behavior as broken symmetry in embodied self-organizing robots

Der, R., Martius, G.

In Advances in Artificial Life, ECAL 2013, pages: 601-608, MIT Press, 2013 (incollection)

al

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Class-Specific Hough Forests for Object Detection
Class-Specific Hough Forests for Object Detection

Gall, J., Lempitsky, V.

In Decision Forests for Computer Vision and Medical Image Analysis, pages: 143-157, 11, (Editors: Criminisi, A. and Shotton, J.), Springer, 2013 (incollection)

ps

code Project Page [BibTex]

code Project Page [BibTex]

2012


no image
Expectation-Maximization methods for solving (PO)MDPs and optimal control problems

Toussaint, M., Storkey, A., Harmeling, S.

In Inference and Learning in Dynamic Models, (Editors: Barber, D., Cemgil, A.T. and Chiappa, S.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, January 2012 (inbook) In press

ei

PDF [BibTex]

2012


PDF [BibTex]


no image
Inferential structure determination from NMR data

Habeck, M.

In Bayesian methods in structural bioinformatics, pages: 287-312, (Editors: Hamelryck, T., Mardia, K. V. and Ferkinghoff-Borg, J.), Springer, New York, 2012 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Robot Learning

Sigaud, O., Peters, J.

In Encyclopedia of the sciences of learning, (Editors: Seel, N.M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Reinforcement Learning in Robotics: A Survey

Kober, J., Peters, J.

In Reinforcement Learning, 12, pages: 579-610, (Editors: Wiering, M. and Otterlo, M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

Abstract
As most action generation problems of autonomous robots can be phrased in terms of sequential decision problems, robotics offers a tremendously important and interesting application platform for reinforcement learning. Similarly, the real-world challenges of this domain pose a major real-world check for reinforcement learning. Hence, the interplay between both disciplines can be seen as promising as the one between physics and mathematics. Nevertheless, only a fraction of the scientists working on reinforcement learning are sufficiently tied to robotics to oversee most problems encountered in this context. Thus, we will bring the most important challenges faced by robot reinforcement learning to their attention. To achieve this goal, we will attempt to survey most work that has successfully applied reinforcement learning to behavior generation for real robots. We discuss how the presented successful approaches have been made tractable despite the complexity of the domain and will study how representations or the inclusion of prior knowledge can make a significant difference. As a result, a particular focus of our chapter lies on the choice between model-based and model-free as well as between value function-based and policy search methods. As a result, we obtain a fairly complete survey of robot reinforcement learning which should allow a general reinforcement learning researcher to understand this domain.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Higher-Order Tensors in Diffusion MRI

Schultz, T., Fuster, A., Ghosh, A., Deriche, R., Florack, L., Lim, L.

In Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data, (Editors: Westin, C. F., Vilanova, A. and Burgeth, B.), Springer, 2012 (inbook) Accepted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Brain-computer interfaces – a novel type of communication

Grosse-Wentrup, M.

2012 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) provide a new means of communication that does not rely on volitional muscle control. This may provide the capability to locked-in patients, e.g., those suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, to maintain interactions with their environment. Besides providing communication capabilities to locked-in patients, BCIs may further prove to have a beneficial impact on stroke rehabilitation. In this article, the state-of-the-art of BCIs is reviewed and current research questions are discussed.

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
From artificial flagella to medical microbots – the start of a "phantastic voyage"

Fischer, P.

2012 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
There have been numerous speculations in scientific publications and the popular media about wirelessly controlled microrobots (microbots) navigating the human body. Such micro-agents could revolutionize minimally invasive medical procedures. Using physical vapor deposition we grow billions of micron-sized colloidal screw-propellers on a wafer. These chiral mesoscopic screws can be magnetized and moved through solution under computer control. The screw-propellers resemble artificial flagella and are the only ‘microbots’ to date that can be fully controlled in solution at micron length scales.

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Automated Tip-Based 2-D Mechanical Assembly of Micro/Nanoparticles

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

In Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms, pages: 69-108, Springer US, 2012 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
The principles of XMCD and its application to L-edges in transition metals

Schütz, G.

In Linear and Chiral Dichroism in the Electron Miroscope, pages: 23-42, Pan Stanford Publishing Pte.Ltd., Singapore, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


An Introduction to Random Forests for Multi-class Object Detection
An Introduction to Random Forests for Multi-class Object Detection

Gall, J., Razavi, N., van Gool, L.

