Header logo is de


2018


no image
Discovering and Teaching Optimal Planning Strategies

Lieder, F., Callaway, F., Krueger, P. M., Das, P., Griffiths, T. L., Gul, S.

In The 14th biannual conference of the German Society for Cognitive Science, GK, September 2018, Falk Lieder and Frederick Callaway contributed equally to this publication. (inproceedings)

Abstract
How should we think and decide, and how can we learn to make better decisions? To address these questions we formalize the discovery of cognitive strategies as a metacognitive reinforcement learning problem. This formulation leads to a computational method for deriving optimal cognitive strategies and a feedback mechanism for accelerating the process by which people learn how to make better decisions. As a proof of concept, we apply our approach to develop an intelligent system that teaches people optimal planning stratgies. Our training program combines a novel process-tracing paradigm that makes peoples latent planning strategies observable with an intelligent system that gives people feedback on how their planning strategy could be improved. The pedagogy of our intelligent tutor is based on the theory that people discover their cognitive strategies through metacognitive reinforcement learning. Concretely, the tutor’s feedback is designed to maximally accelerate people’s metacognitive reinforcement learning towards the optimal cognitive strategy. A series of four experiments confirmed that training with the cognitive tutor significantly improved people’s decision-making competency: Experiment 1 demonstrated that the cognitive tutor’s feedback accelerates participants’ metacognitive learning. Experiment 2 found that this training effect transfers to more difficult planning problems in more complex environments. Experiment 3 found that these transfer effects are retained for at least 24 hours after the training. Finally, Experiment 4 found that practicing with the cognitive tutor conveys additional benefits above and beyond verbal description of the optimal planning strategy. The results suggest that promoting metacognitive reinforcement learning with optimal feedback is a promising approach to improving the human mind.

re

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

2018


link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Discovering Rational Heuristics for Risky Choice

Gul, S., Krueger, P. M., Callaway, F., Griffiths, T. L., Lieder, F.

The 14th biannual conference of the German Society for Cognitive Science, GK, The 14th biannual conference of the German Society for Cognitive Science, GK, September 2018 (conference)

Abstract
How should we think and decide to make the best possible use of our precious time and limited cognitive resources? And how do people’s cognitive strategies compare to this ideal? We study these questions in the domain of multi-alternative risky choice using the methodology of resource-rational analysis. To answer the first question, we leverage a new meta-level reinforcement learning algorithm to derive optimal heuristics for four different risky choice environments. We find that our method rediscovers two fast-and-frugal heuristics that people are known to use, namely Take-The-Best and choosing randomly, as resource-rational strategies for specific environments. Our method also discovered a novel heuristic that combines elements of Take-The-Best and Satisficing. To answer the second question, we use the Mouselab paradigm to measure how people’s decision strategies compare to the predictions of our resource-rational analysis. We found that our resource-rational analysis correctly predicted which strategies people use and under which conditions they use them. While people generally tend to make rational use of their limited resources overall, their strategy choices do not always fully exploit the structure of each decision problem. Overall, people’s decision operations were about 88% as resource-rational as they could possibly be. A formal model comparison confirmed that our resource-rational model explained people’s decision strategies significantly better than the Directed Cognition model of Gabaix et al. (2006). Our study is a proof-of-concept that optimal cognitive strategies can be automatically derived from the principle of resource-rationality. Our results suggest that resource-rational analysis is a promising approach for uncovering people’s cognitive strategies and revisiting the debate about human rationality with a more realistic normative standard.

re

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Learning to Select Computations

Callaway, F., Gul, S., Krueger, P. M., Griffiths, T. L., Lieder, F.

In Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence: Proceedings of the Thirty-Fourth Conference, August 2018, Frederick Callaway and Sayan Gul and Falk Lieder contributed equally to this publication. (inproceedings)

Abstract
The efficient use of limited computational resources is an essential ingredient of intelligence. Selecting computations optimally according to rational metareasoning would achieve this, but this is computationally intractable. Inspired by psychology and neuroscience, we propose the first concrete and domain-general learning algorithm for approximating the optimal selection of computations: Bayesian metalevel policy search (BMPS). We derive this general, sample-efficient search algorithm for a computation-selecting metalevel policy based on the insight that the value of information lies between the myopic value of information and the value of perfect information. We evaluate BMPS on three increasingly difficult metareasoning problems: when to terminate computation, how to allocate computation between competing options, and planning. Across all three domains, BMPS achieved near-optimal performance and compared favorably to previously proposed metareasoning heuristics. Finally, we demonstrate the practical utility of BMPS in an emergency management scenario, even accounting for the overhead of metareasoning.

re

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Kernel Recursive ABC: Point Estimation with Intractable Likelihood

Kajihara, T., Kanagawa, M., Yamazaki, K., Fukumizu, K.

Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 2405-2414, PMLR, July 2018 (conference)

Abstract
We propose a novel approach to parameter estimation for simulator-based statistical models with intractable likelihood. Our proposed method involves recursive application of kernel ABC and kernel herding to the same observed data. We provide a theoretical explanation regarding why the approach works, showing (for the population setting) that, under a certain assumption, point estimates obtained with this method converge to the true parameter, as recursion proceeds. We have conducted a variety of numerical experiments, including parameter estimation for a real-world pedestrian flow simulator, and show that in most cases our method outperforms existing approaches.

pn

Paper [BibTex]

Paper [BibTex]


no image
Assessment Of Atypical Motor Development In Infants Through Toy-Stimulated Play And Center Of Pressure Analysis

Zhao, S., Mohan, M., Torres, W. O., Bogen, D. K., Shofer, F. S., Prosser, L., Loeb, H., Johnson, M. J.

In Proceedings of the Annual Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Conference, Arlington, USA, July 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
There is a need to identify measures and create systems to assess motor development at an early stage. Center of Pressure (CoP) is a quantifiable metric that has been used to investigate postural control in healthy young children [6], children with CP [7], and infants just beginning to sit [8]. It was found that infants born prematurely exhibit different patterns of CoP movement than infants born full-term when assessing development impairments relating to postural control [9]. Preterm infants exhibited greater CoP excursions but had greater variability in their movements than fullterm infants. Our solution, the Play And Neuro-Development Assessment (PANDA) Gym, is a sensorized environment that aims to provide early diagnosis of neuromotor disorder in infants and improve current screening processes by providing quantitative measures rather than subjective ones, and promoting natural play with the stimulus of toys. Previous studies have documented stages in motor development in infants [10, 11], and developmental delays could become more apparent through toy interactions. This study examines the sensitivity of the pressure-sensitive mat subsystem to detect differences in CoP movement patterns for preterm and fullterm infants less than 6 months of age, with varying risk levels. This study aims to distinguish between typical and atypical motor development through assessment of the CoP data of infants in a natural play environment, in conditions where movement may be further stimulated with the presence of a toy.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Counterfactual Mean Embedding: A Kernel Method for Nonparametric Causal Inference

Muandet, K., Kanagawa, M., Saengkyongam, S., Marukata, S.

Workshop on Machine Learning for Causal Inference, Counterfactual Prediction, and Autonomous Action (CausalML) at ICML, July 2018 (conference)

ei pn

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


A resource-rational analysis of human planning
A resource-rational analysis of human planning

Callaway, F., Lieder, F., Das, P., Gul, S., Krueger, P. M., Griffiths, T. L.