In Outdoor and Large-Scale Real-World Scene Analysis, 7474, pages: 243-263, LNCS, (Editors: Dellaert, Frank and Frahm, Jan-Michael and Pollefeys, Marc and Rosenhahn, Bodo and Leal-Taix’e, Laura), Springer, 2012 (incollection)

ps

code code for Hough forest publisher's site pdf Project Page [BibTex]

code code for Hough forest publisher's site pdf Project Page [BibTex]


Home {3D} body scans from noisy image and range data
Home 3D body scans from noisy image and range data

Weiss, A., Hirshberg, D., Black, M. J.

In Consumer Depth Cameras for Computer Vision: Research Topics and Applications, pages: 99-118, 6, (Editors: Andrea Fossati and Juergen Gall and Helmut Grabner and Xiaofeng Ren and Kurt Konolige), Springer-Verlag, 2012 (incollection)

ps

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Structural and chemical characterization on the nanoscale

Stierle, A., Carstanjen, H.-D., Hofmann, S.

In Nanoelectronics and Information Technology. Advanced Electronic Materials and Novel Devices, pages: 233-254, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Rutherford Backscattering

Carstanjen, H. D.

In Nanoelectronics and Information Technology. Advanced Electronic Materials and Novel Devices, pages: 250-252, WILEY-VCH Verlag, Weinheim, Germany, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2009


no image
Text Clustering with Mixture of von Mises-Fisher Distributions

Sra, S., Banerjee, A., Ghosh, J., Dhillon, I.

In Text mining: classification, clustering, and applications, pages: 121-161, Chapman & Hall/CRC data mining and knowledge discovery series, (Editors: Srivastava, A. N. and Sahami, M.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA, June 2009 (inbook)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2009


Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Data Mining for Biologists

Tsuda, K.

In Biological Data Mining in Protein Interaction Networks, pages: 14-27, (Editors: Li, X. and Ng, S.-K.), Medical Information Science Reference, Hershey, PA, USA, May 2009 (inbook)

Abstract
In this tutorial chapter, we review basics about frequent pattern mining algorithms, including itemset mining, association rule mining and graph mining. These algorithms can find frequently appearing substructures in discrete data. They can discover structural motifs, for example, from mutation data, protein structures and chemical compounds. As they have been primarily used for business data, biological applications are not so common yet, but their potential impact would be large. Recent advances in computers including multicore machines and ever increasing memory capacity support the application of such methods to larger datasets. We explain technical aspects of the algorithms, but do not go into details. Current biological applications are summarized and possible future directions are given.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Large Margin Methods for Part of Speech Tagging

Altun, Y.

In Automatic Speech and Speaker Recognition: Large Margin and Kernel Methods, pages: 141-160, (Editors: Keshet, J. and Bengio, S.), Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, USA, January 2009 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Covariate shift and local learning by distribution matching

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Huang, J., Schmittfull, M., Borgwardt, K., Schölkopf, B.

In Dataset Shift in Machine Learning, pages: 131-160, (Editors: Quiñonero-Candela, J., Sugiyama, M., Schwaighofer, A. and Lawrence, N. D.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2009 (inbook)

Abstract
Given sets of observations of training and test data, we consider the problem of re-weighting the training data such that its distribution more closely matches that of the test data. We achieve this goal by matching covariate distributions between training and test sets in a high dimensional feature space (specifically, a reproducing kernel Hilbert space). This approach does not require distribution estimation. Instead, the sample weights are obtained by a simple quadratic programming procedure. We provide a uniform convergence bound on the distance between the reweighted training feature mean and the test feature mean, a transductive bound on the expected loss of an algorithm trained on the reweighted data, and a connection to single class SVMs. While our method is designed to deal with the case of simple covariate shift (in the sense of Chapter ??), we have also found benefits for sample selection bias on the labels. Our correction procedure yields its greatest and most consistent advantages when the learning algorithm returns a classifier/regressor that is simpler" than the data might suggest.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Metal-Organic Frameworks

Panella, B., Hirscher, M.

In Encyclopedia of Electrochemical Power Sources, pages: 493-496, Elsevier, Amsterdam [et al.], 2009 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Carbon Materials

Hirscher, M.