In Proceedings of the 40th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, May 2018, Frederick Callaway and Falk Lieder contributed equally to this publication. (inproceedings)

Abstract
People's cognitive strategies are jointly shaped by function and computational constraints. Resource-rational analysis leverages these constraints to derive rational models of people's cognitive strategies from the assumption that people make rational use of limited cognitive resources. We present a resource-rational analysis of planning and evaluate its predictions in a newly developed process tracing paradigm. In Experiment 1, we find that a resource-rational planning strategy predicts the process by which people plan more accurately than previous models of planning. Furthermore, in Experiment 2, we find that it also captures how people's planning strategies adapt to the structure of the environment. In addition, our approach allows us to quantify for the first time how close people's planning strategies are to being resource-rational and to characterize in which ways they conform to and deviate from optimal planning.

re

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Travelling Ultrasonic Wave Enhances Keyclick Sensation

Gueorguiev, D., Kaci, A., Amberg, M., Giraud, F., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In Haptics: Science, Technology, and Applications, pages: 302-312, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A realistic keyclick sensation is a serious challenge for haptic feedback since vibrotactile rendering faces the limitation of the absence of contact force as experienced on physical buttons. It has been shown that creating a keyclick sensation is possible with stepwise ultrasonic friction modulation. However, the intensity of the sensation is limited by the impedance of the fingertip and by the absence of a lateral force component external to the finger. In our study, we compare this technique to rendering with an ultrasonic travelling wave, which exerts a lateral force on the fingertip. For both techniques, participants were asked to report the detection (or not) of a keyclick during a forced choice one interval procedure. In experiment 1, participants could press the surface as many time as they wanted for a given trial. In experiment 2, they were constrained to press only once. The results show a lower perceptual threshold for travelling waves. Moreover, participants pressed less times per trial and exerted smaller normal force on the surface. The subjective quality of the sensation was found similar for both techniques. In general, haptic feedback based on travelling ultrasonic waves is promising for applications without lateral motion of the finger.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Dissecting Adam: The Sign, Magnitude and Variance of Stochastic Gradients
Dissecting Adam: The Sign, Magnitude and Variance of Stochastic Gradients

Balles, L., Hennig, P.

In Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2018 (inproceedings) Accepted

Abstract
The ADAM optimizer is exceedingly popular in the deep learning community. Often it works very well, sometimes it doesn't. Why? We interpret ADAM as a combination of two aspects: for each weight, the update direction is determined by the sign of stochastic gradients, whereas the update magnitude is determined by an estimate of their relative variance. We disentangle these two aspects and analyze them in isolation, gaining insight into the mechanisms underlying ADAM. This analysis also extends recent results on adverse effects of ADAM on generalization, isolating the sign aspect as the problematic one. Transferring the variance adaptation to SGD gives rise to a novel method, completing the practitioner's toolbox for problems where ADAM fails.

pn

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Exploring Fingers’ Limitation of Texture Density Perception on Ultrasonic Haptic Displays

Kalantari, F., Gueorguiev, D., Lank, E., Bremard, N., Grisoni, L.

In Haptics: Science, Technology, and Applications, pages: 354-365, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recent research in haptic feedback is motivated by the crucial role that tactile perception plays in everyday touch interactions. In this paper, we describe psychophysical experiments to investigate the perceptual threshold of individual fingers on both the right and left hand of right-handed participants using active dynamic touch for spatial period discrimination of both sinusoidal and square-wave gratings on ultrasonic haptic touchscreens. Both one-finger and multi-finger touch were studied and compared. Our results indicate that users' finger identity (index finger, middle finger, etc.) significantly affect the perception of both gratings in the case of one-finger exploration. We show that index finger and thumb are the most sensitive in all conditions whereas little finger followed by ring are the least sensitive for haptic perception. For multi-finger exploration, the right hand was found to be more sensitive than the left hand for both gratings. Our findings also demonstrate similar perception sensitivity between multi-finger exploration and the index finger of users' right hands (i.e. dominant hand in our study), while significant difference was found between single and multi-finger perception sensitivity for the left hand.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2013


no image
Virtual Robotization of the Human Body via Data-Driven Vibrotactile Feedback

Kurihara, Y., Hachisu, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kajimoto, H.

In Proc. International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology (ACE), 8253, pages: 109-122, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer, Enschede, Netherlands, 2013, Oral presentation given by Kurihara. Best Paper Silver Award (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

2013


[BibTex]


no image
Governance of Humanoid Robot Using Master Exoskeleton

Kumra, S., Mohan, M., Gupta, S., Vaswani, H.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on Robotics (ISR), Seoul, South Korea, October 2013 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Dexto:Eka: is an adult-size humanoid robot being developed with the aim of achieving tele-presence. The paper sheds light on the control of this robot using a Master Exoskeleton which comprises of an Exo-Frame, a Control Column and a Graphical User Interface. It further illuminates the processes and algorithms that have been utilized to make an efficient system that would effectively emulate a tele-operator.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Virtual Robotization of the Human Body Using Vibration Recording, Modeling and Rendering

Kurihara, Y., Hachisu, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kajimoto, H.

In Proc. Virtual Reality Society of Japan Annual Conference, Osaka, Japan, sep 2013, Paper written in Japanese. Presentation given by Kurihara (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Design and development part 2 of Dexto:Eka: - The humanoid robot

Kumra, S., Mohan, M., Gupta, S., Vaswani, H.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Mechatronics and Automation (ICMA), Takamatsu, Japan, August 2013 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Through this paper, we elucidate the second phase of the design and development of the tele-operated humanoid robot Dexto:Eka:. Phase one comprised of the development of a 6 DoF left anthropomorphic arm and left exo-frame. Here, we illustrate the development of the right arm, right exo-frame, torso, backbone, human machine interface and omni-directional locomotion system. Dexto:Eka: will be able to communicate with a remote user through Wi-Fi. An exo-frame capacitates it to emulate human arms and its locomotion is controlled by joystick. A Graphical User Interface monitors and helps in controlling the system.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Virtual Alteration of Body Material by Reality-Based Periodic Vibrotactile Feedback

Kurihara, Y., Hachisu, T., Sato, M., Fukushima, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kajimoto, H.

In Proc. JSME Robotics and Mechatronics Conference (ROBOMEC), Tsukuba, Japan, May 2013, Paper written in Japanese. Poster presentation given by {Kurihara} (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
The Design and Field Observation of a Haptic Notification System for Oral Presentations

Tam, D., MacLean, K. E., McGrenere, J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pages: 1689-1698, Paris, France, May 2013, Oral presentation given by Tam (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Using Robotic Exploratory Procedures to Learn the Meaning of Haptic Adjectives

Chu, V., McMahon, I., Riano, L., McDonald, C. G., He, Q., Perez-Tejada, J. M., Arrigo, M., Fitter, N., Nappo, J., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 3048-3055, Karlsruhe, Germany, May 2013, Oral presentation given by Chu. Best Cognitive Robotics Paper Award (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Instrument contact vibrations are a construct-valid measure of technical skill in Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery Training Tasks

Gomez, E. D., Aggarwal, R., McMahan, W., Koch, E., Hashimoto, D. A., Darzi, A., Murayama, K. M., Dumon, K. R., Williams, N. N., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education, Orlando, Florida, USA, 2013, Oral presentation given by Gomez (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Dynamic Simulation of Tool-Mediated Texture Interaction

McDonald, C. G., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, pages: 307-312, Daejeon, South Korea, April 2013, Oral presentation given by McDonald (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Generating Haptic Texture Models From Unconstrained Tool-Surface Interactions

Culbertson, H., Unwin, J., Goodman, B. E., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, pages: 295-300, Daejeon, South Korea, April 2013, Oral presentation given by Culbertson. Finalist for Best Paper Award (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A practical System for Recording Instrument Contacts and Collisions During Transoral Robotic Surgery

Gomez, E. D., Weinstein, G. S., O’Malley, J. B. W., McMahan, W., Chen, L., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Annual Meeting of the Triological Society, Orlando, Florida, USA, April 2013, Poster presentation given by Gomez (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
The Randomized Dependence Coefficient

Lopez-Paz, D., Hennig, P., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 1-9, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges, L. Bottou, M. Welling, Z. Ghahramani, and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

ei pn

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Fast Probabilistic Optimization from Noisy Gradients

Hennig, P.