In Encyclopedia of Electrochemical Power Sources, pages: 484-487, Elsevier, Amsterdam [et al.], 2009 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2008


no image
New Frontiers in Characterizing Structure and Dynamics by NMR

Nilges, M., Markwick, P., Malliavin, TE., Rieping, W., Habeck, M.

In Computational Structural Biology: Methods and Applications, pages: 655-680, (Editors: Schwede, T. , M. C. Peitsch), World Scientific, New Jersey, NJ, USA, May 2008 (inbook)

Abstract
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as the method of choice for studying both the structure and the dynamics of biological macromolecule in solution. Despite the maturity of the NMR method for structure determination, its application faces a number of challenges. The method is limited to systems of relatively small molecular mass, data collection times are long, data analysis remains a lengthy procedure, and it is difficult to evaluate the quality of the final structures. The last years have seen significant advances in experimental techniques to overcome or reduce some limitations. The function of bio-macromolecules is determined by both their 3D structure and conformational dynamics. These molecules are inherently flexible systems displaying a broad range of dynamics on time–scales from picoseconds to seconds. NMR is unique in its ability to obtain dynamic information on an atomic scale. The experimental information on structure and dynamics is intricately mixed. It is however difficult to unite both structural and dynamical information into one consistent model, and protocols for the determination of structure and dynamics are performed independently. This chapter deals with the challenges posed by the interpretation of NMR data on structure and dynamics. We will first relate the standard structure calculation methods to Bayesian probability theory. We will then briefly describe the advantages of a fully Bayesian treatment of structure calculation. Then, we will illustrate the advantages of using Bayesian reasoning at least partly in standard structure calculations. The final part will be devoted to interpretation of experimental data on dynamics.

ei

Web [BibTex]

2008


Web [BibTex]


no image
A Robot System for Biomimetic Navigation: From Snapshots to Metric Embeddings of View Graphs

Franz, MO., Stürzl, W., Reichardt, W., Mallot, HA.

In Robotics and Cognitive Approaches to Spatial Mapping, pages: 297-314, Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics ; 38, (Editors: Jefferies, M.E. , W.-K. Yeap), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2008 (inbook)

Abstract
Complex navigation behaviour (way-finding) involves recognizing several places and encoding a spatial relationship between them. Way-finding skills can be classified into a hierarchy according to the complexity of the tasks that can be performed [8]. The most basic form of way-finding is route navigation, followed by topological navigation where several routes are integrated into a graph-like representation. The highest level, survey navigation, is reached when this graph can be embedded into a common reference frame. In this chapter, we present the building blocks for a biomimetic robot navigation system that encompasses all levels of this hierarchy. As a local navigation method, we use scene-based homing. In this scheme, a goal location is characterized either by a panoramic snapshot of the light intensities as seen from the place, or by a record of the distances to the surrounding objects. The goal is found by moving in the direction that minimizes the discrepancy between the recorded intensities or distances and the current sensory input. For learning routes, the robot selects distinct views during exploration that are close enough to be reached by snapshot-based homing. When it encounters already visited places during route learning, it connects the routes and thus forms a topological representation of its environment termed a view graph. The final stage, survey navigation, is achieved by a graph embedding procedure which complements the topologic information of the view graph with odometric position estimates. Calculation of the graph embedding is done with a modified multidimensional scaling algorithm which makes use of distances and angles between nodes.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Dynamic density functional theory (DDFT)

Rauscher, M.

In Encyclopedia of Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, pages: 428-433, Springer, New York, 2008 (incollection)

icm

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Hydrogen adsorption (Carbon, Zeolites, Nanocubes)

Hirscher, M., Panella, B.

In Hydrogen as a Future Energy Carrier, pages: 173-188, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2008 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Ma\ssgeschneiderte Speichermaterialien

Hirscher, M.

In Von Brennstoffzellen bis Leuchtdioden (Energie und Chemie - Ein Bündnis für die Zukunft), pages: 31-33, Deutsche Bunsen-Gesellschaft für Physikalische Chemie e.V., Frankfurt am Main, 2008 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Adaptive stair-climbing behaviour with a hybrid legged-wheeled robot

Eich, M., Grimminger, F., Kirchner, F.