In Proceedings of The 30th International Conference on Machine Learning, JMLR W&CP 28(1), pages: 62–70, (Editors: S Dasgupta and D McAllester), ICML, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei pn

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


Nonparametric dynamics estimation for time periodic systems
Nonparametric dynamics estimation for time periodic systems

Klenske, E., Zeilinger, M., Schölkopf, B., Hennig, P.

In Proceedings of the 51st Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, pages: 486-493 , 2013 (inproceedings)

ei pn

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Analytical probabilistic proton dose calculation and range uncertainties

Bangert, M., Hennig, P., Oelfke, U.

In 17th International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy, pages: 6-11, (Editors: A. Haworth and T. Kron), ICCR, 2013 (inproceedings)

ei pn

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Self-tuning in Sliding Mode Control of High-Precision Motion Systems
Self-tuning in Sliding Mode Control of High-Precision Motion Systems

Heertjes, M. F., Vardar, Y.

In IFAC Proceedings Volumes, 46(5):13 - 19, 2013, 6th IFAC Symposium on Mechatronic Systems (inproceedings)

Abstract
In high-precision motion systems, set-point tracking often comes with the problem of overshoot, hence poor settling behavior. To avoid overshoot, PD control (thus without using an integrator) is preferred over PID control. However, PD control gives rise to steady-state error in view of the constant disturbances acting on the system. To deal with both overshoot and steady-state error, a sliding mode controller with saturated integrator is studied. For large servo signals the controller is switched to PD mode as to constrain the integrator buffer and therefore the overshoot. For small servo signals the controller switches to PID mode as to avoid steady-state error. The tuning of the switching parameters will be done automatically with the aim to optimize the settling behavior. The sliding mode controller will be tested on a high-precision motion system.

hi

heertjes_ifac2013 link (url) DOI [BibTex]

heertjes_ifac2013 link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Controllability and Resource-Rational Planning

Lieder, F., Goodman, N. D., Huys, Q. J.

In Computational and Systems Neuroscience (Cosyne), pages: 112, 2013 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Learned helplessness experiments involving controllable vs. uncontrollable stressors have shown that the perceived ability to control events has profound consequences for decision making. Normative models of decision making, however, do not naturally incorporate knowledge about controllability, and previous approaches to incorporating it have led to solutions with biologically implausible computational demands [1,2]. Intuitively, controllability bounds the differential rewards for choosing one strategy over another, and therefore believing that the environment is uncontrollable should reduce one’s willingness to invest time and effort into choosing between options. Here, we offer a normative, resource-rational account of the role of controllability in trading mental effort for expected gain. In this view, the brain not only faces the task of solving Markov decision problems (MDPs), but it also has to optimally allocate its finite computational resources to solve them efficiently. This joint problem can itself be cast as a MDP [3], and its optimal solution respects computational constraints by design. We start with an analytic characterisation of the influence of controllability on the use of computational resources. We then replicate previous results on the effects of controllability on the differential value of exploration vs. exploitation, showing that these are also seen in a cognitively plausible regime of computational complexity. Third, we find that controllability makes computation valuable, so that it is worth investing more mental effort the higher the subjective controllability. Fourth, we show that in this model the perceived lack of control (helplessness) replicates empirical findings [4] whereby patients with major depressive disorder are less likely to repeat a choice that led to a reward, or to avoid a choice that led to a loss. Finally, the model makes empirically testable predictions about the relationship between reaction time and helplessness.

re

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Learned helplessness and generalization

Lieder, F., Goodman, N. D., Huys, Q. J. M.

In 35th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2013 (inproceedings)

re

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Reverse-Engineering Resource-Efficient Algorithms

Lieder, F., Goodman, N. D., Griffiths, T. L.

In NIPS Workshop Resource-Efficient Machine Learning, 2013 (inproceedings)

re

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A Practical System For Recording Instrument Interactions During Live Robotic Surgery

McMahan, W., Gomez, E. D., Chen, L., Bark, K., Nappo, J. C., Koch, E. I., Lee, D. I., Dumon, K., Williams, N., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Medicine Meets Virtual Reality, 2013, Poster presentation given by McMahan (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]