In Advances In Mobile Robotics, pages: 768-775, World Scientific, August 2008 (incollection)

am

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2007


no image
Support Vector Machine Learning for Interdependent and Structured Output Spaces

Altun, Y., Hofmann, T., Tsochantaridis, I.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 85-104, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: Bakir, G. H. , T. Hofmann, B. Schölkopf, A. J. Smola, B. Taskar, S. V. N. Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

2007


Web [BibTex]


no image
Brisk Kernel ICA

Jegelka, S., Gretton, A.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 225-250, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
Recent approaches to independent component analysis have used kernel independence measures to obtain very good performance in ICA, particularly in areas where classical methods experience difficulty (for instance, sources with near-zero kurtosis). In this chapter, we compare two efficient extensions of these methods for large-scale problems: random subsampling of entries in the Gram matrices used in defining the independence measures, and incomplete Cholesky decomposition of these matrices. We derive closed-form, efficiently computable approximations for the gradients of these measures, and compare their performance on ICA using both artificial and music data. We show that kernel ICA can scale up to much larger problems than yet attempted, and that incomplete Cholesky decomposition performs better than random sampling.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Training a Support Vector Machine in the Primal

Chapelle, O.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 29-50, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007, This is a slightly updated version of the Neural Computation paper (inbook)

Abstract
Most literature on Support Vector Machines (SVMs) concentrate on the dual optimization problem. In this paper, we would like to point out that the primal problem can also be solved efficiently, both for linear and non-linear SVMs, and that there is no reason to ignore this possibility. On the contrary, from the primal point of view new families of algorithms for large scale SVM training can be investigated.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Approximation Methods for Gaussian Process Regression

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Rasmussen, CE., Williams, CKI.

In Large-Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 203-223, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
A wealth of computationally efficient approximation methods for Gaussian process regression have been recently proposed. We give a unifying overview of sparse approximations, following Quiñonero-Candela and Rasmussen (2005), and a brief review of approximate matrix-vector multiplication methods.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Trading Convexity for Scalability

Collobert, R., Sinz, F., Weston, J., Bottou, L.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 275-300, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
Convex learning algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are often seen as highly desirable because they offer strong practical properties and are amenable to theoretical analysis. However, in this work we show how nonconvexity can provide scalability advantages over convexity. We show how concave-convex programming can be applied to produce (i) faster SVMs where training errors are no longer support vectors, and (ii) much faster Transductive SVMs.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Classifying Event-Related Desynchronization in EEG, ECoG and MEG signals

Hill, N., Lal, T., Tangermann, M., Hinterberger, T., Widman, G., Elger, C., Schölkopf, B., Birbaumer, N.

In Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing, pages: 235-260, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: G Dornhege and J del R Millán and T Hinterberger and DJ McFarland and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Joint Kernel Maps

Weston, J., Bakir, G., Bousquet, O., Mann, T., Noble, W., Schölkopf, B.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 67-84, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: GH Bakir and T Hofmann and B Schölkopf and AJ Smola and B Taskar and SVN Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Brain-Computer Interfaces for Communication in Paralysis: A Clinical Experimental Approach

Hinterberger, T., Nijboer, F., Kübler, A., Matuz, T., Furdea, A., Mochty, U., Jordan, M., Lal, T., Hill, J., Mellinger, J., Bensch, M., Tangermann, M., Widman, G., Elger, C., Rosenstiel, W., Schölkopf, B., Birbaumer, N.

In Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing, pages: 43-64, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: G. Dornhege and J del R Millán and T Hinterberger and DJ McFarland and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Probabilistic Structure Calculation

Rieping, W., Habeck, M., Nilges, M.

In Structure and Biophysics: New Technologies for Current Challenges in Biology and Beyond, pages: 81-98, NATO Security through Science Series, (Editors: Puglisi, J. D.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, March 2007 (inbook)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
On the Pre-Image Problem in Kernel Methods

BakIr, G., Schölkopf, B., Weston, J.

In Kernel Methods in Bioengineering, Signal and Image Processing, pages: 284-302, (Editors: G Camps-Valls and JL Rojo-Álvarez and M Martínez-Ramón), Idea Group Publishing, Hershey, PA, USA, January 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
In this chapter we are concerned with the problem of reconstructing patterns from their representation in feature space, known as the pre-image problem. We review existing algorithms and propose a learning based approach. All algorithms are discussed regarding their usability and complexity and evaluated on an image denoising application.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Inhomogeneous platelets and rod fluids

Harnau, L., Dietrich, S.

In Soft Matter, Vol. 3, pages: 156-311, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2007 (incollection)

icm

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Bacteria integrated swimming microrobots

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

In 50 years of artificial intelligence, pages: 154-163, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]